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The Gay Talese Reader : Portraits and Encounters
Gay Talese, Barbara Lounsberry (Introduction)
0802776752
October 1, 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
If there is one fault in this wonderful and long overdue collection of nonfiction master Talese's magazine writings, it's that there is simply not enough. While this reader does not include selections from such bestselling books as The Kingdom and the Power (a look at the New York Times, where he was a reporter for 10 years), Honor Thy Father (his behind-the-scenes look at the Bonanno crime organization) or Thy Neighbor's Wife (his examination in the shift of sexual mores in the decades before AIDS), it does highlight writing from his 1993 bestselling book, Unto the Sons, which deals with his Italian-born father's journey to America. However, all of the essays collected here are priceless gems, including his classic profiles of 20th-century icons such as Joe DiMaggio ("The Silent Season of the Hero"); the...


Why Marriage
George Chauncey
0465009581
Dec 2005
Paperback
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From Booklist
Chauncey says this short book, written on a three-month deadline and between two long-gestating big books, was a challenge, and his strain shows in some poor and question-begging wording. Nevertheless, this is a swell, partisan, but not particularly argumentative U.S. gay-rights history primer, which makes at least two big points that need to be common knowledge. The first is that active antigay repression is largely a twentieth-century phenomenon; strong antigay law enforcement and many of the laws themselves date from the 1930s and became harsher and spread after World War II. The other is that marriage became a primary gay-rights goal because of AIDS and gay efforts to adopt, for AIDS patients' partners were barred from them in hospitals and stripped of jointly held property after they died, and gays wishing to share...


Rent
Jonathan Larson
0688154379
January 1997
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
This is by far the must-get theater book of the year. With dazzling punk graphics that will quickly win book industry awards, the volume contains the entire libretto of the Tony- and Pulitzer-winning musical about love and loyalty among starving AIDS-stricken artists in New York's East Village. But editors Evelyn McDonnell and Katherine Silberger wisely understand that the story of the show's creation is as compelling as the musical itself--so more than half of this volume is devoted to an oral history of the composer/lyricist/librettist Jonathan Larson, who came to New York hoping to revolutionize musical theater--then died of an aortic aneurysm the night of the show's final preview. It's an event book for an event musical.

-- Time
"The most exuberant and original American musical...


Lord John and the Private Matter
Diana Gabaldon
0385337485
October 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Trouble befalls Lord John Grey (fresh from minor roles in Gabaldon's bestselling Outlander novels) when he accidentally discovers that the Hon. Joseph Trevelyan, his cousin's betrothed, may have what those in 1757 termed "the pox" or "the French disease" syphilis. Before he can figure out an appropriate way to handle this delicate matter, he becomes involved in the investigation of the mysterious and grisly murder of a military colleague suspected of being a spy. Gabaldon (The Fiery Cross; Drums of Autumn; etc.) stitches these two plots together into a compelling narrative that also offers a wealth of juicy details about 18th-century London, especially its homosexual underbelly. Lord John, who reminisces about his dead lover, Hector, and the "lean, hard body" of an old flame, learns that Trevelyan may be...


Basic Writings of Nietzsche (Modern Library Classics)
Friedrich Nietzsche, et al
0679783393
November 28, 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
A better title for this book might be The Indispensable Writings of Nietzsche. Indeed, the six selections contained in Walter Kaufmann's volume are not only critical elements of Nietzsche's oeuvre, they are must-reads for any aspiring student of philosophy. Those coming to Nietzsche for the first time will be pleased to find three of his best-known works--The Birth of Tragedy, Beyond Good and Evil, and On the Genealogy of Morals--as well as a collection of 75 aphorisms drawn from Nietzsche's celebrated aphoristic work. In addition, there are two lesser known, but important, pieces in The Case of Wagner and Ecce Homo. Kaufmann's lucid and accurate translations have been the gold standard of Nietzsche scholarship since the 1950s, and this volume does not disappoint.

Anyone who has slogged their way through the swamps of...



