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Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway
Jonathan B. Parshall, Anthony Tully
1574889230
December 15, 2005
Hardcover
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John B. Lundstrom, author of "The First Team: Pacific Naval Air Combat from Pearl Harbor to Midway"
"To really know about the Battle of Midway, you must read this book."

Robert J. Cressman, editor and principal author of "A Glorious Page in Our History: The Battle of Midway"
"Extensively researched, soundly reasoned, and engagingly and colorfully written..."

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Shadow Divers
Robert Kurson
0345482476
May 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Kurson's chronicle of an extraordinary deep-sea discovery makes for a captivating audio experience. In 1991, divers John Chatterton and Rich Kohler came across the buried remains of a German submarine just off the coast of New Jersey. Unable to identify the ship and mystified as to its origins, the two men became obsessed with learning where the U-boat came from and what brought it to the bottom of the sea. Although the story's set-up, which comprises most of the first disc, drags, the pace picks up when the partners begin traveling the world, digging up clues. Reader Scott uses character voices but keeps them subdued, even when dealing with the salty language of the seamen. This is a wise move, since there's plenty of drama inherent in the text; lengthy and detailed passages describing deep-water dives, and the...


The Navy
W.J. Holland
076076218X
September 2004
Hardcover
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Down Range : Navy SEALs in the War on Terrorism
Dick Couch
1400081009
July 19, 2005
Hardcover
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Review
Down Range puts the reader in the SEAL squad file, in the action. It is the unique and personal story of the warriors who go in harm’s way in the global war on terror.” —The Hon. Anthony Principi, Secretary of Veterans Affairs (2001–2005)

“An intimate account of the deadly work of the U.S. Navy SEALs. We associate the Navy’s special forces with maritime operations, but in the war against terrorists they have been almost everywhere—from the high mountains of Afghanistan blowing up Taliban ordnance to the streets of Mosul hunting down former Baathists and al-Qaedists. Down Range is a fascinating, behind-the-scenes account of how the SEALs fight and why they are so good at it—written by a seasoned veteran in gripping fashion.” —Victor Davis...


The Pirate Coast
Richard Zacks
1401300030
June 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The author of The Pirate Hunter,which made Captain Kidd come to life, focuses here more broadly on a piracy hot spot. Resolved to stop the enslavement of American merchant sailors by North African nations, Jefferson deployed most of the infant U.S. Navy to the Mediterranean and sent a column of troops overland from Egypt to place the pasha of Tripoli's brother Hamet on the throne in 1801. The leader of that motley array of mercenaries, Muslim tribesmen, Hamet's retainers and a handful of U.S. Marines was the colorful and combative William Eaton, who led them more than 500 miles across the desert to "the shores of Tripoli." By the time he arrived, peace negotiations were underway, in the hands of one Tobias Deane, who was neither honest nor competent. Eaton had to abandon Hamet and was in turn virtually abandoned...


U.S. Naval Aviation
National Museum of Naval Aviation
0641623097

Hardcover
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The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783 (Library of Essential Reading Series)
Alfred Thayer Mahan
0760754993
February 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Influential classic of naval history and tactics still used as text in war colleges. Read by Kaiser Wilhelm, both Roosevelts, other leaders. First paperback edition. 4 maps. 24 battle plans.


Blind Man's Bluff
Sherry Sontag
006103004X
Oct 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
Little is known--and less has been published--about American submarine espionage during the Cold War. These submerged sentinels silently monitored the Soviet Union's harbors, shadowed its subs, watched its missile tests, eavesdropped on its conversations, and even retrieved top-secret debris from the bottom of the sea. In an engaging mix of first-rate journalism and historical narrative, Sherry Sontag, Christopher Drew, and Annette Lawrence Drew describe what went on.

"Most of the stories in Blind Man's Bluff have never been told publicly," they write, "and none have ever been told in this level of detail." Among their revelations is the most complete accounting to date of the 1968 disappearance of the U.S.S. Scorpion; the story of how the Navy located a live hydrogen bomb lost by the Air Force; and a plot by the CIA and...



