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The Constant Princess
Philippa Gregory
074327248X
December 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
As youngest daughter to the Spanish monarchs and crusaders King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, Catalina, princess of Wales and of Spain, was promised to the English Prince Arthur when she was three. She leaves Spain at 15 to fulfill her destiny as queen of England, where she finds true love with Arthur (after some initial sourness) as they plot the future of their kingdom together. Arthur dies young, however, leaving Catalina a widow and ineligible for the throne. Before his death, he extracts a promise from his wife to marry his younger brother Henry in order to become queen anyway, have children and rule as they had planned, a situation that can only be if Catalina denies that Arthur was ever her lover. Gregory's latest (after Earthly Joys) compellingly dramatizes how Catalina uses her faith, her cunning and her...


Commander of the Armada : The Seventh Duke of Medina Sidonia

0300044089


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Dogs of God
James Reston
0385508484
Oct 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Veteran journalist and author Reston brings to life three key elements of Spanish history that intertwined in 1492. Columbus takes a back seat to the Inquisition and the defeat of Islamic Granada, but plays a key role in demonstrating their relationship to the rise of empire and the modern state. Reston (Warriors of God; Galileo) has done tremendous research, though the shadows of his mostly older sources tend to show in stereotypes of the treasure-hungry, Machiavellian Ferdinand and the handsome adventurer Columbus charming Isabella. While he reduces the order of Dominicans to their role as inquisitors, he generally does justice to the complexities of his subject, examining the worlds of Christians, Muslims and Jews with sympathy and irony, and incorporating portraits of several lesser-known figures. The...


The Alhambra
Robert Irwin
0674015681
Sept 2004
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Built mostly in the mid- to late fourteenth century atop a hill overlooking Granada, Spain, the Alhambra stands as a stunning example of Moorish architecture, the only Muslim palace to have survived since the Middle Ages. Its inordinate artistic detailing and disorderly layout--"underpinned," Irwin suggests, "by a geometry that [has] mystical resonance"--attract thousands of tourists every day. But the Alhambra has a complicated and often unclear history; it has served as a jail for debtors, invalid soldiers, and gypsies, and in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries was "a monument to murder, slavery, poverty, and fear." In addition, as the site of the Moors' last stand before being driven from Spain by the Christian Reconquista in 1492, it has come to symbolize, for many Arabs and Muslims, everything they have lost in...


Story of Spain: The Dramatic History of Europe's Most Fascinating Country
Mark R. Williams
0970696922
April 2004
Paperback
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Paul Smith, Professor Emeritus, Department of Spanish, U.C.L.A.
"By far the best introduction for students in English to Spain's history and culture..."

David Baird, Lookout Magazine
"A vivid account of the country's origins and development as a nation..."

See all Editorial Reviews


Traveller's History of Spain
Juan Lalaguna
1566564069
May 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
During its "golden age," Spain was a political giant whose influence spanned the world from Germany to the Western Pacific. Rich on American gold and silver, Spain was able to send the Armada against England, defeat the Turks and challenge France for the hegemony of Europe. This book will unlock the secrets of Spain's vibrant and colorful past, its people and culture for the interested traveller. It takes the reader on a journey from the earliest settlements on the Iberian Peninsula, through the influences of the Romans, the Goths and the Muslims, the traumas of expansion and the end of the Empire, right up to the present.

About the Author
Juan Lalaguna is the head of the Department of Hispanic Studies at the University of North London.


Empires of the Atlantic World : Britain and Spain in America 1492-1830
John H. Elliott
0300114311
May 8, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. In a masterful account, Oxford don Elliott explores the simultaneous development of Spanish and English colonies in the so-called New World. Though colonists tried to recreate traditional institutions on American soil, there were inevitable differences between colonial life and life in the mother countries: familial roles, for example, were reconfigured across the ocean. In addition to differing from Europe, Spanish and British settlements differed from one another, says Elliott. Whereas Spain determined to prevent Jews and Moors from entering its territories, Britain's grudging acceptance of religious diversity was evidenced in the Crown's allowing, and in some cases encouraging, persecuted minorities to join colonial ventures. The English colonies' fractious Protestantism made Spain's...


Spain: A History
Raymond Carr (Editor)
0192802364
December 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
Spain, influential historians once maintained, was an "exceptional" country--meaning that, in many key respects, it lay outside the course of European history. Unlike any other nation of Western Europe, Spain was for centuries the province of Islamic rulers, and the crowned heads of other parts of the continent scorned it as an "oriental," necessarily backward nation--when in many ways it was considerably more advanced than its neighbors.

The exceptionalist view of Spanish history was misguided and damaging, writes the eminent historian Raymond Carr, but it was one that many Spanish people accepted: to them, it helped explain why Spain, once so mighty and rich an empire, should have fallen behind while the rest of Europe grew stronger and wealthier, and why a retrograde ruler like Franco could have remained in power when...



The Basque History of the World
Mark Kurlansky
0140298517
Feb 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
The buzz about the Guggenheim Bilbão aside, the Basques seldom get good press--from the 12th-century Codex of Calixtus ("A Basque or Navarrese would do in a French man for a copper coin") to current news items about ETA, the Basque nationalist group. Mark Kurlansky, author of Cod, sets out to change all that in The Basque History of the World.

