Book Finder
    
 
> History > Europe History > Yugoslavia History
 

Black Lamb and Grey Falcon: A Journey through Yugoslavia
Rebecca West
0140188479
April 1995
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Part travelogue, part history, part love letter on a thousand-page scale, Rebecca West's Black Lamb and Grey Falcon is a genre-bending masterwork written in elegant prose. But what makes it so unlikely to be confused with any other book of history, politics, or culture--with, in fact, any other book--is its unashamed depth of feeling: think The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire crossed with Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. West visited Yugoslavia for the first time in 1936. What she saw there affected her so much that she had to return--partly, she writes, because it most resembled "the country I have always seen between sleeping and waking," and partly because "it was like picking up a strand of wool that would lead me out of a labyrinth in which, to my surprise, I had found myself immured." Black Lamb is the chronicle of...


Balkans: A Short History
Mark Mazower
081296621X
August 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The Balkan wars of the 1990sDwhich Mazower persuasively calls a civil warDreinforced the meaning of the word "Balkan": the meaning that has little to do with geography or even ideology, yet everything with a violent way of life. The main challenge of this work is to denounce this one-dimensional Western stereotype and to approach the crisis of the Balkan lands "without seeing them refracted through the prism of 'the Balkans.'" Mazower, professor of history at Princeton and author of Dark Continent: Europe's Twentieth Century, has written a concise history of Europe's troubled southeastern corner that is both sympathetic to the region's never-ending struggle for identity and freedom from invaders and critical of its inhabitants' recurring failure to reconcile the religious and cultural differences imposed on them...


The Disuniting of America: Reflections on a Multicultural Society
Arthur M. Schlesinger
0393318540
September 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In this updated version of a modern classic, acclaimed historian Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. strikes a blow against radical multiculturalism. The rising cult of ethnicity, he argues, threatens a common American identity, imperiling the civic ideals that traditionally have bonded immigrants into a nation. Various chapters criticize bilingual education, Afrocentrism, and the use of history as group therapy for minorities. Schlesinger raised eyebrows when he first published this book in 1992 because of his impeccable liberal credentials as a one-time assistant to President Kennedy and long-standing academic champion of FDR's New Deal. This new version contains all of the original volume's edge, plus a few extras, including an appendix containing "Schlesinger's Syllabus," 13 books "indispensable to an...


This Was Not Our War
Swanee Hunt
0822333554
Nov 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Drawing on seven years of interviews, diplomatic and humanitarian work in the region and personal visits to Bosnia throughout the 1990s, Hunt—a former U.S. ambassador to Austria and founder of Women Waging Peace—presents the testimony of 26 women who survived the region's horrific upheavals. Hunt juxtaposes private moments with public meetings and differences of opinion with common convictions. Women speak wrenchingly and courageously about the fight to save their homes and protect their children; the decision to stay or flee; the attempt to preserve their own bodies and souls; and the ongoing challenge to rebuild their lives and society. (The book includes 32 color photos and two maps.) Despite differences of opinion on most other issues, Hunt's ethnically and religiously diverse interviewees all...


Romania
Nicolae Klepper
0781809355
May 2002
Paperback
·
 


Balkan Ghosts: A Journey through History
Robert D. Kaplan
0312424930
May 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
From the assassination that triggered World War I to the ethnic warfare now sweeping Serbia, Bosnia, and Croatia, the Balkans have been the crucible of the twentieth century, the place where terrorism and genocide first became tools of policy.

This enthralling and often chilling political travelogue fully deciphers the Balkans' ancient passions and intractable hatreds for outsiders. For as Kaplan travels among the vibrantly-adorned churches and soul-destroying slums of the former Yugoslavia, Albania, Romania, Bulgaria, and Greece, he allows us to see the region's history as a time warp in which Slobodan Milosevic becomes the reincarnation of a fourteenth-century Serbian martyr; Nicolae Ceaucescu is called "Drac," or "the Devil"; and the one-time Soviet Union turns out to be a continuation of the Ottoman Empire. ...



