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Modern Historiography: An Introduction
Michael Bentley
0415202671
January 1999
Paperback
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Choice - July/August '99
"...astonishing: a lucid, enlightening, often witty, convincing, and pithy survey of the field since the Enlightenment."

Allan Megill, University of Virginia
"...stimulating to read...."

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Pasts Beyond Memory; Evolution, Museums, Colonialism (Museum Meanings)

0415247470


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Review
Sure to be a major intervention in museums and cultural studies...an important and provocative text....I expect this book to be as important as Birth of the Museum, which is saying something.–Ivan Karp, Emory University

Book Description
This important new work explores how evolutionary museums developed in the US, UK, and Australia in the late 19th century. This historical investigation also contributes to current debates, both on relationships between culture and the social, and to the rapidly changing practices of modern museums as they seek to shed the legacies of both evolutionary conceptions and colonial science, with the goal of contributing to the development and management of cultural diversity.


AD 1000: Living on the Brink of Apocalypse
Richard Erdoes
1566198321
September 1995
Hardcover
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Barbarism and Religion, Vol. 1: The Enlightenments of Edward Gibbon, 1737-1764

0521797594


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The New York Times Book Review, T.H. Breen
However impressive Pocock's accomplishment, Barbarism and Religion is not recommended for the intellectually faint of heart. The style is demanding, the references occasionally obscure. But even when one questions some of his conclusions ... one admires the breadth of his erudition. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review
'Pocock manages to place Gibbon within these larger cosmopolitan movements without diminishing the historian's extraordinary accomplishment.' Tim Breen, New York Times Review of Books
'Pocock the historian of political thought has not been altogether useless to Pocock the historian of Gibbon's Roman Empire.' Peter Burke, European Legacy
'... the grandeur of Pocock's conception amazes, but it is often...


To America
Stephen E. Ambrose
0743252128
Oct 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
"I am a storyteller by training and inclination," writes the late Stephen Ambrose in To America, his final book. And what a storyteller. One of the most respected and popular historians of his era, Ambrose had a passion for making the events of the past both relevant and entertaining. In these pages, he touches on many of the subjects that he devoted his career to, including presidents Eisenhower and Nixon, the journey of Lewis and Clark, the building of the transcontinental railroad, and the citizen soldiers of World War II. He also writes about his own personal story and his role as a historian. In detailing a family camping trip to Wounded Knee (an outing which directly led to his dual biography of Crazy Horse and George Armstrong Custer) or offering tips on vivid historical writing (keep your narration in chronological...


When Gods Walked the Earth (Portable Professor Series)
Peter Meineck
0760778248
October 2005
Compact Disc
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Book Description
Barnes & Noble's Portable Professor courses are, according to AudioFile Magazine, "Audio courses destined to become classics." This course covers the Greek myths in 14 lectures, ranging from the nature of Greek myth to specific myths of initiation, city, afterlife, etc. It will not only give you a working knowledge of Greek mythology, but will enlighten you as to their continuing import in today's world. A thoroughly engrossing and enchanting program.


Lies Across America
James W. Loewen
0684870673
Nov 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
Little seems to delight historian James W. Loewen, author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, more than picking apart the cherished myths of American history. Few Americans study history after high school--instead, Loewen writes, they turn to novels and Oliver Stone movies to learn about the past. And they turn to the landscape, to roadside historical markers, guidebooks, museums, and tours of battlefields, childhood homes, and massacre sites. If you were to trust those sources, Loewen suggests, you would learn, erroneously, that the first airplane flight took place not at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, but at Pittsburg, Texas. "It must be true--an impressive-looking Texas state historical marker says so!" Loewen chortles.

In these entertaining pages, Loewen takes a region-by-region tour of the United States, pointing out...



