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Behind Rebel Lines: The Incredible Story of Emma Edmonds, Civil War Spy
Seymour Reit
0152164278
August 1, 2001
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
Gr 5-8 According to the estimates of some historians, as many as 400 women fought in the Civil War disguised as men. One such woman was Emma Ed monds, 21 years old and Canadian born. She felt fiercely patriotic towards her adopted country, and was deter mined to fight for the Union. Not only did she serve as a field nurse, tending the wounded at the battle sites, but she also served as a Union spy. Reit has used Emma's own published memoirs (long out of print), research from the National Archives, and U. S. Army re cords. It should make for an exciting tale. Unfortunately, the finished prod uct doesn't measure up to its promise. The style is far too episodic, with little unity between adventures, and not enough fleshing out of events. Some fictionalizing of dialogue and thoughts occurs. This is most likely...


Illustrated History of Canada
Craig Brown (Editor)
1552635082
February 2003
Textbook Paperback
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From Booklist
Perhaps because of our growing Hispanic population, Americans have become increasingly aware of the history, politics, and culture of our neighbors to the south, particularly Mexico. But what about Canada? One suspects that even most well-educated Americans are woefully ignorant of the key personalities, events, and trends in Canadian history. Hopefully, this excellent anthology devoted to various aspects of Canadian history will help remedy that situation. Each of the six chapters is written by a different and distinguished historian or geographer. Among the topics covered, the examinations of Native American cultures and of Canada's relations with the U.S. are particularly interesting. The illustrations, both black and white and color, are superb complements to the text, and few of them are familiar to Americans. This...


The Day the World Came to Town : 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland
Jim DeFede
0060559713
September 1, 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
The events of September 11 have seemingly been covered, analyzed, and discussed from every angle imaginable. So the subject matter alone of Jim DeFede's The Day the World Came to Town makes it noteworthy. In the immediate aftermath of the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, 38 commercial airliners carrying over 6,000 passengers were forced, as a precautionary measure, to land in Gander, Newfoundland, Canada. Due to the ongoing closure of U.S. airspace, the passengers spent four days in this isolated town of 10,000 before being allowed to continue on their way. In that time, Gander's residents rallied together to extend a kind of hospitality that seems too expansive for the word hospitality. Townspeople not only opened schools and legion halls for use as emergency shelters, they invited the passengers into...


The Secret Treasure of Oak Island
D'Arcy O'Connor
1592282792
June 2004
Paperback
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Review
"Staggering."--Kirkus Reviews

"Exhaustive and intriguing."--Publishers Weekly

"A splendid reportorial job."--Business Week

"A highly readable volume . . . the story builds from the first page to the last."--Christian Science Monitor


Book Description
The fascinating history and present-day account of the oldest treasure hunt in North America.


See all Editorial Reviews


Canada
David F. Marx
0516270834
March 2000
Paperback
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From Booklist
Gr. 1-2. With large, full-color photographs and a simple bold-face text, this small, attractive book in the Rookie Read-About Geography series gives a good overview of the country, with a quick glance at its early history and at its places and people in all their diversity. In Quebec today, French is spoken just as much as English, though English is the language in most of Canada. Most people live in the big southern cities, but there are also contemporary pictures of Inuit in the icy Nunavut territory. The clear photos show miners underground, farmers on the land, people in stores and factories and on the snowy streets of Ottawa. A final double-page spread repeats nine of the photos in miniature with a few key words from the pages. --Hazel Rochman Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library...


A Field Guide to the Tiger Beetles of the United States and Canada
David L. Pearson
0195181565
Aug 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
This color illustrated field and natural history guide treats all 107 known tiger beetle species found in North America above the Mexican border. Tiger beetles are among the most widely found and popular families of insects worldwide. Enabling amateur naturalists and professionals to use two
identification methods--comparison of colored pictures to live or mounted specimens, and use of illustrated dichotomous keys--full biological accounts emphasize points for identification, behaviors, and habitats. Distribution maps show where various species and subspecies can be found. The authors
promote a new and exciting activity of insect watching as an alternative or supplement to collecting (the general feeling among "butterfliers" and dragonfly and damselfly enthusiasts). Communicating primarily through the...