To Kill a Nation: The Attack on Yugoslavia
Michael Parenti
1859843662
September 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
For 78 days in 1999, the United States and NATO forces responded to the violence in Kosovo by conducting aerial attacks against Yugoslavia. Parenti gives an unabashedly critical assessment of this intervention, based on a solid and passionate rejection of Western leaders' "lies" about events in the Balkans and Western interests in that part of the world. Readers not familiar with his leftist analysis may find Parenti's dismissal of NATO's justification for its 1999 bombing campaign shocking or silly; others may find it thought-provoking. He argues that Western intervention in Yugoslavia was driven not by a humanitarian desire to stop ethnic cleansing, but rather by a self-interested determination to subjugate formerly Communist countries to the forces of free-market globalization. The government-controlled media...


Dracula, Prince of Many Faces
Radu R. Florescu
0316286567
Oct 1990
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
With the phenomenal success of Elizabeth Kostova+s critically acclaimed, #1 New York Times bestseller, The Historian, there is a renewed interest in the true story of Dracula. Originally published in 1990, Dracula, Prince of Many Faces still stands as the definitive biography of Vlad Dracula of Romania.Dracula, Prince of Many Faces reveals the extraordinary life and times of the infamous Vlad Dracula of Romania (1431-1476), nicknamed the Impaler. Dreaded by his enemies, emulated by later rulers like Ivan the Terrible, honored by his countrymen even today, Vlad Dracula was surely one of the most intriguing figures to have stalked the corridors of European and Asian capitals in the fifteenth century. In this definitive biography covering Vlad Dracula+s life and subsequent legend, readers will discover that life can truly...


Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World
Margaret MacMillan
0375760520
September 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A joke circulating in Paris early in 1919 held that the peacemaking Council of Four, representing Britain, France, the U.S. and Italy, was busy preparing a "just and lasting war." Six months of parleying concluded on June 28 with Germany's coerced agreement to a treaty no Allied statesman had fully read, according to MacMillan, a history professor at the University of Toronto, in this vivid account. Although President Wilson had insisted on a League of Nations, even his own Senate would vote the league down and refuse the treaty. As a rush to make expedient settlements replaced initial negotiating inertia, appeals by many nationalities for Wilsonian self-determination would be overwhelmed by rhetoric justifying national avarice. The Italians, who hadn't won a battle, and the French, who'd been saved from...


Scott O'Grady
Barbara A. Somervill
0516243322
Sept 2003
Hardcover
·
 


Origins of a Catastrophe : Yugoslavia and Its Destroyers- -America's Last Ambassador Tells What Happened an d Why
Warren Zimmerman
0812933036


·
 
Book Review
Warren Zimmermann was the American ambassador to Yugoslavia from 1989 to 1992, the period when the breakup of the Soviet empire caused the Balkans to slide into war. In this candid insider's account he recounts the failures of American and European diplomacy to prevent a catastrophe that was, according to Zimmerman, not only foreseeable but entirely preventable. The most chilling pages in this book depict Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic, who looked the ambassador in the eye, puffed on his Italian cigarillos, and stated that "Serbia has nothing to do with Bosnia." Now, as U.S. troops prepare to pull out of Bosnia by the end of 1996, Zimmermann's memoir paints a bleak future for this war-torn corner of Eastern Europe. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From...


Yugoslavia: Death of a Nation
Laura Silber
0140262636
December 1996
Paperback
·
 
The New York Times Book Review, Chris Hedges
. . . one of the finest volumes to come out of the war . . .


The Ransom of the Jews
Radu Ioanid
1566635624
Feb 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Ioanid (The Holocaust in Romania) sheds light on an extraordinary, little-known and shameful episode that explains some mysteries of international affairs, such as why Romania was the only Soviet bloc country to maintain relations with Israel after the Six-Day War. Drawing on interviews and on highly classified Romanian documents, Ioanid relates how Romania in the 1950s and '60s demanded payments in cash and goods from Israel in exchange for the emigration of Romanian Jews to the Jewish state. A historian at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, Ioanid places these events in the context of a cash-starved Romania, turning away from Russia and eager for Western trade, oil-drilling equipment and agricultural goods. In the late 1960s, the human trade allowed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his family to build their...


