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State of War : The Secret History of the C.I.A. and the Bush Administration
James Risen
0743270665
January 3, 2006
Hardcover
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Book Review
The winter holidays are usually a quiet time for news, but the December 2005 revelations of the Bush administration's extensive, off-the-books domestic spying program by New York Times reporters James Risen and Eric Lichtblau made headline after headline, raising criticism from both sides of the aisle and an immediate, unapologetic response from President Bush himself. On the heels of those scoops comes Risen's State of War, which goes beyond his Times stories to provide a wide-ranging, if anecdotal, "secret history" of U.S. intelligence following 9/11.

Risen's description of what he says was called "the Program"--the ongoing eavesdropping operation, done with almost no judicial or congressional oversight, on the phone calls and emails of hundreds of Americans (and potentially millions more)--is only...



The Trial
Sadakat Kadri
0375505504
Aug 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Kadri's history of the criminal trial in the Western legal tradition presents representative cases, many famous, some little known, to illustrate the approaches, both rational and not, that organized societies have used to deal with law-breaking. One theme is the role of evidence in criminal prosecutions. Medieval trial by ordeal, for example, relied on the direct intervention of God to reveal guilt or innocence. In later epochs, confessions were accorded decisive weight, even if they were extracted by torture, as in the Inquisition and Stalin's show trials. Today, of course, we apply an intricate code of evidence, but, the author says, we still have verdicts based on ignorance and hysteria, and we have celebrity trials where evidence is subordinated to publicity. Much more serious is Kadri's summary of war...


The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law
Norm Goldstein (Editor)
0465004881
June 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
The world is divided into two types of people: those who wince when they see the words Canadian geese in print, and those who don't. If you are the former, or if you are the latter working for the former, the The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual provides invaluable assistance when you need to get your Canada geese all in a row. Countless newspapers and other publications base their style guides on this manual. The entries are arranged alphabetically and include issues of spelling, punctuation (there is no period in Dr Pepper), grammar, abbreviation, capitalization (Popsicle and Dumpster are, tollhouse cookies aren't), hyphenation (none, surprisingly, in ball point pen), and frequently misused words. There are also longer discussions of things such as Arabic...


America's Constitution : A Biography
Akhil Reed Amar
1400062624
September 13, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. You can read the U.S. Constitution, including its 27 amendments, in about a half-hour, but it takes decades of study to understand how this blueprint for our nation's government came into existence. Amar, a 20-year veteran of the Yale Law School faculty, has that understanding, steeped in the political history of the 1780s, when dissatisfaction with the Articles of Confederation led to a constitutional convention in Philadelphia, which produced a document of wonderful compression and balance creating an indissoluble union.Amar examines in turn each article of the Constitution, explaining how the framers drew on English models, existing state constitutions and other sources in structuring the three branches of the federal government and defining the relationship of the that government to the...


Contempt of Court
Mark Curriden
0385720823
Feb 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
Prior to 1906, the U.S. Supreme Court had never tried a criminal case--and the high court had yet to assert its power over state criminal courts. That was all to change after the events of a cold January night earlier that year in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Blond, beautiful, 21-year-old Nevada Taylor had hopped on one of Chattanooga's new electric trolleys after work. Before she could reach home, the young woman was waylaid and raped by an unknown assailant. At first Taylor couldn't describe her attacker to town sheriff Joseph Shipp, as she hadn't seen the man clearly, but she soon became convinced he was "a Negro with a soft, kind voice." In just 17 days, a drifter dubbed a "Negro fiend" by the Chattanooga News had been hastily arrested, tried, convicted, and sentenced to hang.

Two idealistic black lawyers intervened,...



One Nation Under God: The History of Prayer in America
James P. Moore
0385504039
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The simple contention of this fascinating study is that prayer has always been intertwined with America's cultural life. Moore, who teaches at McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, casts a broad net, beginning with Native American prayers before European colonization and culminating with the prayers of Americans after 9/11. He attends not only to prayers said around tables and in houses of worship but also to the way that the arts contribute to prayer: in the 19th century, artists like Thomas Cole penned prayers in art journals, and 20th-century Jewish composer Leonard Bernstein wrote a symphony that meditated on the Jewish kaddish. Indeed, Moore has really written a history of religion in America told through the lens of prayer; for example, his discussion of Shaker prayer is embedded in a...


