Book Finder
    
 
> History > Jewish History > Holocaust
 

I Will Plant You a Lilac Tree : A Memoir of a Schindler's List Survivor

0689869800


·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 9 Up–In a clear, objective narrative, Hillman (called by her German name, Hannelore, in the book) describes her life from April 1942, as a student at a private school in Berlin, until the German surrender in April 1945 that freed her from a detention camp. After her father's death, she left school and was deported with her mother and brothers to Poland. During her three years of captivity she was moved to several labor and concentration camps. Her inclusion on Oskar Schindler's list led, finally, to her deportation to the Brünnlitz camp in Czechoslovakia, where Jewish prisoners were treated humanely. At the fourth detention camp–Budzyn–Hannelore met the man who would become her husband. Her growing love and concern for him; her strong instinct for survival; and her endurance in...


Night
Elie Wiesel
0553272535
Mar 1982
(Paperback) - Anniv. Ed.
·
 
Book Review
In Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a scholarly, pious teenager is wracked with guilt at having survived the horror of the Holocaust and the genocidal campaign that consumed his family. His memories of the nightmare world of the death camps present him with an intolerable question: how can the God he once so fervently believed in have allowed these monstrous events to occur? There are no easy answers in this harrowing book, which probes life's essential riddles with the lucid anguish only great literature achieves. It marks the crucial first step in Wiesel's lifelong project to bear witness for those who died.

Review
"To  the best of my knowledge no one has left behind him  so moving a record." -- Alfred...


Night
Elie Wiesel
0374500010
January 2006
Paperback
·
 
Amazon.com
In Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a scholarly, pious teenager is wracked with guilt at having survived the horror of the Holocaust and the genocidal campaign that consumed his family. His memories of the nightmare world of the death camps present him with an intolerable question: how can the God he once so fervently believed in have allowed these monstrous events to occur? There are no easy answers in this harrowing book, which probes life's essential riddles with the lucid anguish only great literature achieves. It marks the crucial first step in Wiesel's lifelong project to bear witness for those who died.

The New York Times
"A slim volume of terrifying power"

See all Editorial Reviews


Number the Stars
Lois Lowry
0440227534
Feb 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The evacuation of Jews from Nazi-held Denmark is one of the great untold stories of World War II. On September 29, 1943, word got out in Denmark that Jews were to be detained and then sent to the death camps. Within hours the Danish resistance, population and police arranged a small flotilla to herd 7,000 Jews to Sweden. Lois Lowry fictionalizes a true-story account to bring this courageous tale to life. She brings the experience to life through the eyes of 10-year-old Annemarie Johannesen, whose family harbors her best friend, Ellen Rosen, on the eve of the round-up and helps smuggles Ellen's family out of the country. Number the Stars won the 1990 Newbery Medal. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Set in Nazi-occupied Denmark in...


The Book Thief
Markus Zusak
0375831002
March 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Starred Review. Grade 9 Up–Zusak has created a work that deserves the attention of sophisticated teen and adult readers. Death himself narrates the World War II-era story of Liesel Meminger from the time she is taken, at age nine, to live in Molching, Germany, with a foster family in a working-class neighborhood of tough kids, acid-tongued mothers, and loving fathers who earn their living by the work of their hands. The child arrives having just stolen her first book–although she has not yet learned how to read–and her foster father uses it, The Gravediggers Handbook, to lull her to sleep when shes roused by regular nightmares about her younger brothers death. Across the ensuing years of the late 1930s and into the 1940s, Liesel collects more stolen books as well as a peculiar set of...


Those Who Save Us

0151010196


·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Blum, who worked for Steven Spielberg's Shoah Foundation, takes a direct, unsentimental look at the Holocaust in her first novel. The narrative alternates between the present-day story of Trudy, a history professor at a Minneapolis university collecting oral histories of WWII survivors (both German and Jewish), and that of her aged but once beautiful German mother, Anna, who left her country when she married an American soldier. Interspersed with Trudy's interviews with German immigrants, many of whom reveal unabashed anti-Semitism, Anna's story flashes back to her hometown of Weimar. As Nazi anti-Jewish edicts intensify in the 1930s, Anna hides her love affair with a Jewish doctor, Max Stern. When Max is interned at nearby Buchenwald and Anna's father dies, Anna, carrying Max's child, goes to live with a baker...