The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry into the Origins of Cultural Change
David Harvey
0631162941
October 1989
Paperback
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Book Review
The Condition of Postmodernity is David Harvey's seminal history of our most equivocal of eras. What does postmodernism mean? Where did it come from? Harvey, a professor of geography and a key mover behind extending the scope and influence of the discipline of geography itself, does a thorough job here delineating the passage through to postmodernity and the economic, social, and political changes that underscored and accompanied it. As he clearly states, the rise in postmodernist cultural forms is related to a new intensity in what Harvey terms "time-space compression," but this new intensity is a qualitative rather than quantitative change in social organization, and it does not point to an era beyond capitalism as "the basic rules of capitalistic accumulation" remain unchanged. Unlike Fredric Jameson (whose equally...


Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong
James W. Loewen
0684818868
January 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Sociology professor Loewen lambastes history textbooks as both too inaccurate and too bland to engage students. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist
When textbook gaffes make news, as with the tome that explained that the Korean War ended when Truman dropped the atom bomb, the expeditious remedy would be to fire the editor. Loewen would rather hire a new team of authors bent on the pursuit of context instead of factoids. In Loewen's ideal text, events and people illuminating the multicultural holy trinity of race, gender, and social class would predominate over the fixation on heroes and acts of government. Such is the mood adopted throughout this critique of 12 American history texts in current use. Vetting 10 topics they commonly address--from...


Lies My Teacher Told Me
James W. Loewen
1402579373
Dec 2003
Audio Compact Disc - Unabridged
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From Publishers Weekly
Loewen's politically correct critique of 12 American history textbooks-including The American Pageant by Thomas A. Bailey and David M. Kennedy; and Triumph of the American Nation by Paul Lewis Todd and Merle Curti-is sure to please liberals and infuriate conservatives. In condemning the way history is taught, he indicts everyone involved in the enterprise: authors, publishers, adoption committees, parents and teachers. Loewen (Mississippi: Conflict and Change) argues that the bland, Eurocentric treatment of history bores most elementary and high school students, who also find it irrelevant to their lives. To make learning more compelling, Loewen urges authors, publishers and teachers to highlight the drama inherent in history by presenting students with different viewpoints and stressing that history is an...


Past, Present & Personal : Teaching Writing in U.S. History
William Kashatus
0325004498
August 5, 2002
Paperback
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Review
“This book provides precise blueprints for teaching teenagers to write in U.S. history classes. It does so with spirit, self-criticism, imagination, and good humor. Above all,”–Gary B. Nash, Director, National Center for History in the Schools

Book Description
In this book, the author offers methods to move students from basic descriptive writing to more complex expository essays and term papers on history.

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Ancient Greece
F. Durando
0760722099
October 2000
Hardcover
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Amazon.com
Boasting more than 1,000 photographs, Ancient Greece: The Dawn of the Western World is an unabashed celebration of "the glory that was Greece." Archaeologist Furio Durando discusses aspects of Greek history, art, and archaeology, but the pictures do most of the work, making this a coffee-table book worth keeping. Of added interest is a set of archaeological itineraries for visitors planning a tour of ancient Greek monuments, many of which are not in Greece but in southern Italy and Sicily. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Italian --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


A Pocket Guide to Writing in History
Mary Lynn Rampolla
0312403577
Jan 2004
Paperback
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Historiography in the Twentieth Century: From Scientific Objectivity to the Postmodern Challenge
Georg G. Iggers
0819567663
November 2004
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
A broad perspective on historical thought and writing, with a new epilogue.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: German --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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END OF HISTORY AND THE LAST MAN
Francis Fukuyama
0029109752
January 31, 1992
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
History is directional, and its endpoint is capitalist liberal democracy, asserts Fukuyama, former U.S. State Department planner. In a broad, ambitious work of political philosophy, he identifies two prime forces that supposedly push all societies toward this evolutionary goal. The first is modern natural science (with its handmaiden, technology), which creates homogenous cultures. The second motor of history (which the author borrows from Hegel) is the desire for recognition, driving innovation and personal achievement. Fukuyama's main worry seems to be whether, in the coming of what he considers a capitalist utopia, we will all become complacently self-absorbed "last men" or instead revert to "first men" engaged in bloody, pointless battles. Several of the countries that he christens capitalist liberal...