Anne of Green Gables (Anne of Green Gables Series #1)
L. M. Montgomery
055321313X
September 1992
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Review
When Marilla Cuthbert's brother, Matthew, returns home to Green Gables with a chatty redheaded orphan girl, Marilla exclaims, "But we asked for a boy. We have no use for a girl." It's not long, though, before the Cuthberts can't imagine how they could ever do without young Anne of Green Gables--but not for the original reasons they sought an orphan. Somewhere between the time Anne "confesses" to losing Marilla's amethyst pin (which she never took) in hopes of being allowed to go to a picnic, and when Anne accidentally dyes her hated carrot-red hair green, Marilla says to Matthew, "One thing's for certain, no house that Anne's in will ever be dull." And no book that she's in will be, either. This adapted version of the classic, Anne of Green Gables, introduces younger readers to the irrepressible heroine of L.M....


Between Friends/Entre Amis [BOX SET]
Lorraine Monk (Editor), et al
0771067186
June 2001
Hardcover
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Book Description
Published in 1976, Between Friends/Entre Amis was Canada's gift to the United States on its bicentennial. McClelland & Stewart's press run was the most ambitious Canadian publishing project to that time, and the book received outstanding praise. It has been out of print for many years. A special Presentation Edition was run for American dignitaries. Pierre Trudeau and Lorraine Monk personally gave President Ford his copy in a Washington ceremony. Twenty five years later, there are 75 copies of this special edition, which was never available for sale in the U.S. or Canada. Each will be personally signed by Lorraine Monk, and is handsomely slipcased.

Language Notes
Text: English, French


Last Man Out
Melissa Fay Greene
015602957X
May 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
On October 23, 1958, gases from deep within the earth shot skyward, causing entire floors of rock to rise instantly in a coal mine in Springhill, Nova Scotia, trapping 174 men underground. Seventy-five miners never made it out alive. Miraculously, two small groups of miners survived the initial "bump" but were sealed in small caverns deep within the coal. Surrounded by foul air and total darkness, and with precious little food and water, the men vacillated between optimism and hopelessness as they tried to maintain sanity amidst horrific conditions. Above them, fellow miners and rescue workers dug desperately to get them out, clinging to the unwritten Miner's Code that no man shall be left behind. After a week of digging and with hope all but exhausted, they found one group of a dozen miners; a day later seven more men were...


Dawn on a Distant Shore
Sara Donati
0553578553
May 2001
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Review
Sara Donati's novel Dawn on a Distant Shore picks up soon after the conclusion of her prior book, Into the Wilderness. In the winter of 1794, on the edge of the New York wilderness, Elizabeth and Nathaniel Bonner have settled into the comforts of domestic bliss. Typically, however, adventure seeks these two out. Alone but for her stepdaughter Hannah, Elizabeth gives birth to twins, while Nathaniel and his father Hawkeye are imprisoned in Montreal. Determined to help her men, Elizabeth packs up the children and sets off to free them. Liberty does not bring relief to the Bonner clan, however, as sinister forces conspire to pirate them to Scotland and embroil them in a complex family feud.

History and adventure are slathered on thickly throughout this epic tale. Donati's talent for dialect and detail bring the large cast of...



The Kingmaker : How Northern Dancer Founded a Racing Dynasty
Avalyn Hunter
1581501374
April 25, 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
When Canadian industrialist and Thoroughbred breeder E.P. Taylor watched his well-bred, handsome colt pass unsold through the auction ring, he could hardly have envisioned the degree to which this seeming misfortune would boomerang in his favor. Named Northern Dancer, the sales reject proved his worth by winning the 1964 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes for Taylor. In doing so, he become a Canadian hero. And that was only the beginning. As a stallion, the diminutive Northern Dancer exerted a legendary influence on the breed, at one time commanding a million-dollar stud fee. International competition for his offspring created world records in the auction ring. Respected pedigree authority Avalyn Hunter explores how Northern Dancer and his sons have established a royal dynasty that has profoundly dominated the...


