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The Brand Gap: How to Bridge the Distance Between Business Strategy and Design
Marty Neumeier
0735713308
January 24, 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
THE BRAND GAP is the first book to present a unified theory of brand. Whereas most books on branding are weighted toward either a strategic or creative approach, this book shows how both ways of thinking can unite to produce a “charismatic brand”—a brand that customers feel is essential to their lives. In an entertaining two-hour read you’ll learn:
• a new definition of brand • the five essential disciplines of brand-building
• how branding is changing the dynamics of competition
• the three most powerful questions to ask about any brand
• why collaboration is the key to brand-building
• how design determines a customer’s experience
• how to test brand concepts quickly and cheaply
• the importance of managing...


iCon: Steve Jobs, the Greatest Second Act in the History of Business
Jeffrey S. Young
0471720836
June 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From AudioFile
Alan Sklar's skills as an actor and professional narrator rescue Young and Simon's glossy tribute to Steve Jobs, founder of Apple Computers. Sklar's polished delivery and familiar voice keep the listener interested in the recording. Without a trace of sarcasm, he is able to deliver the fawning prose sculpted by the authors. While the doting praise heaped on the entrepreneur is excessive, the book is an entertaining, nostalgic review of the pre-Internet computer industry. Sklar gives a performance superior to the quality of the text. R.F. © AudioFile 2006, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine

Review
“…getAbstract.com…recommends it highly to all business readers…” (Financial Times, 16th January 2006) ...


The History of the Personal Computer
Josepha Sherman
0531162133
Sept 2003
Paperback
·
 
Card catalog description
Discusses the inventors and scientists that contributed to the development of computers and more recently, personal computers. --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.


Art History (SparkCharts)
SparkNotes Editors
1411400534
January 2004
Paperback
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The Google Story
David Vise, Mark Malseed
055380457X
November 15, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Social phenomena happen, and the historians follow. So it goes with Google, the latest star shooting through the universe of trend-setting businesses. This company has even entered our popular lexicon: as many note, "Google" has moved beyond noun to verb, becoming an action which most tech-savvy citizens at the turn of the twenty-first century recognize and in fact do, on a daily basis. It's this wide societal impact that fascinated authors David Vise and Mark Malseed, who came to the book with well-established reputations in investigative reporting. Vise authored the bestselling The Bureau and the Mole, and Malseed contributed significantly to two Bob Woodward books, Bush at War and Plan of Attack. The kind of voluminous research and behind-the-scenes insight in which both writers specialize, and on...


Character Design Studio: Create Cutting-Edge Cartoon Figures for Comic Books, Computer Games, and Graphic Novels
Chris Patmore
0760758557
March 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Character design art book


The Medical Manager (R), Student Edition: Version 9.20 for Windows (TM)
Richard W. Gartee
0766828417
September 22, 2000
Plastic Comb
·
 
Book Description
Now in a Windows environment, this learning system introduces students to The Medical Manager, the best-selling commercial computerized medical office management software in the healthcare industry. The purpose of The Medical Manager Student Edition, Version 9.20 is to familiarize students with computerized medical account management and to help them develop the confidence and skills necessary to become a successful medical office assistant. Each section builds step-by-step on the knowledge gained from the previous unit, while introducing concepts that will be covered later in the text. Challenging practice exercises provide students with opportunities to apply this knowledge. Please Note - Requires Medical Manager Student Edition Classroom software, ISBN 0-7668-2874-3, sold separately.(KEYWORDS: Medical Manager,...


Supercade
Van Burnham
0262524201
Oct 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The generation now in its 30s pumped innumerable quarters into free-standing video consoles with protruding joysticks, steering wheels, and "fire" buttons the quaint precursors of today's dollar-based sensory overload and sleekly sophisticated home systems. Burnham, an L.A.-based Wired contributing editor and a member of the Video Arcade Preservation Society, lovingly collects screen shots of faves like Space Invaders, Pac-Man and Q*bert, along with early games like Computer Space and Pong, and home games from Atari and Nintendo. The cheeky capsule descriptions of each game from Burnham and others are matched with longer essays from writers like Julian Dibble (My Tiny Life: Crime and Passion in a Virtual World), who writes about the text-based game Adventure, and former Feed editor Steven Johnson (Emergence) on...


The Brand Gap : Revised Edition (2nd Edition)
Marty Neumeier
0321348109
August 4, 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The second edition features a 220-term brand glossary and a premium softcover binding.