Past Imperfect
Peter Charles Hoffer
1586482440
Oct 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
An adviser to the American Historical Association on plagiarism, Hoffer focuses on the four most notorious recent cases of professional historical misconduct in this useful and reasonably argued study: Michael Bellesiles's manufacturing of data in Arming America; Joseph Ellis's fabrication of a fraudulent Vietnam-era past for himself; and the documented plagiarisms of Doris Kearns Goodwin and Stephen Ambrose. In the case of Goodwin, historian Hoffer, of the University of Georgia, cites not only the much-written-about instances of copying in The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys but also the L.A. Times's investigative work showing that Goodwin plagiarized from books by Joseph Lash, Grace Tully (Franklin Roosevelt's secretary) and Hugh Gregory Gallagher when cobbling together her Pulitzer Prize–winning No Ordinary...


A Biblical History of Israel
Iain W. Provan, et al
0664220908
August 2003
Paperback
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William G. Dever, Professor Emeritus of Near Eastern Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Arizona
I cannot imagine a more honest, more comprehensive, better documented effort from a conservative perspective.

Baruch Halpern, Professor of Ancient History and Chaiken Family Chair in Jewish Studies, Penn State University
The most talented trio in the last fifty years to turn their attention to recounting the history of Israel.

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Confessor
Daniel Silva
0451211480
February 2004
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Review
Gabriel Allon, Daniel Silva's protagonist in an interesting series about a Mossad spy who doubles as an art restorer, returns in a fascinating tale of Vatican complicity in the Holocaust. Author Silva, a political journalist turned espionage writer, has done his homework on some recently unearthed documents and written a fast-paced novel that will reawaken the discussion regarding whether the Catholic Church turned a blind eye to Nazi atrocities against Jews in occupied countries during World War II, and if so, why. Allon remains an enigmatic figure whose desire for revenge against the Leopard, the assassin who killed his wife and child, compels him to put down his paints and brushes and take arms against Israel's past and present enemies. The Confessor is a solidly plotted, well-crafted story that will appeal to fans of...


She Would Not Be Moved
Herbert R. Kohl
1595580204
Sept 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Kohl argues that Rosa Parks and her role in helping to ignite the Civil Rights movement have been depicted in childrens books in ways that misrepresent and distort her decision to refuse to give up her seat on the bus so many years ago. He examined a number of school texts and childrens books about Parks. In contrast to many of them, he sees her act as one of courage, determination, and calculated risk and is critical of those books that view her behavior as being prompted by tiredness and anger. To represent her act as spontaneous and driven by weariness, he maintains, is to misunderstand who Parks really was and what her defiant stand really meant. According to Kohl, this depiction does a tremendous disservice to the black community that carried out the resulting 381-day bus boycott and to its leadership...


The Ancient Historians
Michael Grant
1566195993
September 1994
Hardcover
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Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past (Critical Perspectives on the Past)
Sam Wineburg
1566398568
April 29, 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
Since ancient times, the pundits have lamented young people's lack of historical knowledge and warned that ignorance of the past surely condemns humanity to repeating its mistakes. In the contemporary United States, this dire outlook drives a contentious debate about what key events, nations, and people are essential for history students. Sam Wineburg says that we are asking the wrong questions. This book demolishes the conventional notion that there is one true history and one best way to teach it. Although most of us think of history—and learn it—as a conglomeration of facts, dates, and key figures, for professional historians it is a way of knowing, a method for developing an understanding about the relationships of peoples and events in the past. A cognitive psychologist, Wineburg has been engaged in...


A Short Guide to Writing about History
Richard A. Marius
0321227166
Sept 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
A “must have” for students taking any history course that requires writing, A Short Guide to Writing About History stresses thinking and writing like a historian. Writing essays, resource papers, writing and researching history. Any one who writes about history.

From the Back Cover
An ideal accessory in any history course that requires writing, A Short Guide to Writing About History stresses thinking and writing like a historian. This engaging and practical little text helps the readers get beyond merely compiling dates and facts; it teaches them how to incorporate their own ideas into their papers and to tell a story about history that interests them and their peers. Covering both brief essays and the documented resource paper, this book explores...