The Klondike Fever
Pierre Berton
0786713178
Dec 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
In 1897 a grimy steamer docked in Seattle and set into epic motion the incredible succession of events that Pierre Berton's exhilarating The Klondike Fever chronicles in all its splendid and astonishing folly. For the steamer Portland bore two tons of pure Klondike gold. And immediately, the stampede north to Alaska began. Easily as many as 100,000 adventurers, dreamers, and would-be miners from all over the world struck out for the remote, isolated gold fields in the Klondike Valley, most of them in total ignorance of the long, harsh Alaskan winters and the territory's indomitable terrain. Less than a third of that number would complete the enormously arduous mountain journey to their destination. Some would strike gold. Berton's story belongs less to the few who would make their fortunes than to the many swept up in...


The United States and Canada: The Land and the People
Arthur Getis, et al
0072356774
August 4, 2000
Hardcover
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Book Description
This full-color text explores the United States and Canada with a fresh, logical approach. The authors examine the regions of the United States and Canada using a thematic approach, via such topics as agriculture, industry, and population. This topical framework provides an insightful perspective for students to learn the similarities and differences that characterize the regions of these countries. Chapter 1, "Introduction," provides basic geographic background and places the United States and Canada in a global perspective. Then coverage of both countries is incorporated into each topical chapter, concluding with a separate chapter (14), "The Canadian Difference," which looks at Canadian-specific issues, such as the English/French language debate.


Anne of Avonlea (Anne of Green Gables Series #2)
L. M. Montgomery
0553213148
June 1984
Mass Market Paperback
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From Library Journal
This duo continue the adventures of Anne Shirley begun in Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables. Avonlea (1909) finds her at 16 taking on a job as a school teacher, while in Island (1915), a slightly older Anne moves on to college to continue her own education. Along with the full text, these editions also include scholarly essays. These budget hardcovers are for all fiction collections.Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From AudioFile
The famous red-haired orphan, ANNE OF GREEN GABLES is back, grown up and ready to start her first teaching job at the village school. Her best friend, her adopted mother, and her neighbor all share in her spirited adventures. Liza Ross sounds whiny as the...


How to Be a Canadian
Will Ferguson, Ian Ferguson
1550548913
October 10, 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
It isn’t always easy being Canadian, according to Will Ferguson, but it can be a lot of fun. Asked to write a follow-up to his runaway bestseller Why I Hate Canadians, Ferguson, who’s Canadian himself, recruited his brother Ian — comedy writer and executive producer of the Canadian series Sin City and a Canadian too — to create this ultimate guide to the country's cultural quirks. The result is a hilarious inside look at that unique species, the Canadian, and their thoughts on such diverse subjects as beer, sex, dating rituals, sports, politics, religion, social rules — and, of course, their trademark death-defying search for the middle of any road.


The Invasion of Canada
Pierre Berton
0385658397
Aug 2001
Paperback
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Review
"If history could be taught in the schools the way Berton writes about it, there wouldn't be a more popular subject on the curriculum."
The Globe and Mail

"A wonderful historical work…a book of love, ambition, guile, heroism, tragedy and cowardice."
The Detroit News

"…a popular history as it should be written."
The New York Times

Review
"If history could be taught in the schools the way Berton writes about it, there wouldn't be a more popular subject on the curriculum." ?The Globe and Mail

"A wonderful historical work?a book of love, ambition, guile, heroism, tragedy and cowardice." ?The Detroit News

"?a popular history as it should be written." ?The...


Curse of the Narrows
Laura M. Mac Donald
0802714587
October 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
Assiduous research, beautiful writing, and a great talent for historical reconstruction make Laura MacDonald's Curse of the Narrows the definitive account of the Halifax explosion of December 1917. MacDonald is a master of minutia--chemistry, laws of navigation, the horrors visited on the poor people of Halifax's north end--and she writes with supreme authority and exquisite detail.