THE BRAND GAP is the first book to present a unified theory of brand. Whereas most books on branding are weighted toward either a strategic or creative approach, this book shows how both ways of thinking can unite to produce a “charismatic brand”—a brand that customers feel is essential to their lives. In an entertaining two-hour read you’ll learn:

• a new definition of brand
• the five essential disciplines of brand-building
• how branding is changing the dynamics of competition
• the three most powerful questions to ask about any brand
• why collaboration is the key to brand-building
• how design determines a customer’s...


The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer (Great Discoveries)
David Leavitt
0393052362
November 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Hounded by authorities and peers alike, British mathematician Alan Turing committed suicide in 1954 by biting into a cyanide-laced apple. A groundbreaking thinker in the field of pure math, a man principally responsible for breaking the Enigma code used by the Germans during WWII and the originator of the ideas that led to the invention of the computer, Turing was also an avowed homosexual at a time when such behavior flew in the face of both convention and the law. Leavitt (The Body of Jonah Boyd) writes that the unfailingly logical Turing was so literal minded, he "neither glorified nor anthologized" his homosexuality. Educated at King's College, Cambridge, and Princeton, Turing produced the landmark paper "On Computable Numbers" in 1937, where he proposed the radical idea that machines would and could "think"...


Behind Deep Blue
Feng-Hsiung Hsu
0691118183
Jan 2004
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
In 1997, a computer developed by a team of researchers at IBM shocked the world by defeating world chess champion Gary Kasparov in a six-game match. Hsu began developing Deep Blue, the first computer to achieve such a feat, as a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University. Here he focuses on the events in his career that led to his involvement with the project. He tells the story of how the basic technical ideas took shape in the computer science department and describes the further evolution and culmination of the project at IBM. Not merely a rehashing of the engineering that was poured into creating the "mother of all chess machines," Hsu's account goes beyond the typical man vs. machine angle and attempts to capture the true essence of the contest between men in two distinct roles: Kasparov as...


Who Says Elephants Can't Dance : Inside IBM's Historic Turnaround
Louis V. Gerstner
0060523808
December 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Gerstner quarterbacked one of history's most dramatic corporate turnarounds. For those who follow business stories like football games, his tale of the rise, fall and rise of IBM might be the ultimate slow-motion replay. He became IBM's CEO in 1993, when the gargantuan company was near collapse. The book's opening section snappily reports Gerstner's decisions in his first 18 months on the job-the critical "sprint" that moved IBM away from the brink of destruction. The following sections describe the marathon fight to make IBM once again "a company that mattered." Gerstner writes most vividly about the company's culture. On his arrival, "there was a kind of hothouse quality to the place. It was like an isolated tropical ecosystem that had been cut off from the world for too long. As a result, it had spawned some...


The Universal History of Numbers
Georges Ifrah
0471393401
Jan 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The title doesn't lie. Mathematician Georges Ifrah's masterpiece, The Universal History of Numbers, is a wonderfully comprehensive overview of numbers and counting spanning all the inhabited continents as far back in time as records will allow us to look. Beyond the ancient Babylonians, Sumerians, and Indians, Ifrah takes us farther south into Africa to examine an early decimal counting system and into ancient Mexico to reconstruct what we can of the Mayan calendar and numerical system. The 27 chapters are chiefly organized by culture, though there are some cross-cultural overviews of topics like letters and numbers.

The author's aim was grand: "to provide in simple and accessible terms the full and complete answer to all and any questions ... about the history of numbers and counting, from prehistory to the age of...



Hippie
Barry Miles
1402714424
August 1, 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Biographer of Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac and the Beat Movement itself, Miles broadens his scope to the years 1965 through 1971, a time that "really was about sex and drugs and rock ’n’ roll." This massive catalog tries to cram it all in, with quotes from groovy personalities (Timothy Leary, John Lennon, Ken Kesey, Wavy Gravy, Abbie Hoffman, Grace Slick, Frank Zappa), posters and album sleeves (Buffalo Springfield, the Doors, Big Brother and the Holding Company), period photographs (antiwar protests, love-ins, mobile communes, Haight-Ashbury), and stray ephemera (a napkin from the Whiskey A Go Go). Musicians take precedence over artists: readers looking for Peter Max or R. Crumb won’t even find them in the index. Despite the tremendous assemblage, the volume lacks a coherent...