Beyond Shame
Patrick Moore
0807079561
Jan 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A talented novelist who for many years was director of the Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, Moore (This Every Night) offers a provocative defense of gay male sex culture in the 1970s as well as a jeremiad on the AIDS holocaust of the 1980s. The most exciting writing here details New York's provisional "theaters of pleasure" (sex clubs like The Mineshaft, dance clubs such as The Saint) with novelistic atmosphere and a canny ear for interview and synthesis, while Moore's portraits of artists lost to AIDS are also first-rate. Writers Cookie Mueller and Assotto Saint emerge as more interesting than their work, while the late David Wojnarowicz's memoir in particular is vaunted. Art world hackles will rise at Moore's unsympathetic account of gallerist Andrea Rosen's administration of the Felix Gonzalez-Torres...


A Natural History of Homosexuality
Francis Mark Mondimore
0801854407
October 30, 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
It takes courage to add yet another title to the plethora of current titles about homosexuality, but Mondimore, a practicing psychiatrist from Charlotte, N.C., offers a valuably balanced study written in clear language. Above all, he has no axes to grind. Too often, bookshop shelves offer works written only for an inner circle of gay readers, but the present study is expressly meant for those not in the know on subjects like the historical persecution of gays, the psychology and biology of homosexuality, social issues like "stigma management" and even the thorny problems of transsexualism and transvestitism. Mondimore notes that, in dozens of American states, anti-homosexuality laws are still on the books; he points out, too, that Germany has never paid reparations to the 50,000 gays put into concentration camps...


Dry: A Memoir
Augusten Burroughs
0312423799
April 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Fans of Augusten Burroughs's darkly funny memoir Running with Scissors were left wondering at the end of that book what would become of young Augusten after his squalid and fascinating childhood ended. In Dry, we find that although adult Augusten is doing well professionally, earning a handsome living as an ad writer for a top New York agency, Burroughs's personal life is a disaster. His apartment is a sea of empty Dewar's bottles, he stays out all night boozing, and he dabs cologne on his tongue in an unsuccessful attempt to mask the stench of alcohol on his breath at work. When his employer insists he seek help, Burroughs ships out to Minnesota for detoxification, counseling, and amusingly told anecdotes about the use of stuffed animals in group therapy. But after a month of such treatment, he's back in Manhattan and...


Beyond Shame
Patrick Moore
080707957X
Jan 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A talented novelist who for many years was director of the Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, Moore (This Every Night) offers a provocative defense of gay male sex culture in the 1970s as well as a jeremiad on the AIDS holocaust of the 1980s. The most exciting writing here details New York's provisional "theaters of pleasure" (sex clubs like The Mineshaft, dance clubs such as The Saint) with novelistic atmosphere and a canny ear for interview and synthesis, while Moore's portraits of artists lost to AIDS are also first-rate. Writers Cookie Mueller and Assotto Saint emerge as more interesting than their work, while the late David Wojnarowicz's memoir in particular is vaunted. Art world hackles will rise at Moore's unsympathetic account of gallerist Andrea Rosen's administration of the Felix Gonzalez-Torres...


And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic
Randy Shilts, William Greider (Introduction)
0312241356
April 9, 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
In the first major book on AIDS, San Francisco Chronicle reporter Randy Shilts examines the making of an epidemic. Shilts researched and reported the book exhaustively, chronicling almost day-by-day the first five years of AIDS. His work is critical of the medical and scientific communities' initial response and particularly harsh on the Reagan Administration, who he claims cut funding, ignored calls for action and deliberately misled Congress. Shilts doesn't stop there, wondering why more people in the gay community, the mass media and the country at large didn't stand up in anger more quickly. The AIDS pandemic is one of the most striking developments of the late 20th century and this is the definitive story of its beginnings. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

...


Making Gay History
Eric Marcus
0060933917
June 2002
Paperback
·
 
Booklist
"An ambitious project well realized…smooth-reading text that will surely become a cornerstone of gay American studies."

Publishers Weekly
"[Making History] is a testament to the courage of individuals who have effected a positive change in our society."

See all Editorial Reviews


Happiness: A History
Darrin M. McMahon
0871138867
January 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Before the contemporary onslaught of therapeutic treatments and self-help guidance, the very idea of happiness in this life was virtually unknown. In this eminently readable work, McMahon (Enemies of Enlightenment) looks back through 2,000 years of thought, searching for evidence of how our contemporary obsession came to be. From the tragic plays of ancient Greece to the inflammatory rhetoric of Rousseau and Thomas Jefferson's Declaration of Independence, McMahon delves deeply into the rich trove of texts that elucidate and confirm the development of Western notions of this elusive ideal. In one particularly rousing section, he highlights the breakthrough thinking of German theologian and religious revolutionary Martin Luther. Locked in self-imposed exile in the Augustine Black Monastery in Wittenberg, Luther...


