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The Italian Crusades : The Papal-Angevin Alliance and the Crusades Against Christian Lay Powers, 1254-1343

0198219253


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Book Description
barcode need on back cover


The Lost Painting
Jonathan Harr
0375508015
Oct 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Given the relative obscurity of 16th-century the Italian baroque master and all-around creative bad boy Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, who after a flare of fame remained relatively unknown from his death until the 1950s, the 1992 discovery of the artist's missing painting The Taking of Christ understandably stirred up a frenzy in academic circles. Harr's skillful and long-awaited follow-up to 1997's A Civil Action provides a finely detailed account of the fuss. While contoured brush strokes and pentimenti repaints have little to do with the toxic waters and legalese Harr dissected in his debut, the author writes comfortably about complex artistic processes and enlivens the potentially tedious details of artistic restoration with his lively and articulate prose. Broken into short, succinct chapters, the narrative unfolds at a...


Daily Life in Medieval Times
Frances Gies
0760759138
September 2004
Hardcover
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The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople

0670033502


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From Publishers Weekly
While the first three Crusades were launched in an effort to reclaim Jerusalem from Muslims, the Fourth Crusade, begun in 1202, pitted Christians against Christians: Roman Catholics against Orthodox. In this authoritative and vivid account, historian and BBC commentator Phillips (Defenders of the Holy Land) uses monastic chronicles, letters and even the songs of court troubadours to reconstruct the brutal sacking of the Byzantine capital and its underlying causes. Although the enmity between East and West went back 150 years before the Crusade, the crusaders might never have sailed to Constantinople if Emperor Alexius III hadn't requested Pope Innocent to send troops to help him secure Eastern Christendom. When the French and Venetian soldiers arrived, however, they found themselves unwelcome and forced to camp...


History
Anatoly T. Fomenko
2913621066
June 2005
Paperback
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New Review Magazine, June 1, 2005
..Antiquity proves be a complete Renaissance hoax…Timeline shredded & compressed to barely 1000 years…True revolution in chronology of humankind..

New Review Magazine, July 1, 2005
Antiquity proves to be a complete Renaissance hoax…Timeline shredded & compressed to barely 1000 years…True revolution in chronology of humankind..

See all Editorial Reviews


The Fourth Crusade: The Conquest of Constantinople (Middle Ages)

0812217136


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The New Concise History of the Crusades
Thomas F. Madden
0742538222
May 2005
(Hardcover) - Revised Ed.
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Book Description
How have the crusades contributed to Islamist rage and terrorism today? Were the crusades the Christian equivalent of modern jihad? In this sweeping yet crisp history, Thomas F. Madden offers a brilliant and compelling narrative of the crusades and their contemporary relevance. Placing all the major crusades within their medieval social, economic, religious, and intellectual environments, Madden explores the uniquely medieval world that led untold thousands to leave their homes, family, and friends to march in Christ's name to distant lands. From Palestine and Europe's farthest reaches, each crusade is recounted in clear, concise narrative. The author gives special attention as well to the crusades' effects on the Islamic world and the Christian Byzantine East.

About the Author
...


Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades
Piers Paul Paul Read
0306810719
January 2001
Textbook Paperback
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Book Review
The Knights Templar remain the most glamorous, but also the most mysterious, of all religious organizations. Romanticized by Walter Scott in his novel Ivanhoe and by Wagner in his opera Parsifal, the Templars have been both celebrated as ascetic martyrs, dying for the greater good of Christianity, and condemned as deviant heretics, thieves, and sodomites who sold the Holy Land out to the Muslim Infidels. In his carefully researched study The Templars, the acclaimed novelist Piers Paul Read investigates the truth behind the myth. Placing his account of the rise of the Templars within a wider historical and political context, Read argues that "The Templars were a multinational force engaged in the defence of the Christian concept of a world order: and their demise marks the point when the pursuit of the common good within...


Concise History of the Crusades
Thomas F. Madden
0847694291
January 2000
Hardcover
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Book Description
The crusades were a quintessentially medieval phenomenon, which both defined and reflected the unique social forces that characterized Europe in the Middle Ages. In this fascinating book, Thomas F. Madden places the crusades within the medieval social, economic, religious, and intellectual environments that gave birth to the movement and nurtured it for centuries. He also examines the impact of the Crusades on the Islamic societies which were their primary target, as well as discussing their implications for the Christian Byzantine East. This book will provide students with an up-to-date and accessible introduction to both the Crusades and medieval history. Visit our website for sample chapters!