Impossible Histories : Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991
Dubravka Djuric (Editor), Misko Suvakovic (Editor)
0262541890
April 1, 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Impossible Histories is the first critical survey of the extraordinary experiments in the arts that took place in the former Yugoslavia from the country's founding in 1918 to its breakup in 1991. The combination of Austro-Hungarian, French, German, Italian, and Turkish influences gave Yugoslavia's avant-gardes a distinct character unlike those of other Eastern and Central European avant-gardes. Censorship and suppression kept much of the work far from the eyes and ears of the Yugoslav people, while language barriers and the inaccessibility of archives caused it to remain largely unknown to Western scholars. Even at this late stage in the scholarly investigation of the avant-garde, few Westerners have heard of the movements Belgrade surrealism, signalism, Yugo-Dada, and zenitism; the groups Alfa, Exat 51,...


Liberated Cinema: The Yugoslav Experience, 1945-2001
Daniel J. Goulding
025321582X
January 2003
Paperback
·
 


Slovenia
Tamra B. Orr
0516242490
Mar 2004
Hardcover
·
 


The Serbs : History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia, Second Edition
Tim Judah
0300085079
August 11, 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The recent war in Bosnia re-ignited ancient hatreds and led to acts of brutality that echoed World War II atrocities: large-scale massacres and "ethnic cleansing". Bosnian Serbs, aided by Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic, systematically murdered, raped, and terrorized Bosnian Muslims as they strove to create a Greater Serbia. Now, journalist Tim Judah provides some perspective on the horrors of the Bosnian conflict with The Serbs. Make no mistake, Judah is not an apologist for Serbian excesses; rather, he aims to explicate the Balkans' long and violent history leading to this latest tragic conflict. The Serbs begins with the establishment of a Serbian state in the Middle Ages, then follows Serb fortunes through ensuing centuries of conquest, conflict, and oppression. Ethnic cleansing in the Balkans is...


The Collapse of Yugoslavia 1991-1999 (Essential Histories Series)
Alastair Finlan
1841768057
November 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
In 1991, an ethnically diverse region that had enjoyed decades of peaceful coexistence descended into bitter hatred and chaos, almost overnight. Communities fractured along lines of ethnic and religious affiliation and the ensuing fighting was deeply personal, resulting in brutality, rape and torture, and ultimately the deaths of thousands of people. This book examines the internal upheavals of the former Yugoslavia and their international implications, including the failure of the Vance-Owen plan; the first use of NATO in a combat role and in peace enforcement; and the war in Kosovo, unsanctioned by the UN but prosecuted by NATO forces to prevent the ethnic cleansing of the region.

From the Publisher
This unique series studies every major war in history looking at all the...


The Bridge Betrayed : Religion and Genocide in Bosnia (Comparative Studies in Religion and Society)
Michael A. Sells
0520216628
December 10, 1998
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
A Serbian American professor of religion, Sells (Mystical Languages of Unsaying, Univ. of Chicago, 1994) explores all angles surrounding the recent systematic destruction of the Bosnian Muslims. He lays down a solid background of the origins of the war and explains the Serbian attitude that religion equals nationality, which shows why the Serbs believe the Muslims are traitorous to their country. Sells also describes Croatia's role in the conflict. Along with some fascinating reports and details on the genocide, he spends the final two chapters blasting the UN, NATO, and the West for not becoming more involved in stopping the crimes against the Bosnians. His work is recommended for all academic and large public libraries for its ability to explain this confusing war clearly.?Jill Jaracz, Professionals Lib. Service,...


The Politics of Duplicity
Gail Kligman
0520210751
July 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The political hypocrisy and personal horrors of one of the most repressive anti-abortion regimes in history came to the world's attention soon after the fall of Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. Photographs of orphans with vacant eyes, sad faces, and wasted bodies circled the globe, as did alarming maternal mortality statistics and heart-breaking details of a devastating infant AIDS epidemic. Gail Kligman's chilling ethnography--of the state and of the politics of reproduction--is the first in-depth examination of this extreme case of political intervention into the most intimate aspects of everyday life.
Ceausescu's reproductive policies, among which the banning of abortion was central, affected the physical and emotional well-being not only of individual men, women, children, and families but also of society...