The Supreme Court
William H. Rehnquist
0375708618
Feb 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist sets a simple goal for himself: "This book is designed to convey to the interested, informed layman, as well as lawyers who do not specialize in constitutional law, a better understanding of the role of the Supreme Court in American government." He succeeds fabulously. The Supreme Court, an updated version of a book originally published in 1987, is a succinct and readable account of the Court's past and present. Rehnquist avoids getting bogged down in the minutia of particular cases, even as he deftly covers the details of several extremely important ones, such as Marbury v. Madison and Dred Scott v. Sandford.

The most interesting parts of the book explain how the current Court goes about its business. In these fascinating chapters, Rehnquist consistently includes...



The Heritage Guide to the Constitution
Edwin Meese, et al
159698001X
November 7, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
This guide is the first of its kind, and presents the U.S. Constitution as never before, including a clause-by-clause analysis of the document, each amendment and relevant court case, and the documents that serve as the foundation of the Constitution.

From the Inside Flap
"The Constitution," pledged George Washington, "is the guide which I will never abandon." Can we say the same today? With the leadership of former Attorney General Edwin Meese, and in conjunction with the nation’s preeminent think tank—The Heritage Foundation—The Heritage Guide to the Constitution brings together more than one hundred of the nation’s best legal experts to provide the first ever line-by-line examination of the of the complete Constitution and its contemporary meaning. ...


The Majesty of the Law
Sandra Day O'Connor
081296747X
Apr 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
O'Connor, veteran associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, distills in this book the scores of talks she has given across the country and around the world in the 20 years since her accession to the high court. O'Connor, the author of the bestselling memoir Lazy B, is an enthusiast of the American legal system, reaching back to its origins in the Magna Carta and, later, in the English Privy Council, with its power to invalidate legislation. Declaring federal and state laws unconstitutional, of course, is the core of the Supreme Court's authority over this country's legal system, and O'Connor traces the exercise of that authority from the era of Chief Justice John Marshall to Brown v. Board of Education. In other chapters, O'Connor profiles Supreme Court titans such as Holmes and Taft, and reviews the long...


The Brethren : Inside the Supreme Court
Bob Woodward, Scott Armstrong
0743274024
July 1, 2005
Paperback
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Review
"Explosive...The most controversial book on the Supreme Court yet written."-- Los Angeles Times Book Review
"Fascinating. The pace is swift, with details that rivet the attention."-- The Washington Post Book World
"A provocative book about a hallowed institution...It is the most comprehensive inside story ever written of the most important court in the world. For this reason alone it is required reading."-- BusinessWeek
"It is to the credit of Woodward and Armstrong that they were willing -- and able -- to shatter this conspiracy of silence. It is certainly in the highest tradition of investigative journalism."-- Saturday Review
"One hell of a reporting achievement."-- The Village Voice

Book Description
The Brethren is the first detailed behind-the-scenes...


Living History
Hillary Rodham Clinton
0743222253
April 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
As with most books written by politicians while in office (or at least aiming for one), Living History is, first and foremost, safe. There are interesting observations and anecdotes, the writing is engaging, and there is enough inside scoop to appeal to those looking for a bit of gossip, but there are no bombshells here and it is doubtful the book will change many minds about this polarizing figure. This does not mean the work is without merit, however, for Hillary Clinton has much to say about her experience as first lady, which is the primary focus of the book. Those interested in these experiences and her commentary on them will find the book worth reading; those looking for revelations will be disappointed.

Beginning with a brief outline of her childhood, college years, introduction to politics, and her...



Organized Crime
Howard Abadinsky
0534551580
July 24, 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
Abadinsky provides a detailed analysis of the origins, history, theoretical explanations, and structure of organized crime, including drug trafficking, gambling, and loan sharking. The author also explains the methods employed by law enforcement agencies to combat organized crime, and the policy decisions reached by various investigating committees and commissions, including the President's Commission on Organized Crime. This text is known for presenting a comprehensive history of the subject and for being written in an engaging, "storytelling" style. In addition to presenting information on traditional organized crime groups in the United States, particularly New York and Chicago, Abadinsky covers organized crime groups on the international stage, including Chinese, Columbian, Italian, Jamaican, Japanese, Mexican,...