1421 : The Year China Discovered America
Gavin Menzies
006054094X
January 1, 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
A former submarine commander in Britain's Royal Navy, Menzies must enjoy doing battle. The amateur historian's lightly footnoted, heavily speculative re-creation of little-known voyages made by Chinese ships in the early 1400s goes far beyond what most experts in and outside of China are willing to assert and will surely set tongues wagging. According to Menzies's brazen but dull account of the Middle Kingdom's exploits at sea, Magellan, Dias, da Gama, Cabral and Cook only "discovered" lands the Chinese had already visited, and they sailed with maps drawn from Chinese charts. Menzies alleges that the Chinese not only discovered America, but also established colonies here long before Columbus set out to sea. Because China burned the records of its historic expeditions led by Zheng He, the famed eunuch admiral and...


It's Your Ship: Management Techniques from the Best Damn Ship in the Navy
D. Michael Abrashoff
0446529117
May 2002
Hardcover
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Book Review
Other than the sobering fact that real lives are regularly at stake, running a navy ship is a lot like running a business: leaders of both must get the most out of their crews to operate at peak efficiency and complete the tasks at hand. As commander of the highly acclaimed USS Benfold, Captain D. Michael Abrashoff irrefutably demonstrated how progressive management can succeed at sea; in It's Your Ship, he translates his methods into an approach that can also be applied by land-bound captains of commerce and industry. Describing "the ideas and techniques that I used to win my sailors' trust and, eventually, their enthusiastic commitment to our joint goal of making our ship the best in the fleet," Abrashoff cites embarrassing failures along with subsequent triumphs to illuminate the keys to his accomplished 20-month...


Red Star Rogue: The Untold Story of a Soviet Submarine's Nuclear Strike Attempt on the U. S.
Kenneth Sewell
0743261127
September 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
One of the great secrets of the Cold War, hidden for decades, is revealed at last.Early in 1968 a nuclear-armed Soviet submarine sank in the waters off Hawaii, hundreds of miles closer to American shores than it should have been. Compelling evidence, assembled here for the first time, strongly suggests that the sub, K-129, sank while attempting to fire a nuclear missile, most likely at the naval base at Pearl Harbor.We now know that the Soviets had lost track of the sub; it had become a rogue. While the Soviets searched in vain for the boat, U.S. intelligence was able to pinpoint the site of the disaster. The new Nixon administration launched a clandestine, half-billion-dollar project to recover the sunken K-129. Contrary to years of deliberately misleading reports, the recovery operation was a great success. With...


Seize the Fire
Adam Nicolson
0060753617
Sept 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
On October 21, 1805, the British navy crushed the combined fleets of Spain and France near Spain's Cape Trafalgar, thwarting Napoleon Bonaparte's planned invasion of England and leading to a century of British maritime dominance. There are many books on the Battle of Trafalgar, but this one is different in that Adam Nicolson focuses more on "the mental landscape" of those who fought than on the battle itself. In analyzing why the British scored such an impressive victory, Nicolson looks beyond tactics to study the collective psychology of the three navies, along with the social and cultural forces at work. Part of the study revolves around the concept of the hero at the dawn of the 19th century. The men who fought at Trafalgar "looked on battle not as a necessary evil but as a moment of revelation and truth" that played into...


Miracles on the Water : The Heroic Survivors of a World War II U-Boat Attack
Tom Nagorski
1401301509
March 8, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Nagorski, a senior producer at ABC's World News Tonight and winner of three Emmy Awards, scores a bull's-eye in his print debut with this riveting account of the sinking of a British passenger liner by a German submarine in World War II. Much of the power of the story—then and now—derives from the 90 children on board who were being carried to safety in Canada. The S.S. City of Benares, with 406 crew and passengers aboard, was 630 miles out in the North Atlantic on September 17, 1940, when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat. As the Benares sank, passengers and crew abandoned ship in the stormy waters. Those who made it into lifeboats faced gale-force winds and icy waters—a "recipe for hypothermia." With the nearest help 300 miles away, the survivors faced long odds....


The Last Shot
Lynn Schooler
0060523336
June 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
A longtime Alaskan has given us this impressive history of the last Confederate commerce raider, which fired its last shot at a Yankee whaler north of the Aleutian Islands two and a half months after Appomattox. It begins with the ship leaving England under the name Sea King, then meeting a chartered cargo ship at Madeira and loading guns and other warlike gear—without more than a fraction of the crew needed to use them. A gifted seaman if more than a little irascible, Capt. James Waddell recruited his crew as he sailed. After an eventful stop in Melbourne, Australia, the ship sailed north to the Arctic whaling grounds, ravaged the whaling fleet and was proceeding to attack the California gold ships when Waddell learned that the war was over—whereupon he set off to deliver his ship and crew to the...