My Inventions: The Autobiography of Nikola Tesla
Nikola Tesla
1557423636
September 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Originally published in 1919 in Electrical Experimenter magazine, here are Nikola Tesla's reflections on his early years and work.

Download Description
Originally published in 1919 in Electrical Experimenter magazine, here are Nikola Tesla's reflections on his early years and work.

See all Editorial Reviews


War Hospital
Sheri Fink
158648267X
Nov 2004
Paperback
·
 
The Washington Post Book World
"Sheri Fink is...a superb chronicler."

Good Housekeeping
"A moving account of medical workers' experiences in the Balkans."

See all Editorial Reviews


Yugoslavia: A Concise History
Leslie Benson
0333792416
March 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
The fate of Yugoslavia (or what remains of Yugoslavia) can be seen as a wake-up call for the rest of Europe. After two world wars --triggered, to a large extent, by intranational and international ethnic hatreds--it was often assumed that Europe had moved beyond such petty concerns. Yugoslavia, a melange of Croats, Serbs, Slovenes, and other minorities emancipated from the ruins of the Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian Empires, seemed a success story. Yet, after the death of Tito, in 1980, the old ethnic hatreds emerged, stoked by opportunistic, nationalist politicians, including Slobodan Milosevic. Benson is professor of history at University College, Northampton, England, and his easily digestible and highly informative survey traces Yugoslav history from the birth of the nation after World War I to its ongoing dissolution...


Balkan Tragedy: Chaos and Dissolution After the Cold War
Susan L. Woodward
0815795130
April 1995
Paperback
·
 


Milosevic : Portrait of a Tyrant
Dusko Doder, Louise Branson
0684843080


·
 
From Publishers Weekly
With the hardened realism that comes from years of journalism and a first-hand knowledge of the Balkan scene, Doder and Branson (coauthor of Gorbachev) have written a vivid and scathing biography of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. During the past decade of war and chaos in the former Yugoslavia, the central figure amid the devastation has been Milosevic, yet he has remained a mystery, "drawing a veil around his persona." In their masterful expos?, in which they charge Milosevic with causing the Balkan crises of the 1990s, Doder and Branson, a husband-and-wife team, draw a portrait of a man with "demons in his soul," filled with "the intoxication... of genuine popularity," who used that popularity to grab power. They take us from his youth in WWII and postwar Serbia, through his rise in Communist circles...


Footprint Croatia
Jane Foster
1903471796
July 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Drawn by Croatia's dramatic landscape of rugged mountains, clear blue sea, and historic Venetian towns along the coast, the number of visitors to this fascinating Eastern European country continues to increase. Revised and redesigned, this new edition covers Zagreb and inland Croatia, Istria, Kvarner, and North, Central, and South Dalmatia. It provides practical information on where to stay, from hotels and pensions to "Robinson Crusoe" accommodations on uninhabited islands and newly restored lighthouses. Author Jane Foster, a resident of Croatia for more than five years, offers an insider's advice on sailing the Croatian coast -- the best way to see it -- with its beautiful bays and islands. She covers Croatian treasures such as Dubrovnik and Split, as well as the best beaches (including naturist spots) and water...


Yugoslavia: A Concise History
Leslie Benson
1403915660
August 2003
Textbook Paperback
·
 
From Booklist
The fate of Yugoslavia (or what remains of Yugoslavia) can be seen as a wake-up call for the rest of Europe. After two world wars --triggered, to a large extent, by intranational and international ethnic hatreds--it was often assumed that Europe had moved beyond such petty concerns. Yugoslavia, a melange of Croats, Serbs, Slovenes, and other minorities emancipated from the ruins of the Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian Empires, seemed a success story. Yet, after the death of Tito, in 1980, the old ethnic hatreds emerged, stoked by opportunistic, nationalist politicians, including Slobodan Milosevic. Benson is professor of history at University College, Northampton, England, and his easily digestible and highly informative survey traces Yugoslav history from the birth of the nation after World War I to its ongoing dissolution...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.