The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence
Ray Kurzweil
0140282025
January 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review Reviews
How much do we humans enjoy our current status as the most intelligent beings on earth? Enough to try to stop our own inventions from surpassing us in smarts? If so, we'd better pull the plug right now, because if Ray Kurzweil is right we've only got until about 2020 before computers outpace the human brain in computational power. Kurzweil, artificial intelligence expert and author of The Age of Intelligent Machines, shows that technological evolution moves at an exponential pace. Further, he asserts, in a sort of swirling postulate, time speeds up as order increases, and vice versa. He calls this the "Law of Time and Chaos," and it means that although entropy is slowing the stream of time down for the universe overall, and thus vastly increasing the amount of time between major events, in the eddy of...


The Government Machine
Jon Agar
0262012022
Oct 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
In The Government Machine, Jon Agar traces the mechanization of government work in the United Kingdom from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first century. He argues that this transformation has been tied to the rise of "expert movements," groups whose authority has rested on their expertise. The deployment of machines was an attempt to gain control over state action -- a revolutionary move. Agar shows how mechanization followed the popular depiction of government as machine-like, with British civil servants cast as components of a general purpose "government machine"; indeed, he argues that today's general purpose computer is the apotheosis of the civil servant.

Over the course of two centuries, government has become the major repository and user of information; the Civil Service itself can be...


Bootstrap: Lessons Learned Building a Successful Company from Scratch
Kenneth L Hess
0971187304
September 15, 2001
Hardcover
·
 
John Glynn, Professor of Entrepreneurship, Stanford Graduate School of Business
An excellent reference for anyone wondering what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

John Neer, Executive, Lockheed Martin and former Founder, Space Imaging
More than a how-to book, it is one of an entrepreneur's journey...

See all Editorial Reviews


A Bibliographic Guide to the History of Computer Applications, 1950-1990
James W. Cortada
0313298769
Jan 1996
Hardcover
·
 
Review
“Cortada's superb bibliography is organized in two periods, 1950-65 and 1966-90. In the 1950s, computers were first being introduced to business and by the early 1960s were going through the first stages of implementation...Historians of computers and technology would find this an excellent research guide.”–Choice
“Much has been written on the history of specific computer models and the companies that produced them. This bibliography goes beyond the mechanics of computers and focuses entirely on the history of how computers were used in the United States....[it] is well suited for large public and academic libraries.”–ALR

Book Description
Covering over 40 industries and dozens of applications, this is the first bibliography on the history of...


The Search: How Google and Its Rivals Rewrote the Rules of Business and Transformed Our Culture
John Battelle
1591840880
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
If you pick your books by their popularity--how many and which other people are reading them--then know this about The Search: it's probably on Bill Gates' reading list, and that of almost every venture capitalist and startup-hungry entrepreneur in Silicon Valley. In its sweeping survey of the history of Internet search technologies, its gossip about and analysis of Google, and its speculation on the larger cultural implications of a Web-connected world, it will likely receive attention from a variety of businesspeople, technology futurists, journalists, and interested observers of mid-2000s zeitgeist.

This ambitious book comes with a strong pedigree. Author John Battelle was a founder of The Industry Standard and then one of the original editors of Wired, two magazines which helped shape our early...



The Art of Computer Programming
Donald Ervin Knuth
0321335708
Feb 2006
Paperback
·
 
From the Back Cover

This multivolume work on the analysis of algorithms has long been recognized as the definitive description of classical computer science.The three complete volumes published to date already comprise a unique and invaluable resource in programming theory and practice. Countless readers have spoken about the profound personal influence of Knuth's writings. Scientists have marveled at the beauty and elegance of his analysis, while practicing programmers have successfully applied his “cookbook” solutions to their day-to-day problems. All have admired Knuth for the breadth, clarity, accuracy, and good humor found in his books.

To begin the fourth and later volumes of the set, and to update parts of the existing three, Knuth has created a series of small books called fascicles, which will be published at...



Who Says Elephants Can't Dance : Inside IBM's Historic Turnaround
Louis V. Gerstner
0060523794
November 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Gerstner quarterbacked one of history's most dramatic corporate turnarounds. For those who follow business stories like football games, his tale of the rise, fall and rise of IBM might be the ultimate slow-motion replay. He became IBM's CEO in 1993, when the gargantuan company was near collapse. The book's opening section snappily reports Gerstner's decisions in his first 18 months on the job-the critical "sprint" that moved IBM away from the brink of destruction. The following sections describe the marathon fight to make IBM once again "a company that mattered." Gerstner writes most vividly about the company's culture. On his arrival, "there was a kind of hothouse quality to the place. It was like an isolated tropical ecosystem that had been cut off from the world for too long. As a result, it had spawned some...