About the Author
Thomas F. Madden is an associate professor of history at Saint...


Knights and Castles
Will Osborne
0375802975
Aug 2000
Paperback
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Book Description
What was it like to wear armor? What was the food like in castles? This book explores what life was really like in medieval times.

Card catalog description
Jack and Annie look at knights, armor, and life in a castle. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Medieval Calligraphy: Its History and Technique
Marc Drogin
0486261425
November 1989
Paperback
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Book Description
Spirited history, comprehensive instruction manual covers 13 important writing styles (ca. 4th century thru 15th). Fascinating facts about Roman Rustic, Uncial, Carolingian Minuscule, Early Gothic, 8 other styles; all examples beautifully photographed. Detailed directions for duplicating medieval techniques with modern tools. 232 illus.


Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World
Jack Weatherford
0609809644
Mar 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Apart from its inapt title, Genghis Khan dies rather early on in this account and many of the battles are led by his numerous offspring. This book is a successful account of the century of turmoil brought to the world by a then little-known nation of itinerant hunters. In researching this book, Weatherford (Savages and Civilization), a professor of anthropology at Macalaster College, traveled thousands of miles, many on horseback, tracing Genghis Khan's steps into places unseen by Westerners since the khan's death and employing what he calls an "archeology of movement." Weatherford knows the story of the medieval Mongol conquests is gripping enough not to need superfluous embellishmentsâ€"the personalities and the wars they waged provide plenty of color and suspense. In just 25 years, in a manner that...


The Middle Ages
Susan Wise Bauer
0971412944
July 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
This comprehensive activity book and curriculum guide contains all you need to make history come alive for your child! Don't just read about history—experience it! Colro a picture of a Viking warrior, make an edible oasis, create a Moorish ruler's turban and Aztec jewelry and more. Designed to turn the accompanying book The Story of the World: Volume 2: The Middle Ages into a complete history program, this Activity Book provides you with comprehension questions and answers, sample narrations, maps and geography activities, coloring pages, lists of additional readings in history and literature, and plenty of simple, hands-on activities&151;all designed for grades 1-4.

About the Author
Susan Wise Bauer is a novelist and educator. With her mother, Hessie Wise, she...


A World Lit Only by Fire: The Medieval Mind & the Renaissance - Portrait of an Age
William Manchester
0316545562
June 1993
Paperback
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Book Review
It speaks to the failure of medieval Europe, writes popular historian William Manchester, that "in the year 1500, after a thousand years of neglect, the roads built by the Romans were still the best on the continent." European powers were so absorbed in destroying each other and in suppressing peasant revolts and religious reform that they never quite got around to realizing the possibilities of contemporary innovations in public health, civil engineering, and other peaceful pursuits. Instead, they waged war in faraway lands, created and lost fortunes, and squandered millions of lives. For all the wastefulness of medieval societies, however, Manchester notes, the era created the foundation for the extraordinary creative explosion of the Renaissance. Drawing on a cast of characters numbering in the hundreds,...


The Fall of the Roman Empire : A New History of Rome and the Barbarians
Peter Heather
0195159543
December 1, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
The death of the Roman Empire is one of the perennial mysteries of world history. Now, in this groundbreaking book, Peter Heather proposes a stunning new solution: Rome generated its own nemesis. Centuries of imperialism turned the neighbors it called barbarians into an enemy capable of
dismantling the Empire that had dominated their lives for so long.
Heather is a leading authority on the late Roman Empire and on the barbarians. In The Fall of the Roman Empire, he explores the extraordinary success story that was the Roman Empire and uses a new understanding of its continued strength and enduring limitations to show how Europe's barbarians,
transformed by centuries of contact with Rome on every possible level, eventually pulled it apart. He shows first how the Huns overturned the existing strategic...


The Knights Templar : The History and Myths of the Legendary Order
Sean Martin
1560256451
January 9, 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
This book is an essential exploration into the history of a legendary group of Crusaders, which are prominently featured in Dan Brown's recent best seller, The Da Vinci Code. The Knights Templar rose from humble beginnings to become the most powerful military religious order of the Middle Ages. Formed to protect pilgrims in the Holy Land, they participated in the Crusades and rapidly gained wealth, lands, and influence. Seemingly untouchable for nearly two centuries, they fell from grace spectacularly after the loss of the Holy Land. In the ensuing centuries the Templars have exerted a unique influence over European history; orthodox historians see them as nothing more than soldier-monks whose arrogance was their ultimate undoing, while others see them as occultists of the first order. With clarity and ease, Martin...