MacDonald begins her account with geography and she sets the scene by examining the bustling port of Halifax in the First World War. Using the very best recent scholarship, she then reconstructs the accident itself, describing closely the series of small errors that lead the Norwegian freighter Imo to ram into the French munitions vessel Mont Blanc in the narrows of Halifax harbor: "The Mont Blanc, with 2,925 tons of explosives,...



Anne of the Island (Anne of Green Gables Series #3)
L. M. Montgomery
0553213172
November 1983
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
New adventures lie ahead as Anne Shirley packs  her bags, waves good-bye to childhood, and heads for  Redmond College. With old friend Prissy Grant  waiting in the bustling city of Kingsport and  frivolous new pal Philippa Gordon at her side, Anne tucks  her memories of rural Avonlea away and discovers  life on her own terms, filled with  surprises...including a marriage proposal from the worst fellow  imaginable, the sale of her very first story, and a  tragedy that teaches her a painful lesson. But  tears turn to laughter when Anne and her friends move  into an old cottage and an ornery black cat steals  her heart. Little does Anne know that handsome  Gilbert Blythe wants to win her heart,...


Rifleman Went to War
H. W. McBride
0935856013
September 1987
Hardcover
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The Group of Seven and Tom Thomson
David P. Silcox
155297605X
Sept 2003
Hardcover
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From Booklist
*Starred Review* The circle of gifted and zealous Canadian painters that dubbed itself the Group of Seven in Toronto in 1920 after working together a good dozen years would have been the Group of Eight if Tom Thomson, who, along with Lawren Harris, painted the most recognizable of the influential band's resplendent images, hadn't drowned in 1917. Art historian Silcox, a wonderfully lucid stylist, describes this pioneering group as "socially responsible, serious, fervent, egalitarian, and sensitive to the concerns of ordinary people," even though they failed to accept women artists as their equals, and expertly chronicles their mission to create an "all-Canadian art." Guided by the transcendentalists Emerson and Thoreau, they sought to capture the spirituality inherent in nature, and consequently painted astonishingly...


Red China Blues : My Long March From Mao to Now
Jan Wong
0385482329
May 19, 1997
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This superb memoir is like no other account of life in China under both Mao and Deng. Wong is a Canadian ethnic Chinese who, in 1972, at the height of the cultural revolution, was one of the first undergraduate foreigners permitted to study at Beijing University. Filled with youthful enthusiasms for Mao's revolution, she was an oddity: a Westerner who embraced Maoism, appeared to be Chinese and wished to be treated as one, although she didn't speak the language. She set herself to become fluent, refused special consideration, shared her fellow-students rations and housing, their required stints in industry and agriculture and earnestly tried to embrace the Little Red Book. Although Wong felt it her duty to turn in a fellow student who asked for help to emigrate to the West, she could not repress continual shock...


The Great Depression
Pierre Berton
0385658435
Oct 2001
Paperback
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Review
"The Great Depression is the definitive work that will carry our collective memory with us into the next century." —Calgary Herald

"Berton's chilling magnum opus… [He] has produced something very near perfect. It's clearly written, fast-moving…and so well drafted it reads like a novel." —The Times Colonist, Victoria

"a scalding indictment of the law, big business, the bigots, the police and politicians." —Canadian Press

Review
"The Great Depression is the definitive work that will carry our collective memory with us into the next century." ?Calgary Herald

"Berton's chilling magnum opus? [He] has produced something very near perfect. It's clearly written,...


The Perfect Storm: A True Story of Men Against the Sea
Sebastian Junger
0641646674

Paperback
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Rough Crossings: Britain, the Slaves and the American Revolution
Simon Schama
006053916X
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
[Signature]Reviewed by Adam HochschildHas there ever been a patch of history more celebrated than the American Revolution? The torrent is endless: volume after volume about the glory of 1776, the miracle of 1787 and enough biographies of the Founding Fathers to stretch from the Liberty Bell to Bunker Hill and back again. The Library of Congress catalogue lists 271 books or other items to do with George Washington's death and burial alone. Enough!By contrast with the usual hagiography, distinguished historian Schama has found a little-known story from this era that makes the Founding Fathers look not so glorious. The Revolution saw the first mass emancipation of slaves in the Americas—an emancipation, however, not done by the revolutionaries but by their enemies. Many American rebel leaders were slave...