Apple Confidential 2.0: The Definitive History of the World's Most Colorful Company
Owen Linzmayer, Owen W. Linzmayer
1593270100
January 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Owen Linzmayer's Apple Confidential is subtitled The Real Story of Apple Computer, Inc., and while nobody will ever know the complete, "real" story about Apple, Linzmayer's is probably as close as they come. Having covered Apple news since 1980, he offers extensive insider details about Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, John Sculley, Gilbert Amelio, Bill Gates, and other major players whose lives were (and are) intertwined with Apple's history. And along the way, we also learn about lesser-known figures whose stories have remained hidden in the Apple myth: Ronald Gerald Wayne, for example, who was actually a partner with Wozniak and Jobs in the original incarnation of the company, but who sold his share when he realized he would be financially vulnerable if it should fail.

Linzmayer's tale does have a few drawbacks. Because he...



The Universal History of Numbers
Georges Ifrah
0471375683
Jan 1998
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
The title doesn't lie. Mathematician Georges Ifrah's masterpiece, The Universal History of Numbers, is a wonderfully comprehensive overview of numbers and counting spanning all the inhabited continents as far back in time as records will allow us to look. Beyond the ancient Babylonians, Sumerians, and Indians, Ifrah takes us farther south into Africa to examine an early decimal counting system and into ancient Mexico to reconstruct what we can of the Mayan calendar and numerical system. The 27 chapters are chiefly organized by culture, though there are some cross-cultural overviews of topics like letters and numbers.

The author's aim was grand: "to provide in simple and accessible terms the full and complete answer to all and any questions ... about the history of numbers and counting, from prehistory to the age of...



Code Book: The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography
Simon Singh
0385495323
August 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
People love secrets. Ever since the first word was written, humans have sent coded messages to each other. In The Code Book, Simon Singh, author of the bestselling Fermat's Enigma, offers a peek into the world of cryptography and codes, from ancient texts through computer encryption. Singh's compelling history is woven through with stories of how codes and ciphers have played a vital role in warfare, politics, and royal intrigue. The major theme of The Code Book is what Singh calls "the ongoing evolutionary battle between codemakers and codebreakers," never more clear than in the chapters devoted to World War II. Cryptography came of age during that conflict, as secret communications became critical to both sides' success.

Confronted with the prospect of defeat, the Allied cryptanalysts had worked night and day to...



CCS Coding Exam Review 2006: The Certification Step (CCS Coding Exam Review: The Certification Step (W/CD))
Carol J. Buck, Judy Trueblood-Hatcher
1416024832
April 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
This book contains all the necessary content to pass the CCS exam. It includes all the content information for the exam AND two full practice exams with answers and rationales. Using a general outline format, the text covers Anatomy, Terminology and Pathophysiology for each body area, Reimbursement Issues, and an overview of CPT, ICD-9-CM, and HCPCS Coding. It also includes a bound-in CD-ROM with a practice pre-text exam modeled after the actual AHIMA CCS certification exam along with final exam.


The Universal History of Computing
Georges Ifrah
0471396710
Oct 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
From the I Ching to AI, tremendous human brainpower has been devoted to devising easier means of counting and thinking. Former math teacher Georges Ifrah has devoted his life to tracking down traces of our early calculating tools and reporting on them with charm and verve. The Universal History of Computing: From the Abacus to Quantum Computing gives a grand title to a grand subject, and Ifrah makes good on his promise of universality by leaping far back in time and spanning all of the inhabited continents. If his scope is vast, his stories and details are still engrossing. Readers will hang on to the stories of 19th-century inventors who converged on multiplication machines and other, more general "engines," and better understand the roots of biological and quantum computation. Ifrah has great respect for our...


Barron's How to Prepare for the AP, U.S. History Advanced Placement Examination
William O. Kellogg
0764177524
August 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Added to this currently available test prep manual is a CD-ROM. It presents a practice test in the computer-based format that closely resembles actual test-taking conditions. The book presents two full-length model Advanced Placement exams in history that closely reflect recent actual exams. All questions are answered and explained. This manual also offers an extensive subject review that covers events from the Colonial era to the present day, plus detailed advice on writing the required history essay.

From the Back Cover
[back cover]

BARRON’S

HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE

AP

Advanced Placement Exam

UNITED STATES HISTORY

WITH CD-ROM

SEVENTH EDITION

Choose Barron’s Method for Test Success on the AP U.S....

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