A People's History of the Supreme Court
Peter H. Irons
0140292012
Jan 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
The savvy, chatty author of The Courage of Their Convictions brings us a scholarly reckoning of the 200-plus years of decisions made by the highest court in the land. Not surprisingly (and justifiably, given his erudite arguments), Peter H. Irons represents the court's work as a never-ending appeal of the powerless to the powerful: of the just over 100 supreme justices who have sat on the court, all but two have been white, all but two have been men, and all but seven have been Christian, whereas the supplicants to our nation's highest bar are typically racial minorities, women, and deviants in some way from the religious and social mainstream.

Taking a representative (if not comprehensive) accounting of the Supreme Court's most significant decisions, Irons puts cultural and political context--and a human face--to the...



Black's Law Dictionary: Pocket Edition
Bryan Garner
0314257918
June 2001
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
This newest addition to the Black's Law Dictionary Series is an easy-to-access and completely up-to-date version of the world's most trusted and authoritative legal dictionary. It is based entirely on the widely-acclaimed 7th edition of Black's Law Dictionary, and has been edited by Bryan A. Garner, the nation's preeminent legal lexicographer. This Second Pocket Edition packs more than 10,000 terms into a single compact volume that is easy to read and even easier to carry. It is the essential companion dictionary to the Standard edition, or as a stand-alone legal tool. Definitions are accurate, brief, and clear. Black's is more than a dictionary--it is a reference that defines, explains and amplifies legal meaning. Helpful extras in the second edition include a dictionary guide and the complete U.S. Constitution. ...


Sorcerers' Apprentices: 100 Years of Law Clerks at the United States Supreme Court
Artemus Ward, David L. Weiden
0814794041
April 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
"Based on judicial working papers and extensive interviews, the authors have compiled the most complete picture to date of the transformation of Supreme Court law clerks from stenographers to ghost-writers. This will instantly become an essential resource for students of the Court." —Dennis J. Hutchinson, editor of The Supreme Court Review "A truly excellent study on an interesting and important question. As we know from the popularity of The Brethren and Closed Chambers, people love insider accounts of Supreme Court decision making, and this book provides that from a very unique point of view." —Howard Gillman, author of The Votes That Counted: How the Court Decided the 2000 Presidential Election Law clerks have been a permanent fixture in the halls of the United States Supreme Court from its...


A Murder in Virginia
Suzanne Lebsock
0393326063
Sept 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In recounting a 1895 murder investigation and trial in Lunenberg County, Va., Lebsock (The Free Women of Petersburg) meticulously brings to life a lost episode of a small, segregated Southern town and frames it against the backdrop of racial strife in the country as a whole. When the wife of a prominent Lunenberg man is murdered with an ax, a black farmhand, Solomon Marable, is immediately arrested. He shocks everyone by accusing three black women of the crime, and a dramatic set of trials ensues. Lebsock recounts the improbable roles of lawyers, judges, politicians, the black community and the defendants themselves in the case, thanking "the archivists, librarians, county clerks, the clerks' clerks, and packrats of all descriptions," who allowed her to recreate the investigations and five trials in astonishing...


Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq
Stephen Kinzer
0805078614
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The recent ouster of Saddam Hussein may have turned "regime change" into a contemporary buzzword, but it's been a tactic of American foreign policy for more than 110 years. Beginning with the ouster of Hawaii's monarchy in 1893, Kinzer runs through the foreign governments the U.S. has had a hand in toppling, some of which he has written about at length before (in All the Shah's Men, etc.). Recent invasions of countries such as Grenada and Panama may be more familiar to readers than earlier interventions in Iran and Nicaragua, but Kinzer, a foreign correspondent for the New York Times, brings a rich narrative immediacy to all of his stories. Although some of his assertions overreach themselves—as when he proposes that better conduct by the American government in the Spanish-American War might have prevented...