The Hiding Place
Corrie Ten Boom
0553256696
Oct 1984
Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
Corrie ten Boom was a leader in the Dutch Underground during WWII. With the aid of her family, she hid scores of Jews from the Nazi invaders. She was arrested along with every member of her family, spending the remaining war years in concentration camps. Nadia May does great credit to the writers of this true story. She reads with simplicity and a lack of histrionics. Her emotional control makes the tension and horror of the family's plight more real and hideous. Her vocal range is expansive as is her ability to speak with diverse foreign accents. The listener is left with a story of extraordinary humanity, goodness and overwhelming love. J.P. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Book Description
Corrie Ten Boom stood...


What Time And Sadness Spared: Mother And Son Confront the Holocaust

0813925134


·
 
From Booklist
Doron Ben-Atar points out in the prologue that this book is a collaboration between a Holocaust survivor and her historian son. Roma Ben-Atar came from an upper-middle- class Ashkenazi Jewish family in Warsaw and experienced the terror of concentration camps. On September 26, 1939, the Germans entered Warsaw, and Roma Ben-Atar relives the changes into a living hell of fear, hunger, and death. She relates the horrors of the camps and the Warsaw Ghetto. "The Nazis tormented and killed us in plain sight of the residents of Lublin." She was then sent to a camp when she was 16, there wavering between acceptance of death and an irrational hope that she would "somehow survive this ordeal and rebuild a life." This remarkable book is a narrative of things that happened to a young girl told by an older woman. There are the memories...


Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust
Immaculee Ilibagiza
1401908969
February 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. In 1994, Rwandan native Ilibagiza was 22 years old and home from college to spend Easter with her devout Catholic family, when the death of Rwanda's Hutu president sparked a three-month slaughter of nearly one million ethnic Tutsis in the country. She survived by hiding in a Hutu pastor's tiny bathroom with seven other starving women for 91 cramped, terrifying days. This searing firsthand account of Ilibagiza's experience cuts two ways: her description of the evil that was perpetrated, including the brutal murders of her family members, is soul-numbingly devastating, yet the story of her unquenchable faith and connection to God throughout the ordeal uplifts and inspires. Her account of the miracles that protected her is simple and vivid. Her Catholic faith shines through, but the book will...


The Diary of a Young Girl
Anne Frank
0553296981
Jan 1993
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
A beloved classic since its initial publication in 1947, this vivid, insightful journal is a fitting memorial to the gifted Jewish teenager who died at Bergen-Belsen, Germany, in 1945. Born in 1929, Anne Frank received a blank diary on her 13th birthday, just weeks before she and her family went into hiding in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. Her marvelously detailed, engagingly personal entries chronicle 25 trying months of claustrophobic, quarrelsome intimacy with her parents, sister, a second family, and a middle-aged dentist who has little tolerance for Anne's vivacity. The diary's universal appeal stems from its riveting blend of the grubby particulars of life during wartime (scant, bad food; shabby, outgrown clothes that can't be replaced; constant fear of discovery) and candid discussion of emotions familiar to every...


Survivors: True Stories Of Children In The Holocaust
Allan Zullo
0439669960
March 2005
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Book Description
These are the true-life accounts of nine Jewish boys and girls whose lives spiraled into danger and fear as the Holocaust overtook Europe. In a time of great horror, these children each found a way to make it through the nightmare of war. Some made daring escapes into the unknown, others disguised their true identities, and many witnessed unimaginable horrors. But what they all shared was the unshakable belief in-- and hope for-- survival. Their legacy of courage in the face of hatred will move you, captivate you, and, ultimately, inspire you.


I Have Lived A Thousand Years: Growing Up In The Holocaust
Livia Bitton-Jackson
0689823959
March 1999
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
PW's starred review called this memoir, of a 13-year-old Hungarian Jewish girl's incarceration in Auschwitz, "an exceptional story, exceptionally well told." Ages 12-up. Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist
Gr. 8^-12. In a graphic present-tense narrative, this Holocaust memoir describes what happens to a Jewish girl who is 13 when the Nazis invade Hungary in 1944. She tells of a year of roundups, transports, selections, camps, torture, forced labor, and shootings, then of liberation and the return of a few. For those who have read Leitner's stark The Big Lie (1992), this is a much more detailed account, with the same authority of a personal witness. Horrifying as her experience is, she doesn't dwell on the atrocities. There is hope here....