Sex Between Men
Douglas Sadownick
0062512692
June 1997
Paperback
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From Kirkus Reviews
A superfluous survey of gay men's approaches to sexual behavior over the past 50 years. Sadownick (Sacred Lips of the Bronx, 1994) has combed the archives of modern gay history in search of specific accounts of sexual liaisons and examples of the shifting mindsets of successive generations of gay men. Beginning with ex-GIs' memoirs of WW II barracks assignations, he relates anecdotes of furtive, fearful cruising in YMCAs, parks, and public toilets during the postwar years, when perpetual threats of police entrapment and arrest kept nearly all gay men closeted. Having established quickly that gay sex in the '50s and '60s was a generally shadowy business, Sadownick fills in the pre-Stonewall period with alternately pointless and overfamiliar anecdotes about the early gay-rights activists, Allen Ginsberg's poetry, and...


Victorian Style: Classic Homes of North America
Cheri Y. Gay
0762413123
March 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
North American Victorian architecture and interior design are explored in detail in this essential look at an enduring style. Packed with spectacular original photographs and informative text, this lively book opens a door to the ornate decorative past. It examines the architecture of this eclectic period as it has survived and is interpreted today, and explains through myriad examples how Victorian style can be recreated in every room of the house.


Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
John Berendt
0679751521
July 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
John Berendt's Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil has been heralded as a "lyrical work of nonfiction," and the book's extremely graceful prose depictions of some of Savannah, Georgia's most colorful eccentrics--remarkable characters who could have once prospered in a William Faulkner novel or Eudora Welty short story--were certainly a critical factor in its tremendous success. (One resident into whose orbit Berendt fell, the Lady Chablis, went on to become a minor celebrity in her own right.) But equally important was Berendt's depiction of Savannah socialite Jim Williams as he stands trial for the murder of Danny Hansford, a moody, violence-prone hustler--and sometime companion to Williams--characterized by locals as a "walking streak of sex." So feel free to call it a "true crime classic" without a trace of shame. ...


The Fabulous Sylvester : The Legend, the Music, the 70s in San Francisco
Joshua Gamson
0805072500
March 1, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In the world of that most disparaged of musical genres—disco—the subject of this biography commanded respect. By conventional standards, Sylvester James was an outsider—he was an out, gay, African-American who dressed in drag and sang with a thundering falsetto—but he found mainstream success in the late 1970s and early '80s with three Top 40 hits, Dance (Disco Heat), You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real) and I Who Have Nothing, and an international #1 sensation (Do Ya Wanna Funk). At times, Gamson's (Freaks Talk Back) extensively researched volume is a vibrant and moving oral biography, with firsthand conversations with virtually everyone who knew or worked with Sylvester, from his youth in South Central L.A. through his successful music career, to his death from AIDS in 1988 at 41. The richness...


Tipping the Velvet
Sarah Waters
1573227889
May 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
The heroine of Sarah Waters's audacious first novel knows her destiny, and seems content with it. Her place is in her father's seaside restaurant, shucking shellfish and stirring soup, singing all the while. "Although I didn't long believe the story told to me by Mother--that they had found me as a baby in an oyster-shell, and a greedy customer had almost eaten me for lunch--for eighteen years I never doubted my own oysterish sympathies, never looked far beyond my father's kitchen for occupation, or for love." At night Nancy Astley often ventures to the nearby music hall, not that she has illusions of being more than an audience member. But the moment she spies a new male impersonator--still something of a curiosity in England circa 1888--her years of innocence come to an end and a life of transformations begins.

...



Its Not Unusual
Alkarim Jivani
0253211506
Dec 1997
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
London-based journalist Jivani presents an anecdotal history of gay and lesbian life in Great Britain from the end of World War I to the present. Like Between the Acts: Lives of Homosexual Men 1885-1967 (LJ 2/15/91), this history is based on the reminiscences of contributors who were active at various times throughout the century. Unlike that book, Jivani's work includes the stories of lesbians as well as gay men. The author's goal is to present a history of regular people that looks beyond "the works of the great and the good." The result is light and interesting reading, though one must wonder whether the experiences of these 36 people are representative. Apparently, Jivani relied almost solely on the testimonies of his contributors; he provides no citations outside the bibliography. An interesting primary source...