John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court
R. Kent Newmyer
0807127019
Jan 2001
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In this comprehensive scholarly study of the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1801 to 1835, Newmyer (Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story) succeeds at "locat[ing] Marshall and his jurisprudence in the broader historical context." Newmyer, a professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law, cites three principal sources for Marshall's constitutional thinking: his experience as a Revolutionary soldier, his law career steeped in the common law tradition, and his upbringing among the landowning elite in Virginia. These formative influences, Newmyer contends, created in the fourth chief justice a belief system centered on the primacy of the federal union and respect for property rights. As a judge, Marshall (1755-1835) believed in but did not always practice nonpolitical interpretation of the...


Class Action: The Story of Lois Jenson and the Landmark Case That Changed Sexual Harassment Law
Clara Bingham, Laura Leedy Gansler
0385496133
October 14, 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In 1997, in reversing a lower court decision, federal appellate Judge Donald Lay wrote in a sexual-harassment class-action lawsuit, Jenson v. Eveleth, "The emotional harm, brought about by this record of human indecency, sought to destroy the human psyche as well as the human spirit.... The humiliation and degradation suffered by these women is irreparable." Journalist Bingham's (Women on the Hill: Challenging the Culture of Congress) and attorney Gansler's deeply felt and disturbing narrative is the story of what informed Judge Lay's decision. In 1975, Lois Jenson became one of the first women to work in the iron mines of Minnesota and the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit. Eveleth Mines was Jenson's employer. The center of the story is the 25-year ordeal Jenson and other women miners underwent: the harshness and...


Stolen Lives: Twenty Years in a Desert Jail
Malika Oufkir
1413226124

Hardcover
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Book Description
Malika Oufkir has spent virtually her whole life as a prisoner. Born in 1953, the eldest daughter of General Oufkir, the King of Morocco's closest aide, Malika was adopted by the King at the age of five, and was brought up as the companion to his little daughter. Spending most of her childhood and adolescence in the seclusion of the court harem, Malika was one of the most eligible heiresses in the kingdom, surrounded by luxury and extraordinary privilege. Then on August 16th, 1972, her father was arrested and executed after an attempt to assassinate the King. Malika, her five siblings, and her mother were immediately imprisoned in a penal colony. After fifteen years, the last ten of which they spent locked up in solitary cells, the Oufkir children managed to dig a tunnel with their bare hands and make a daring...


Liberty, Property, and the Law (Five Volume Set)
Richard A. Epstein (Editor)
0815335431
May 2000
Library Binding
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Book Description
The wide collection of disciplines and periods represented in this five-volume set make it an ideal companion for courses in intellectual and legal history, political history, economic history, and common and constitutional law. The essays involved offer insightful understanding into the evolution of liberty and property in ways that are accessible to students without a strong technical background in economics, philosophy, or law. They contain probing evaluations of the central problems of legal and political thought that should prove of value to advanced students and specialists in these fields. Volumes also available individually.
Volume 1. Classical Foundations of Liberty and Property (0-8153-3555-5)
Volume 2. Modern Understanding of Liberty and Property (0-8153-3556-3)
Volume 3. Private and Common...


No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II
Doris Kearns Goodwin
0684804484
October 1995
Paperback
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Amazon.com
A compelling chronicle of a nation and its leaders during the period when modern America was created. With an uncanny feel for detail and a novelist's grasp of drama and depth, Doris Kearns Goodwin brilliantly narrates the interrelationship between the inner workings of the Roosevelt White House and the destiny of the United States. Goodwin paints a comprehensive, intimate portrait that fills in a historical gap in the story of our nation under the Roosevelts.

From Publishers Weekly
Goodwin's account of the Roosevelt presidency during WWII highlights America's changing domestic front. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

See all Editorial Reviews


In the Interest of Justice
Joel J. Seidemann
0060509678
Oct 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Despite what the subtitle says, most of the high-profile cases that draw Seidemann's focus are from the last quarter-century (a much shorter span than that covered in another volume of closing arguments, And the Walls Came Tumbling Down by Michael Lief and Mitchell Caldwell. The usual suspects (so to speak) are here: Johnnie Cochran's summation in O.J. Simpson's criminal trial, the prosecutors' opening statements in the cases of Adolf Eichmann and Timothy McVeigh. Seidemann, an assistant DA in New York City for over two decades, also offers three cases in which defendants represented themselves, including accused al-Qaeda conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui, though these and other cases (Martha Stewart, Marv Albert) seem included more for their notoriety than for the quality of the prose or legal arguments. But then...