Tip of the Iceberg
Larry O'Connor
082032356X
Apr 2002
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
In this melancholy memoir, O'Connor, an editor for the Wall Street Journal, mingles his childhood experiences growing up in a small town in central Canada with the myths and legends of the far north. Both are suffused with a strange silence. The extreme solitude of his childhood is imposed upon the family by his stern father who spends his time as a traveling salesman and, in the winter, his evenings alone in the backyard flooding a skating rink. Watching his father from the window, O'Connor "was waiting for a wink, a sidelong glance, a doff of the fedora, anything. But it didn't happen. He didn't once look up from the ice." The silence masks an extraordinary family secret that serves as a suspenseful backdrop to the quiet life of this boy and extends well into adulthood when he finally uncovers the secret....


The Ransom of Mercy Carter (Laurel Leaf Books)
Caroline B. Cooney
0440227755
November 12, 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Based on actual events, this latest offering from the accomplished Cooney (The Face on the Milk Carton; Driver's Ed) is a gripping and thought-provoking account of the 1704 Indian raid on the English settlement of Deerfield, Mass. After their village is burned and many of its residents killed, Mercy and more than 100 other settlers are taken prisoner by the Kahnawake Mohawk, who have been converted to Catholicism by the French. Some of the novel's most riveting chapters describe the difficult winter trek that takes them 300 miles north to Canada, where Mercy settles into life in a traditional Indian village near Montreal. Uncertain whether she will be adopted by the Mohawk who captured her or whether the English will pay the ransom that would allow her to return to Massachusetts, Mercy struggles to balance...


Wolfe & Montcalm
Joy Carroll
1552979059
July 2004
Paperback
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Andrew Armitage, Owen Sound Sun Times 08/19/2004
A compellingly readable account... fast-paced, entertaining and historically accurate.

John Wilson, Quill and Quire 08/2004
Popular history at its best -- accessible and informative...a splendid introduction to an important event... an engaging portrait.

See all Editorial Reviews


Apple's America: The Discriminating Traveler's Guide to 40 Great Cities in the United States and Canada
R. W. Apple
0865476853
March 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred hotel reviews, restaurant price ranges and detailed directions have no place in Apple's latest travel guide (after Apple's Europe). Instead, readers get an appealing array of historical trivia and museum mentions relating to American cities. As a former New York Times correspondent (he's now an associate editor), Apple traveled extensively throughout the U.S. and Canada. After "playing Baedeker" for many years, he parlayed his knowledge of America's cities into a series of articles for the Times, which he updates here. Written in a conversational tone with an emphasis more on city character and less on the best shopping districts, this opinionated, nontraditional work is refreshing. Among Apple's revelations: San Francisco is "full of itself"; Tampa is home to the "world's largest collection of paintings...


Trains Across the Continent: North American Railroad History
Rudolph Daniels
0253214114
December 2000
Paperback
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Book Description
"The best current railroad history available . . . everything you need to know . . . both educational and enjoyable reading." --Dean Bruce, President, Railroad Education Training Association "Trains Across the Continent truly is a comprehensive account of how railroads helped shpae and are continuing to shape the history of North America." --Jonathan B. Hanna, Historian, Canadian Pacific Railway "Quickly and concisely Dr. Daniels leads you through the maze of building, merging, and a myriad of other details necessary to understand modern railroading." --Donald D. Snoddy, Historian, Union Pacific Railroad

About the Author
Rudolph Daniels taught Russian studies at Loras College, Clarke College, and Dubuque University--all in Dubuque, Iowa--before moving to West Germany in 1974,...

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