Holocaust Chronicle
John Roth (Editor)
0785329633
January 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The words will do, but the pictures are the point in this hefty and impressive reference work about the systematic murder of six million Jews. It differs from other such works in its inclusion of more than 2,000 color and black-and-white photographs from archives and private collections, and in its format: designed to highlight the photos while a timeline across the bottom of each page provides a running chronology of Holocaust-related events from 1933 to 1946. The top two-thirds of the page present two or three photographs with informative captions; the text was written by a team of historians. The result is a comprehensive account that documents a wide range of events from the hanging of five Poles in Krak?w for "aiding Jews" to the deportation of 700 Jews from Milan to Auschwitz and the Spanish government's...


Man's Search for Meaning
Viktor Emil Frankl
0671023373
Jan 1984
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl is among the most influential works of psychiatric literature since Freud. The book begins with a lengthy, austere, and deeply moving personal essay about Frankl's imprisonment in Auschwitz and other concentration camps for five years, and his struggle during this time to find reasons to live. The second part of the book, called "Logotherapy in a Nutshell," describes the psychotherapeutic method that Frankl pioneered as a result of his experiences in the concentration camps. Freud believed that sexual instincts and urges were the driving force of humanity's life; Frankl, by contrast, believes that man's deepest desire is to search for meaning and purpose. Frankl's logotherapy, therefore, is much more compatible with Western religions than Freudian psychotherapy. This is a...


Number the Stars
Lois Lowry
0440403278
Aug 1990
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The evacuation of Jews from Nazi-held Denmark is one of the great untold stories of World War II. On September 29, 1943, word got out in Denmark that Jews were to be detained and then sent to the death camps. Within hours the Danish resistance, population and police arranged a small flotilla to herd 7,000 Jews to Sweden. Lois Lowry fictionalizes a true-story account to bring this courageous tale to life. She brings the experience to life through the eyes of 10-year-old Annemarie Johannesen, whose family harbors her best friend, Ellen Rosen, on the eve of the round-up and helps smuggles Ellen's family out of the country. Number the Stars won the 1990 Newbery Medal. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Set in Nazi-occupied Denmark in...


Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
Edith Hahn Beer
068817776X
November 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Born to a middle-class, nonobservant Jewish family, Beer was a popular teenager and successful law student when the Nazis moved into Austria. In a well-written narrative that reads like a novel, she relates the escalating fear and humiliating indignities she and others endured, as well as the anti-Semitism of friends and neighbors. Using all their resources, her family bribed officials for exit visas for her two sisters, but Edith and her mother remained, due to lack of money and Edith's desire to be near her half-Jewish boyfriend, Pepi. Eventually, Edith was deported to work in a labor camp in Germany. Anxious about her mother, she obtained permission to return to Vienna, only to learn that her mother was gone. In despair, Edith tore off her yellow star and went underground. Pepi, himself a fugitive, distanced...


All But My Life
Gerda Weissmann Klein
0809015803
Mar 1995
Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
The basis for the Emmy-winning documentary ONE SURVIVOR REMEMBERS, this is the memoir of a young Polish Jewess's enslavement by the Nazis and her ultimate liberation by American soldiers. Grace Conlin takes a detached approach, affecting the pretentious fatalism that lazy actors use to represent tragic dignity. Her heroine lacks the author's endearing, transcendent life force. Otherwise, both While this narrator possesses a pleasant, expressive voice compatible with Klein's straightforward grace, her narration doesn't do justice to all the resonances of the text. Perhaps, considering the subject, that is merciful. Y.R. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Herbert Mitgang, The New York Times
"Soul-searching and human . . ....