The Knights Templar
Stephen Howarth
0880296631
June 1991
Hardcover
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Holy War
Karen Armstrong
0385721404
Nov 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Judaism, Christianity and Islam--obviously central to Middle East crises today--were also at the crux of the Crusades nearly 1000 years ago. Maps. Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Library Journal
Recent historians have convincingly demonstrated that 13th-century European governments institutionalized three forms of irrational bigotry that have tragically affected the modern world: anti-Semitism, anti-homosexuality, and anti-Islam. This important book, which brings the perspective of a student of theology and literature who also knows traditional political history, sees the medieval Crusades as the root of current Middle East conflicts. Such a view substantiates the historical interpretation. The...


1453
Roger Crowley
1401301916
Aug 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
On May 29, 1453, Ottoman forces, under the leadership of Mehmet II, concluded their long and bloody siege of Constantinople by storming the city and overtaking it. According to Crowley, who works in publishing in England;the Ottoman conquest of the city brought to an end centuries of conflict between the Byzantine Empire and Islam. In overwhelming detail and colorless prose, Crowley chronicles the story of an ancient city and its attraction to members of two major religions. Before Mehmet's conquest, Constantinople had faced various unsuccessful sieges, and Crowley faithfully records them. The most destructive events came between 1341 and 1371, when earthquakes and the Black Death devastated the city, turning it into a forlorn series of villages. Although the Byzantine capital recovered enough of its former glory...


The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain
Maria Rosa Menocal
0316168718
April 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
María Rosa Menocal's wafting, ineffably sad The Ornament of the World tells of a time and place--from 786 to 1492, in Andalucía, Spain--that is largely and unjustly overshadowed in most historical chronicles. It was a time when three cultures--Judaic, Islamic, and Christian--forged a relatively stable (though occasionally contentious) coexistence. Such was this period that there remains in Toledo a church with an "homage to Arabic writing on its walls [and] a sumptuous 14th-century synagogue built to look like Granada's Alhambra." Long gone, however, is the Córdoba library--a thousand times larger than any other in Christian Europe. Menocal's history is one of palatine cities, of philosophers, of poets whose work inspired Chaucer and Boccaccio, of weeping fountains, breezy courtyards, and a long-running...


How the Irish Saved Civilization (Hinges of History)
Thomas Cahill
0385418493
February 1, 1996
Paperback
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Book Review
In this delightful and illuminating look into a crucial but little-known "hinge" of history, Thomas Cahill takes us to the "island of saints and scholars," the Ireland of St. Patrick and the Book of Kells. Here, far from the barbarian despoliation of the continent, monks and scribes laboriously, lovingly, even playfully preserved the West's written treasury. When stability returned in Europe, these Irish scholars were instrumental in spreading learning, becoming not only the conservators of civilization, but also the shapers of the medieval mind, putting their unique stamp on Western culture.

From Publishers Weekly
An account of the pivotal role played by Irish monks in transcribing and preserving Classical civilization during the Dark Ages. Copyright 1996 Reed Business...


The Year 1000
Robert Lacey
0316511579
Apr 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
"August was the month when flies started to become a problem, buzzing round the dung heaps in the corner of every farmyard and hovering over the open cesspits of human refuse that were located outside every house."

Although daily dangers were many, housing uncomfortable, and the dominant smells unpleasant indeed, life in England at the turn of the previous millennium was not at all bad, write journalists Lacey and Danziger. "If you were to meet an Englishman in the year 1000," they continue, "the first thing that would strike you would be how tall he was--very much the size of anyone alive today." The Anglo-Saxons were not only tall, but also generally well fed and healthy, more so than many Britons only a few generations ago. Writing in a breezy, often humorous style, Lacey and Danziger draw on the medieval...



History: Fiction or Science
Anatoly T. Fomenko
2913621058
March 2004
Paperback
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Midwest Book Review (Oregon, WI USA),July 17, 2004July 17, 2004
may appear controversial yet deals with a very serious issue directly affecting humanity's comprehension of its own past.

Midwest Book Review (Oregon, WI USA),July 17, 2004
..deals with a very serious issue directly affecting humanity's comprehension of its own past..