The Gay Science : With a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs (Vintage)
Friedrich Nietzsche, Walter Kaufmann (Translator)
0394719859
January 12, 1974
Paperback
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Review
"[This book] mirrors all of Nietzsche's thought and could be related in hundreds of ways to his other books, his notes, and his letters. And yet it is complete in itself. For it is a work of art."

-- Walter Kaufmann in the Introduction

Review
"[This book] mirrors all of Nietzsche's thought and could be related in hundreds of ways to his other books, his notes, and his letters. And yet it is complete in itself. For it is a work of art."

-- Walter Kaufmann in the Introduction

See all Editorial Reviews


Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
John Berendt
0679643419
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Voodoo. Decadent socialites packing Lugars. Cotillions. With towns like Savannah, Georgia, who needs Fellini? Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil takes two narrative strands--each worthy of its own book--and weaves them together to make a single fascinating tale. The first is author John Berendt's loving depiction of the characters and rascals that prowled Savannah in the eight years it was his home-away-from-home. "Eccentrics thrive in Savannah," he writes, and proves the point by introducing Luther Diggers, a thwarted inventor who just might be plotting to poison the town's water supply; Joe Odom, a jovial jackleg lawyer and squatter nonpareil; and, most memorably, the Lady Chablis, whom you really should meet for yourself. Then, on May 2, 1981, the book's second story line commences, when Jim Williams, a...


A History of Gay Literature
Gregory Woods
0300072015
Feb 1998
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
The very idea of a unique tradition of gay-male writing began relatively recently. Early in the 20th century, homosexual writers began to write more honestly. Yet writers, both gay and straight, have written about the experience of homosexuality since ancient times. In his encyclopedic overview, Gregory Woods has knitted together a transhistorical and transcultural history--a tradition--of gay-male writing over the centuries. Using a broad but readily applicable definition of gay literature that includes works by openly gay men, works in which homosexual activity occurs, and works that manifest a gay "sensibility," Woods manages to move us from Homer to David Leavitt, from Arabic poets of the classical age to contemporary South African poetry, from closeted Victorian memoirs to AIDS literature. By its...


Persian Boy
Mary Renault
0394751019
February 1988
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
“It takes skill to depict, as Miss Renault has done, this half-man, half Courtesan who is so deeply in love with the warrior.”–The Atlantic Monthly

The Persian Boy traces the last years of Alexander’s life through the eyes of his lover, Bagoas. Abducted and gelded as a boy, Bagoas was sold as a courtesan to King Darius of Persia, but found freedom with Alexander after the Macedon army conquered his homeland. Their relationship sustains Alexander as he weathers assassination plots, the demands of two foreign wives, a sometimes-mutinous army, and his own ferocious temper. After Alexander’s mysterious death, we are left wondering if this Persian boy understood the great warrior and his ambitions better than anyone.

Inside Flap Copy
...


Queer Cowboys : And Other Erotic Male Friendships in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
Chris Packard
0312293402
April 23, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Review
"A searching and original study. Chris Packard has managed to tease out evidence of same-sex attraction in places where one would not have expected to find it."--Larry McMurtry, co-writer of the award-winning screenplay for Brokeback Mountain and author of Lonesome Dove
"Thanks, Chris Packard, for searching out eros between men in the texts that created the iconic image of the Western American hero. So 'Come back to the Raft Ag'in, Huck Honey!' and see what this scholar has found."--Jonathan Ned Katz, author, Love Stories: Sex between Men before Homosexuality


A History of Gay Literature
Gregory Woods
0300080883
Nov 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The very idea of a unique tradition of gay-male writing began relatively recently. Early in the 20th century, homosexual writers began to write more honestly. Yet writers, both gay and straight, have written about the experience of homosexuality since ancient times. In his encyclopedic overview, Gregory Woods has knitted together a transhistorical and transcultural history--a tradition--of gay-male writing over the centuries. Using a broad but readily applicable definition of gay literature that includes works by openly gay men, works in which homosexual activity occurs, and works that manifest a gay "sensibility," Woods manages to move us from Homer to David Leavitt, from Arabic poets of the classical age to contemporary South African poetry, from closeted Victorian memoirs to AIDS literature. By its...