In My Hands: Memories of a Holocaust Rescuer
Irene Gut Opdyke
0385720327
April 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
When World War II began, Irene Gutowna was a 17-year-old Polish nursing student. Six years later, she writes in this inspiring memoir, "I felt a million years old." In the intervening time she was separated from her family, raped by Russian soldiers, and forced to work in a hotel serving German officers. Sickened by the suffering inflicted on the local Jews, Irene began leaving food under the walls of the ghetto. Soon she was scheming to protect the Jewish workers she supervised at the hotel, and then hiding them in the lavish villa where she served as housekeeper to a German major. When he discovered them in the house, Gutowna became his mistress to protect her friends--later escaping him to join the Polish partisans during the Germans' retreat. The author presents her extraordinary heroism as the inevitable result of small...


Daniel's Story
Carol Matas
0590465880
Apr 1993
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 4-8-- Daniel, 14 in 1941, describes first his family's sense of belonging in Germany and their refusal to flee their country despite the initial instances of anti-Semitism they experience. By the time the family is ready to acknowledge the seriousness of their situation, no country is willing to accept them. They are first deported from Frankfurt to the Lodz ghetto in Poland; from Lodz they are sent to Auschwitz, and finally, Daniel and his father are marched to Buchenwald. They are the only two members of the family who survive, and are liberated by the Americans. Daniel tells his story through the "pictures" he has; at first real photographs, and then the images in his head. He is a courageous, sensitive, heroic individual who personalizes the events of the Holocaust. His voice rings true; he is...


Terrible Things: An Allegory of the Holocaust
Eve Bunting
0827605072
December 1995
Paperback
·
 
Church & Synagogue Libraries
"This is an excellent book for sensitizing young people of any denomination to recognize injustice."

Book Description
In this unique introduction to the Holocaust, Eve Bunting encourages young children to stand up for what they think is right, without waiting for others to join them.

See all Editorial Reviews


Jacob's Rescue: A Holocaust Story
Malka Drucker
0440409659
August 1994
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Filled with small but telling moments, this fact-based novel concerns a courageous Polish family that hides two Jewish brothers during WW II. Ages 9-12. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
Grade 5-9-- The year that she is eight, Marissa asks a fifth question at the family Passover Seder. She wants to know who the two guests are who have been staying with her family; they are participating in and enjoying the Seder, and they're "not even Jewish." The response is what her father calls a story from the heart, the story of how Alex and Mela Roslan saved him and his brother during the Holocaust. The remainder of the book is that story, set in Poland between 1941-1945. Characters are well developed and multidimensional, and the story is a...


Man's Search for Meaning
Viktor E. Frankl
0807014265
Mar 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl is among the most influential works of psychiatric literature since Freud. The book begins with a lengthy, austere, and deeply moving personal essay about Frankl's imprisonment in Auschwitz and other concentration camps for five years, and his struggle during this time to find reasons to live. The second part of the book, called "Logotherapy in a Nutshell," describes the psychotherapeutic method that Frankl pioneered as a result of his experiences in the concentration camps. Freud believed that sexual instincts and urges were the driving force of humanity's life; Frankl, by contrast, believes that man's deepest desire is to search for meaning and purpose. Frankl's logotherapy, therefore, is much more compatible with Western religions than Freudian psychotherapy. This is a...


Maus : A Survivor's Tale : My Father Bleeds History/Here My Troubles Began/Boxed [BOX SET]
Art Spiegelman
0679748407
November 1993
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Volumes I & II in paperback of this 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrated narrative of Holocaust survival.

Inside Flap Copy
Volumes I & II in paperback of this 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrated narrative of Holocaust survival.


Six Million Paper Clips: The Making Of A Children's Holocaust Memorial
Peter W. Schroeder, Dagmar Schroeder-Hildebrand
158013176X
November 1, 2004
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 4-8 -With clear and concise language, color photographs, and an attractive layout, this book tells the inspiring and touching story of the teachers, students, and community of Whitwell Middle School in Tennessee, and their quest to understand and teach about the Holocaust. The authors, White House correspondents for a group of German newspapers, helped the school publicize the project to collect six million paper clips to show just how many people were murdered and obtained a German railcar to house them. The book includes a lot of quotes and behind-the-scenes information. Footnotes help to define unfamiliar terms. While the book mentions The Diary of Anne Frank, Livia Bitton-Jackson's I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust (S & S, 1997), and Hana Volavkova's I Never Saw Another...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.