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Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England
Alison Weir
0345453190
October 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Isabella of France (1295?–1358) married the bisexual Edward II of England as a 12-year-old, lived with him for 17 years, bore him four children, fled to France in fear of his powerful favorite, returned with her lover, Roger Mortimer, to lead a rebellion and place her son on the throne and eventually saw Mortimer executed as her son asserted his power. Veteran biographer Weir (Eleanor of Aquitaine, etc.) battles Isabella's near-contemporaries and later storytellers and historians for control of the narrative, successfully rescuing the queen from writers all too willing to imagine the worst of a medieval woman who dared pursue power. Weir makes great use of inventories to recreate Isabella's activities and surroundings and, strikingly, to establish the timing of the queen's turn against her...


Arab Historians of the Crusades
Francesco Gabrieli
0880294523
December 1989
Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English, Italian, Arabic (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Warriors of God
James Reston, Jr.
0385495625
May 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
Throughout the medieval era, the Holy Land was a fiercely contested battlefield, fought over by huge Muslim and Christian armies, by zealots and assassins. The Third Crusade, spanning five years at the end of the 12th century, was, writes James Reston Jr. in this absorbing account, "Holy War at its most virulent," overseen by two great leaders, the Kurdish sultan Salah ad-Din, or Saladin, and the English king Richard, forevermore known as Lionheart.

Writing with a keen sense of historical detail and drama, Reston traces the complex path by which Saladin and Richard came to face each other on the field of battle. The Crusades, he observes, began "as a measure to redirect the energies of warring European barons from their bloody, local disputes into a 'noble' quest to reclaim the Holy Land from the 'infidel'." Of the five...



The Fall of Rome : And the End of Civilization
Bryan Ward-Perkins
0192805649
September 1, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Was the fall of Rome a great catastrophe that cast the West into darkness for centuries to come? Or, as scholars argue today, was there no crisis at all, but simply a peaceful blending of barbarians into Roman culture, an essentially positive transformation?
In The Fall of Rome, eminent historian Bryan Ward-Perkins argues that the "peaceful" theory of Rome's "transformation" is badly in error. Indeed, he sees the fall of Rome as a time of horror and dislocation that destroyed a great civilization, throwing the inhabitants of the West back to a
standard of living typical of prehistoric times. Attacking contemporary theories with relish and making use of modern archaeological evidence, he looks at both the wider explanations for the disintegration of the Roman world and also the consequences for the lives of...


The Swordman's Companion: A Manual for Training With the Medieval Longsword
Guy Windsor
1891448412
May 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
THE SWORDSMANS' COMPANION is a superb introduction to a modern system of self-defense based on the Italian medieval masters Fiore dei Liberi and Filippo Vadi. Intended for the beginner, the book approaches the art of swordsmanship from the perspective of a martial art, building the student's confidence through many drills, exercises, and explanations. Guy Windsor, founder and director of The School For European Swordsmanship, Helsinki, brings his extensive experience to bear in creating was is surely the first modern treatise based on the medieval Italian treatises. The swordsmanship he offers is elegant and flashy, but it is also rooted in firm basics that include unarmoured wrestling techniques and throws.


The New Cambridge Medieval History, Vol. 1: c. 500-c. 700
Paul Fouracre (Editor), et al
0521362911
December 8, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
The first volume of The New Cambridge Medieval History covers the transitional period between the later Roman world and the early middle ages, c. 500 to c. 700. This was an era of developing consciousness and profound change in Europe, Byzantium and the Arab world, an era in which the foundations of medieval society were laid and to which many of our modern myths of national and religious identity can be traced. This book offers a comprehensive regional survey of the sixth and seventh centuries, from Ireland in the west to the rise of Islam in the Middle East, and from Scandinavia in the north to the Mediterranean south. It explores the key themes pinning together the history of this period, from kingship, trade and the church, to art, architecture and education. It represents both an invaluable conspectus of...


The Templar Papers: Ancient Mysteries, Secret Societies, And the Holy Grail
Karen Ralls (Foreword), et al
1564148637
March 30, 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
Much has been written about the group of 14th-century warrior monks known as the Knights Templar. Some authors, such as Dan Brown in The Da Vinci Code, portray them as folk heroes wrongly accused. Others disagree, saying the Templar story is ultimately one of greed, deception, and idolatry. Just who were the Knights Templar? And what is their legacy? In The Templar Papers, author and historian Oddvar Olsen has assembled a veritable Who's Who of experts to unravel the mystery. Instead of rehashing previous scholarship, this book delves into new aspects of Templar lore, such as the origins of the order and its supposed survival after 1314. It attempts to answer the following: • Were the Templars devil worshippers who venerated a mysterious head? • Was the head that of John the Baptist? • What...

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