The Discoveries: The Great Breakthroughs in 20th-Century Science, Including the Original Papers
Alan P. Lightman
0375421688
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In this enlightening collection, novelist and science writer Lightman (Einstein's Dreams) has assembled the original works announcing 25 of the world's pioneering scientific breakthroughs, coupling them with original essays to create a meditation on the "exhilaration of discovery." The lineup is a who's who of 20th-century science—Einstein, Planck, Fleming—ranging from quantum physics to astronomy, medicine, genetics and chemistry. Lightman is at his best when humanizing the scientists behind the world's major discoveries; he offers a stunning recollection from Caltech in the 1970s, when he was a graduate student, of Richard Feynman virulently attacking a world-weary Werner Heisenberg, author of the uncertainty principle, for a terrible lecture and, implicitly, for having worked on an atom bomb for...


In Command of History: Churchill Fighting and Writing the Second World War
David Reynolds
0679457437
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
For many, the fact that Churchill won his Nobel for literature comes as a surprise, but he was a prolific—and very well paid—historian and journalist. Awarded Britain's Wolfson History Prize, this highly readable book by Cambridge historian Reynolds supplies the backstory to Churchill's massive postwar publishing project: the epic The Second World War. As the author notes, he's writing "a book about personal biography and public memory," beginning with Churchill's crushing defeat in the July 1945 election and offering a unique perspective on WWII, the onset of the Cold War and Churchill's determination to write the history of the 20th century's signal conflict. But Reynolds's real achievement is his grasp of the motives behind that determination: "Churchill's sense of the fickleness of fame......


Richard Hofstadter : An Intellectual Biography
David S. Brown
0226076407
April 1, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Richard Hofstadter wrote several of the 20th century's most popular and important works of American history, but, as historian Brown reminds readers in this nuanced study, those works were as much a critique of the political culture of his own day as they were an analysis of the past. Offering brief, pointed readings of the Columbia-based thinker's books (The American Political Tradition; The Paranoid Style in American Politics) and analyses of his era's conflicts, Brown tracks Hofstadter's intellectual development as an undergraduate radical in Buffalo, an iconoclastic young professor rewriting the standard progressive history of the country, a liberal centrist at the apex of his profession and a vain protestor against the New Left and what he saw as its dangerous anti-intellectualism. As he makes a strong case...


Sleuthing the Alamo
James E. Crisp
0195163494
Nov 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
In Sleuthing the Alamo, historian James E. Crisp draws back the curtain on years of mythmaking to reveal some surprising truths about the Texas Revolution--truths often obscured by both racism and "political correctness," as history has been hijacked by combatants in the culture wars of the
past two centuries.
Beginning with a very personal prologue recalling both the pride and the prejudices that he encountered in the Texas of his youth, Crisp traces his path to the discovery of documents distorted, censored, and ignored--documents which reveal long-silenced voices from the Texan past. In each of
four chapters focusing on specific documentary "finds," Crisp uncovers the clues that led to these archival discoveries. Along the way, the cast of characters expands to include: a prominent historian who...


The Content of the Form : Narrative Discourse and Historical Representation
Hayden White
0801841151
August 1, 1990
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Here, White continues and extends the influential analysis of historical writing he began in Metahistory (1974) . He rejects the idea that history reports the past as it actually happened; narrative proceeds according to its own rules, and to use it is to adopt a certain conception of how events are organized. This conception arises not from the "facts" of history but from the nature of narrative: the "content of the form." White sees history as akin to fiction in its methods and tasks, and though he does not adequately address the status of his own workis what he writes intended to be true in a stronger sense than he allows his subjects?this is a provocative work certain to be widely read by historians, philosophers, and literary theorists. David Gordon, Social Philosophy & Policy Ctr., Bowling Green State Univ.,...


From Reliable Sources: An Introduction to Historical Methods
Martha C. Howell, Walter Prevenier
0801485606
April 2001
Paperback
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