History of United States Naval Operations in World War II: The Struggle for Guadalcanal, August 1942 - February 1943, Vol. 5
Samuel Eliot Morison
025206996X
August 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
During the six months covered by volume five of Samuel Eliot Morison's magnificent history, the United States Navy fought six major engagements in waters surrounding Guadalcanal, more bitter and bloody than any naval battle in American history since 1814. From the Solomon Islands campaigns to the courageous action of Edson's Raiders at the Battle of the Bloody Ridge, from the great three-day Naval Battle of Guadalcanal to the Battle of Tassafaronga, Morison describes the events of these excruciating months in thrilling, heartbreaking detail from the shipdecks, cockpits, and exposed ridgetops where the fate of thousands of soldiers and sailors was decided. "You may search the seven seas in vain for an ocean graveyard with the bones of so many ships and sailors as that body of water between Guadalcanal, Savo, and...


Cold War Submarines: The Design and Construction of U.S. and Soviet Submarines
Norman Polmar, Kenneth J. Moore
1574885944
September 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Submarines had a vital, if often unheralded, role in the superpower navies during the Cold War. Their crews carried out intelligence-collection operations, sought out and stood ready to destroy opposing submarines, and, from the early 1960s, threatened missile attacks on their adversary’s home-land, providing in many respects the most survivable nuclear deterrent of the Cold War. For both East and West, the modern submarine originated in German U-boat designs obtained at the end of World War II. Although enjoying a similar technology base, by the 1990s the superpowers had created submarine fleets of radically different designs and capabilities. Written in collaboration with the former Soviet submarine design bureaus, Norman Polmar and K. J. Moore authoritatively demonstrate in this landmark study how differing...


Nelson's Trafalgar
Roy Adkins
0670034487
Sept 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. This illustrious introduction to the Battle of Trafalgar from an archeologist and historian is one of the best in generations for the nonseafaring reader curious about the nautical epic, and it also handsomely rewards those whose study of the battle goes back a generation or two. The battle itself and its aftermath form most of the narrative, interspersed with details of gunnery, ship handling, discipline, construction, damage control and shipboard health and medicine (not for the weak of stomach). The author gives full credit to the heroism of both sides—the dismasted Spanish flagship Santa Ana; the crew of the British Belleisle, also reduced to a wreck; and the aptly named French Redoubtable, from whose tops a stray bullet killed Nelson. Also given in more than usual detail is the...


21: The Final Unfinished Voyage of Jack Aubrey (Aubrey/Maturin Series)
Patrick O'Brian
039306025X
October 30, 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
For Aubrey/Maturin addicts, there could be no better gift: a new, albeit incomplete, story with freshly piquant details, wry humor and salty nautical action. Although the official word was that O'Brian had finished the series with 1999's Blue at the Mizzen, he was in fact working on a new installment at the time of his death in 2000. This short volume juxtaposes a facsimile of O'Brian's handwritten manuscript of the untitled novel with a printed version of the text, which corresponds to O'Brian's loosely edited, typed pages. As the tale opens, our heroes are off the coast of South America, trying to find a friendly place to put the Surprise in for victuals and water. Jack Aubrey has received the happy news that he has been given the rank of rear admiral of the Blue, and all is well for the time being. But the...


Mr. Midshipman Hornblower (Horatio Hornblower Series #1)
C. S. Forester
0316289124
September 1984
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This trio offer more of the salty adventures of the title character, who sailed the ocean blue during the Napoleonic Wars.Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

The Wall Street Journal, Robert L. Simison
Mr. Forester is a more than able historical novelist, explaining many of the principles of sailing and fighting a square-rigged British man-of-war. He also has a strong command of military tactics and strategy.... --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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The Bounty
Caroline Alexander
0142004693
June 2004
Bargain - Paperback
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Book Review
Surely this exhaustingly-researched, enthralling and enthusiastically-written tome is the last word on the most famous of all seafaring mutinies, that of shipmate Fletcher Christian and against Lieutenant Bligh on the Bounty. More than 200 years have gone by since the ship left England after dreadful weather kept it harbored for months, on its mission to transport breadfruit from Tahiti to the West Indies. The mutiny in Tahiti left the mutineers scattered about the paradisiacal islands and found Bligh and 18 of his loyal crew members set adrift in a 23-foot open boat. Bligh, who'd served as Capt. James Cook's sailing master, fantastically maneuvered the crew on a 48-day, 3,600-mile journey to safety. Caroline Alexander, author of The Endurance, is never in over her head even when weaving together densely twisting...