Gay and Lesbian Rights in the United States
Sidney M. Bolkosky
0313306966
Jan 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Review
“[a]n annotated collection of important source material.”–Library Journal

Book Description
The movement for gay and lesbian rights in America is a response to long-held beliefs that have, at times throughout the history of the United States, made homosexuality legally, politically, and socially unacceptable. Personal testimonies, laws, opinion pieces, court cases, and other documents encourage students to challenge their assumptions and strengthen critical thinking skills with regard to these important, volatile issues.

See all Editorial Reviews


Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940
George Chauncey
0465026214
April 1995
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Chauncey reconstructs New York's pre-WWII gay community, revealing a group that was deeply involved in the city's social and cultural scenes. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews
Historian Chauncey (Univ. of Chicago) brilliantly maps out the complex gay world of turn-of-the-century New York City. This book's publication is timed to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the uprising at the Stonewall Inn, which is often hailed as the birth of the modern gay and lesbian movement. Yet Chauncey convincingly puts Stonewall in perspective: It hardly marked the beginning of urban gay pride or nightlife. Rather than languishing in obscurity and isolation, as has long been assumed, many gay male New Yorkers thrived in close, often proud communities...


Detroit Then & Now (Then & Now (Thunder Bay Press))
Cheri Y. Gay
1571456899
November 2001
Hardcover
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Book Description
Famous the world over for automobile manufacture and the distinctive sounds of Motown music, Detroit, the Motor City, celebrates its 300th birthday in 2001. Detroit Then & Now is a fascinating look at this city's great history, taking historic photographs from the dawn of the camera age and comparing them with full-color photographs of the same scenes as they are during the Tricentennial. Despite an industrial heritage, the city has its culture including art museums, a historical museum and the Cranbrook Academy of Art, as well as a great zoological park, beaches, and marinas. With a reputation for sports and music, Detroit is as vibrant a city today as it ever has been. This book is a fascinating documentation of history and change in one of the United States' most important cities.


Who's a Pretty Boy, Then : One Hundred and Fifty Years of Gay Life in Pictures
James Gardiner
185242513X
June 1, 1998
Hardcover
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Amazon.com
James Gardiner's eclectic collection of gay male photos, postcards, play bills, theater posters, and other ephemera is an unguided tour through 100 years of gay male life and culture. Gardiner has wisely followed no specific historical or literary plan--although the photos are arranged in general chronological order--and the effect is striking. As you page through the hundreds of images, you are forced to make your own connections, construct your own sense of reality. Who's a Pretty Boy Then? is a historical and artistic tour de force that brings gay male history alive.


Rubicon: A Novel of Ancient Rome
Steven Saylor
0312971184
September 2000
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Steven Saylor's seventh installment in his Roma Sub Rosa series begins with a character saying, "Pompey will be mightily pissed." Scholars might argue that there is no evidence of this particular synonym for anger ever being used in 49 B.C., but the author would no doubt respond that poetic license includes doing whatever it takes to bridge the gap for modern audiences. And indeed, the head of the Roman Senate is mightily pissed. Rome is on the verge of another civil war, and the forces of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony have crossed the Rubicon River and are marching toward the capital. To top it all off, one of Pompey's favorite cousins has been garroted to death.

Before Pompey flees the city, he asks Rome's greatest detective, Gordianus the Finder, to solve the murder. But Pompey has reason to distrust Gordianus, who...



An Exhibit Denied
Martin Harwit
0387947973
Aug 1996
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Martin Harwit's An Exhibit Denied is a cautionary tale about what happens when politics intrudes on the objective quest for truth. The year 1995 marked the 50th anniversary of the flight of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. In preparation for that anniversary, the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum began work on an exhibit that would not only reprise the events surrounding the bombing, but would also examine the bomb's impact on people--both Japanese and American, civilian and military. Under the guidance of Martin Harwit, a former professor of astrophysics at Cornell University, the planned exhibit included, among other things, Japanese civilian artifacts from the bombing and documents showing that high-ranking military leaders such as Dwight D. Eisenhower had grave...

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