"The singular remarkable fact about the Basques is that they still exist," Kurlansky asserts. Without a defined country (other than Euskadi, otherwise known as "Basqueland"), with no known related ethnic groups, the Basques are an anomaly in Europe. What unites the Basques, above all, is their language--Euskera. According to ETA, "Euskera is the quintessence of Euskadi. So long as Euskera is alive, Euskadi will live." To help provide a complete picture of the Basques,...



Barcelona
Robert Hughes
0679743839
Mar 1993
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Hughes's historical-cultural treatise on the Catalonian capital sparkles on the topic of architecture. Photos. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
YA-- The throbbing beat of flamenco guitars and the clicking of castanets resound as readers peruse the pages of this epic history. Founded as an encampment by Roman invaders around 210 B.C. , Barcelona passed through centuries of strife until it reached its ``Golden Age'' between the years 1850 and 1925; it is on this era that Hughes focuses. Aficianados of his descriptive, colorful prose style from such bestsellers as The Fatal Shore (Random, 1988) and The Shock of the New (McGraw, 1981) will not be disappointed with this work, and students of architecture will be especially pleased with...


The Sun Also Rises
Ernest Hemingway
0684800713
January 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
The Sun Also Rises first appeared in 1926, and yet it's as fresh and clean and fine as it ever was, maybe finer. Hemingway's famously plain declarative sentences linger in the mind like poetry: "Brett was damned good-looking. She wore a slipover jersey sweater and a tweed skirt, and her hair was brushed back like a boy's. She started all that." His cast of thirtysomething dissolute expatriates--Brett and her drunken fiancé, Mike Campbell, the unhappy Princeton Jewish boxer Robert Cohn, the sardonic novelist Bill Gorton--are as familiar as the "cool crowd" we all once knew. No wonder this quintessential lost-generation novel has inspired several generations of imitators, in style as well as lifestyle.

Jake Barnes, Hemingway's narrator with a mysterious war wound that has left him sexually incapable, is the heart...



For Whom the Bell Tolls
Ernest Hemingway
0684803356
January 1968
Paperback
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Book Review
For Whom the Bell Tolls begins and ends in a pine-scented forest, somewhere in Spain. The year is 1937 and the Spanish Civil War is in full swing. Robert Jordan, a demolitions expert attached to the International Brigades, lies "flat on the brown, pine-needled floor of the forest, his chin on his folded arms, and high overhead the wind blew in the tops of the pine trees." The sylvan setting, however, is at sharp odds with the reason Jordan is there: he has come to blow up a bridge on behalf of the antifascist guerrilla forces. He hopes he'll be able to rely on their local leader, Pablo, to help carry out the mission, but upon meeting him, Jordan has his doubts: "I don't like that sadness, he thought. That sadness is bad. That's the sadness they get before they quit or before they betray. That is the sadness that comes...


The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico 1517-1521
Bernal Diaz del Castillo
030681319X
Feb 2004
Paperback
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New York Times
"The most complete and trustworthy of the chronicles of the Conquest."

New York Times
"The most complete and trustworthy of the chronicles of the Conquest."

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The Portugal Story
John DOS Passos
0385513631
Mar 1995
Paperback
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The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain
Maria Rosa Menocal
0316168718
April 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
María Rosa Menocal's wafting, ineffably sad The Ornament of the World tells of a time and place--from 786 to 1492, in Andalucía, Spain--that is largely and unjustly overshadowed in most historical chronicles. It was a time when three cultures--Judaic, Islamic, and Christian--forged a relatively stable (though occasionally contentious) coexistence. Such was this period that there remains in Toledo a church with an "homage to Arabic writing on its walls [and] a sumptuous 14th-century synagogue built to look like Granada's Alhambra." Long gone, however, is the Córdoba library--a thousand times larger than any other in Christian Europe. Menocal's history is one of palatine cities, of philosophers, of poets whose work inspired Chaucer and Boccaccio, of weeping fountains, breezy courtyards, and a long-running...


History of Spain
Peter Pierson
0313302723
January 1999
Textbook Hardcover
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Review
“Pierson's writing style is clear and concise. The book is recommended for all types of libraries as a good, brief introduction to all of Spain's history.”–American Reference Books Annual

Book Description
Every school and public library should update its resources on Spain with this lively and succinct narrative of Spain's long and rich historical experience. Emphasizing people rather than abstract developments, this narrative makes Spanish history readable and engaging. Based on the most recent scholarship, it examines the politics, society, economy, and culture of Spain chronologically, focusing on the last two centuries. Pierson, a noted authority on Spanish history, traces Spain's foundations in the Roman empire and Muslim conquest to its golden age in the late...