Faith of My Fathers: A Family Memoir
John McCain
0060957867
September 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
Books by politicians are not often worth reading, but John McCain's Faith of My Fathers is an astonishing exception to the rule. The Republican senator from Arizona has a remarkable story to tell--better than just about any of his peers--and he tells it well, with crisp prose and an unexpected sense for narrative pacing. The first half of the book concerns his naval forbears: his grandfather commanded an aircraft carrier in the Second World War, while his father presided over all naval forces in the Pacific during the Vietnam War. They were the first father-son admirals in American history. Young John McCain knew he had enormous shoes to fill and rebelled against many of the expectations set for him. At the Naval Academy, he was nearly expelled, graduating fifth from the bottom of his class. He never became an admiral, but...


Patrick O'Brian's Navy: The Illustrated Companion to Jack Aubrey's World
Chris Chant (Contributor), et al
0762415401
March 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Both visually impressive and highly informative, this large-format introduction to Napoleonic naval warfare focuses on Patrick O'Brian's splendid Jack Aubrey saga, which it presents as a major work of English literature. In fact, parts of this book (including the material on Lord Cochrane, the original model for Jack Aubrey's character) will be more useful to O'Brian's fans than to the lay reader. However, the book also depicts, in words and pictures, the political background of the Napoleonic Wars, the development of the major navies, the sailors' life at sea (where weather and disease killed far more men than battles did) and the design and construction of the wooden sailing warship. The volume also details the training of officers, fleet actions, frigate actions (prominent in the career of both Cochrane and...


Hornblower and the Hotspur (Horatio Hornblower Series #3)
C. S. Forester
0316290467
November 1998
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This trio offer more of the salty adventures of the title character, who sailed the ocean blue during the Napoleonic Wars.Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
The problem with Hornblower books is that they are addictive...not just to youngsters, but to adults as well. Winston Churchill, for instance, read them en route to naval rendezvous during WW II. --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

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The Encyclopedia of Yacht Designers
Lucia Del Sol Knight (Editor), Daniel Bruce MacNaughton (Editor)
0393048764
October 31, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
A complete, international reference book of yacht designers from the early 1800s to the present day.This long-awaited volume is a majestic guide and a tribute to the world's great yacht designers. Ten years in preparation, and with an expert editorial board giving it direction, The Encyclopedia of Yacht Designers defines the field with fascinating entries by eighty experts and over 800 photographs and drawings. In these pages such legendary figures from the past as William Fife, L. Francis Herreshoff, and John Alden share space with contemporary designers such as Jon Bannenberg, Germán Frers, and Ron Holland. They are joined by over five hundred others who have contributed to the colorful history of yachting, producing some of the most beautiful and swift vessels, whether sail or power. 800 duotone photographs. ...


Ironclad
Paul Clancy
0071431322
Sept 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
The true story of the Civil War ironclad that saved the Union Navy only to sink in a storm--and its remarkable salvage 140 years later Ironclad tells the saga of the warship USS Monitor and its salvage, one of the most complex and dangerous in history. The Monitor is followed through its maiden voyage from New York to Hampton Roads, its battle with the Merrimack , and its loss off Cape Hatteras. At the same time, author Paul Clancy takes readers behind the scenes of an improbable collaboration between navy divers and cautious archaeologists working 240 feet deep. Clancy creates a memorable, fascinating read, including fresh insights into the sinking of the Union ship and giving the answer to an intriguing forensic mystery: the identities of the two sailors whose bones were found in the Monitor 's recovered...


Master and Commander
Patrick O'Brian
0393307050
August 1990
Paperback
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Book Review
The opening salvo of the Aubrey-Maturin epic, in which the surgeon introduces himself to the captain by driving an elbow into his ribs during a chamber-music recital. Fortunately for millions of readers, the two quickly make up. Then they commence one of the great literary voyages of our century, set against an immaculately-detailed backdrop of the Napoleonic wars. This is the place to start--and in all likelihood, you won't be able to stop.

Book Review Audiobook Review
Since Patrick O'Brian launched his series of historical novels with Master and Commander in 1970, millions of readers have enjoyed the adventures of Captain Jack Aubrey and his friend, surgeon Stephen Maturin. O'Brian's prose, so immediate and yet so distinctly capturing the language and culture of the English navy...

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