Black's Law Dictionary
Bryan A. Garner
0314151990
June 2004
Textbook Hardcover
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Book Description
Edited by Bryan A. Garner, the world’s leading legal lexicographer, Black’s Law Dictionary, 8th Edition is now better than ever! The new 8th Edition has more than 43,000 definitions, plus almost 3,000 quotations. Alternative spellings or equivalent terms and expressions are provided for more than 5,300 terms and senses, serving a thesaurus-like function. The extensive appendix on legal abbreviations is a major addition. It’s the first time such a comprehensive guide has been included in a modern law dictionary, and is an invaluable aid to the legal researcher.
-17,000 more definitions than the 7th Edition
-Newly enhanced with West Key Numbers for research reference
-Includes changes made since the creation of the department of Homeland Security
-Almost 3,000 quotations from...


The Last Duel
Eric Jager
0767914171
Sept 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In 1386, Jean de Carrouges accused his former friend, Jacques LeGris, of raping his wife, and the young king of France allowed their dispute to be resolved in what was to be the last legally ordered judicial combat in Paris. Jager deftly blends this story with the background necessary to understand it: the ideas behind trial by combat, the realities of 14th-century marriage, the complexity of the regional and central powers in France, and the personal rivalries at court. Jager describes a harsh and violent era, when public executions were a form of entertainment and both commoners and elites eagerly anticipated the increasingly rare duel to the death. But it was also a time of lawyers, chroniclers and ceremony. Jager doesn't condescend to the people of medieval France but explains the complicated logic by which...


Mobsters, Unions, And Feds: The Mafia And the American Labor Movement
James B. Jacobs
0814742734
January 24, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
NYU law professor Jacobs further burnishes his reputation for advancing the study of organized crime in America with his latest work of scholarship, billed by the publisher as "the only book to investigate how the mob has distorted American labor history." This worthy successor to Gotham Unbound and Busting the Mob is an exhaustive, albeit sometimes repetitive, survey of the grip La Cosa Nostra has exerted on the country's most powerful unions. While many will be familiar with the broad outlines of the corruption that riddled the Teamsters, which is recounted by the author, his summary of some lesser-known examples of pervasive labor corruption help illustrate his thesis that the entire American union movement has suffered from the intimidation and fear the mob used to gain and maintain control of unions....


The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States (Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States)
Kermit L. Hall
0195176618
May 19, 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 10 Up-- An extremely thorough treatment of the subject, composed of brief defining entries and lengthy essays by almost 300 contributors, including lawyers, judges, scholars, and journalists, who were charged with the responsibility of making their presentations accessible to a general readership. Entries, arranged alphabetically, cover the internal operations and history of the Court; biographical information on all of the justices plus other relevant historical figures; definitions of basic legal and constitutional terminology; and the process of selecting, nominating, and confirming justices. More than 400 entries examine the Court's most significant decisions. All are signed; those of any length are followed by selective bibliographies of further reading. Every effort has been made to provide...


The Buffalo Creek Disaster
Gerald M. Stern
0394723430
Feb 1977
Paperback
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The Six Wives of Henry VIII
Alison Weir
0802136834
March 2000
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
YA-- A wonderfully detailed, extensively researched collective biography. Although the book is undoubtedly the work of a Tudor scholar, with sources ranging from previous biographies of these women to private papers, letters, diaries, and diplomatic sources, it is also the work of a competent fiction writer. The narrative is free flowing, humorous, informative, and readable. Weir's research abilities and deductive reasoning have shed a whole new light on the political maneuverings of the era and thus on the myriad forces that drove Henry VIII, his wives, and his children. Personal and obscure facts about the women, Henry's relationship with his nobles, and quirks of the times enliven the text. Genealogical tables for all the families involved are included. This book can be used for research, as it contains a...

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