A Concise History of Portugal
David Birmingham
0521536863
Nov 2003
Paperback
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Review
'... standard reading for all those seeking an insight into the historical evolution of this remarkable country.' The Times Higher Education Supplement
'... a highly accessible and weighty study... unlikely to be superseded for some time.' History Today

Review
"Standard reading for all those seeking an insight into the historical evolution of this remarkable country." Times Higher Education Supplement

"A modern account and the first to be written in ENglish since the termination of dictatorship. No international history series can be considered complete without this...edition." Library Bookwatch

See all Editorial Reviews



Ferdinand and Isabella
John Edwards
0582218160
Nov 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
This book shows how Ferdinand and Isabella exercised power at work as a ruling couple, probably unique in European history, with a heady mixture of culture and intolerance. 2004 is the anniversary of Isabella's death. It focuses on powerful personalities, which had an impact on whole societies in Europe and America. The combination of the exercise of power with royal and religious ideology. Its focus on the often painful interaction between Christians, Jews and Muslims and their respective religions: this is highly topical, as is the whole region. This book is about a couple, not a single, dominant ruler. Thus it raises issues of gender, and the dynamics of a marriage over thirty-five years, as well as the practice of monarchical power. The reader sees Ferdinand and Isabella struggle to establish their...


Sharpe's Battle: Spain 1811
Bernard Cornwell
0060932287
August 1, 1999
Paperback
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Washington Post
"Combines those strengths that have come to characterize Bernard Cornwell's fiction'immaculate historical reconstruction and the ability to tell a ripping yarn."

From AudioFile
Captain Richard Sharpe commits a political blunder and may be court-martialed. Wellington makes a tactical blunder, however, and Sharpe helps win a victory in spite of it. Sharpe believes a soldier is remembered only for his last battle, and this one saves his career. William Gaminara is a remarkable narrator. Cornwell's novel relies more on description than conversation, and Gaminara manages it very well. He evokes the period, the characters, the raging conflict and engages the listener's full attention. In that era war involved personal suffering and bravery; through Gaminara's voice we feel the humor,...


Poison
Kathryn Harrison
0380727412
September 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Perhaps Harrison's most signal achievement in this story of two doomed women is her reflection of their time and place: Spain in the 17th century, a sordid and barbarous era. Harrison (Exposure) is totally in command of her tragic narrative, which proceeds with the stately, mesmerizing pace of a pavane, stepping to one side to look behind, to the other to look ahead. Francesca Luarca, a humble silk farmer's daughter, is arrested for witchery. Her story parallels that of Queen Maria Luisa, the French Bourbon princess married to the impotent king of Spain, whose inability to produce an heir to the throne condemns her to death as surely as imprisonment in the Inquisition's prisons dooms Francesca. Francesca commits several sins: she begs a priest to teach her to read (a dangerous ambition for a woman); he also...


Homage to Catalonia
George Orwell
0156421178
October 1969
Paperback
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Book Review
"I wonder what is the appropriate first action when you come from a country at war and set foot on peaceful soil. Mine was to rush to the tobacco-kiosk and buy as many cigars and cigarettes as I could stuff into my pockets." Most war correspondents observe wars and then tell stories about the battles, the soldiers and the civilians. George Orwell--novelist, journalist, sometime socialist--actually traded his press pass for a uniform and fought against Franco's Fascists in the Spanish Civil War during 1936 and 1937. He put his politics and his formidable conscience to the toughest tests during those days in the trenches in the Catalan section of Spain. Then, after nearly getting killed, he went back to England and wrote a gripping account of his experiences, as well as a complex analysis of the political machinations that led...


The Day It Snowed Tortillas / El Dia Que Nevo Tortilla
Joe Hayes
0938317768
Oct 2003
(Paperback) - Spanish
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Book Description
Kids of all ages are always asking Joe Hayes, "How can it snow tortillas?" Well, now they'll know where to find the answer-at long last, Joe's signature book The Day It Snowed Tortillas is appearing in this new bilingual edition. Bloomsbury Review listed the original English-only edition as one of their fifteen all-time favorite children's books. Our bilingual edition has all the original stories as they have evolved in the last twenty years of Joe's storytelling. It also has new illustrations by award-winning artist Antonio Castro. Storytellers have been telling these stories in the villages of New Mexico since the Spanish first came to the New World over four hundred years ago, but Joe always adds his own nuances for modern audiences. The tales are full of magic and fun. In the title story, for instance, a very...


Brutal Journey : The Epic Story of the First Crossing of North America
Paul Schneider
080506835X
May 2, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Despite his failure to suppress the rebellious Cortés in Mexico, would-be conquistador Pánfilo de Narváez was given another chance by the king of Spain, who awarded him governorship over the entire Gulf Coast of the modern United States. But Narváez's luck was no better this time: the expedition, which arrived in 1528, was a complete disaster. Out of the 400 men who went ashore in Florida, only four made it to Mexico eight years later, long after Narváez himself was lost at sea in a makeshift boat. Schneider (The Adirondacks) has only two firsthand documents to work with, but he ably combines the raw narrative with a wealth of secondary research to create a vivid tale filled with gripping scenes, as when natives lead the starving Spanish forces into a swamp ambush. Though...


Personal Writings (Penguin Classics)
Ignatius of Loyola, et al
0140433856
January 1, 1997
Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Latin

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