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War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict
Donald R. Hickey
0252060598
September 1990
Paperback
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Book Review
The War of 1812 gave the United States some of its finest military moments: Admiral Perry's victory on Lake Erie, Andrew Jackson's lopsided triumph at the Battle of New Orleans, the immortal words "Don't give up the ship!," and Fort McHenry's defense of Baltimore (which inspired Francis Scott Key to write "The Star-Spangled Banner"). At the same time, the fighting didn't go especially well for the Americans. Their invasion of Canada failed and the British burned the White House to the ground. The conflict ended in a draw. With The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict Donald R. Hickey offers what may be the most comprehensive treatment of the war, and includes many colorful anecdotes. For example, shortly after the mortally wounded James Lawrence uttered "Don't give up the ship!," his men...


Sharpe's Sword: Richard Sharpe and the Salamanca Campaign June and July, 1812 (Sharpe's Adventures)
Bernard Cornwell
0140294333
April 2001
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This fifth novel in the saga of British rifleman Richard Sharpe (e.g., Sharpe's Regiment, Audio Reviews, LJ 9/15/96) is set in Wellington's Salamanca Campaign of 1811-12 during the Peninsular War. After meeting a fiendish enemy who becomes his personal nemesis, Sharpe repeatedly comes perilously close to death, while playing a pivotal role in the campaign. Meanwhile, he has a torrid affair with a beautiful Spanish aristocrat who may not be what she seems. Sharpe regulars will find all this familiar and predictable, but Cornwell sustains such convincing dramatic tension that there is never a dull moment. The book is guaranteed to rivet all but the squeamish. William Gaminara's reading is less mannered than his previous efforts. Still, American listeners might prefer Frederick Davidson's readings of Blackstone...


The Fortune of War
Patrick O'Brian
0393308138
August 1991
Paperback
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Amazon.com
This time it's the War of 1812 that gets in the way of Captain Jack Aubery's plans. Caught en route to England in a dispatch vessel, Aubrey and Maturin are soon in the thick of a typically bloody naval engagement. Next stop: an American prison, from which only Maturin's cunning allows them to engineer an exit.

Times Literary Supplement
The Fortune of War is a marvellously full-flavored, engrossing book, which towers over its current rivals in the genre like a three-decker over a ship's longboat.

See all Editorial Reviews


Naval War of 1812
Theodore Roosevelt
0375754199
May 1999
Paperback
·
 
Review
"A classic of naval history."  --Edmund Morris

"An excellent book in every respect, and shows in so young an author the best promises for a good historian."
--The New York Times

Book Description
Published when Theodore Roosevelt was only twenty-three years old, The Naval War of 1812 was immediately hailed as a literary and scholarly triumph, and it is still considered the definitive book on the subject. It caused considerable controversy for its bold refutation of earlier accounts of the war, but its brilliant analysis and balanced tone left critics floundering, changed the course of U.S. military history by renewing interest in our obsolete forces, and set the young author and political hopeful on a path to greatness. Roosevelt's...


With Napoleon in Russia: The Illustrated Memoirs of Faber Du Faur, 1812
Christian Wilhelm Von Faber Du Faur, Jonathan North (Editor)
1853674540
August 2001
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The Stuttgart-born career soldier Christian Wilhelm von Faber du Faur (1780-1857) served for years in the Napoleonic army, like a vast number of able-bodied mercenaries of his day. Also an amateur artist, Faber du Faur drew sketches of what he saw on the campaigns, and these were reproduced in colored plates in varied editions through his lifetime, with various texts in German and French. Popular military historian North (In the Legions of Napoleon, etc.) has translated prose captions from one of Faber du Faur's editions. (Other editions included poetry, making this a debatable choice.) The 92 plates are very much by an amateur artist, someone dedicated to showing detail, but stiffly, without emotiveness. Yet any fan of "outsider" art will feel their strange immediacy, as if the artist were struggling toward an...


Fighting Sail on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay
Barry Gough
1557503141
May 2002
Hardcover
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The International History Review, December 2003
"...a fine study, filled with details, personalities, and events that bring an era and its people to life."

Book Description
Canadian Barry Gough's new work makes an important and long-awaited contribution to our understanding of the struggle for domination in the Upper Great Lakes and the American heartland during the War of 1812. A critical time for both the old northwest and the peoples who lived along the U.S.-Canadian border, it was also a time when the territories that became Wisconsin and Minnesota were formed, the fur trade was established, and the Indian nations attempted to preserve both their homeland and their independence. It is a unique study in that it goes far beyond the Battle of Lake Erie, where traditional historical accounts...


1812: The War That Forged a Nation
Walter R. Borneman
0060531126
October 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This thoroughly readable popular history of the War of 1812 may exaggerate in its claim that the war forged America’s national identity; after all, there were enough regional identities left lying around after the conflict to cause a national civil war. But otherwise it’s a fine narrative history that traces the major of events of the war, from the preliminary plots by James Wilkinson and Aaron Burr that revealed the ambitions of Westerners for territorial expansion, through New England’s secessionist Hartford Convention to the Battle of New Orleans, which wrapped up the war in 1815. Borneman makes clear that the performance of the American army was mostly disgraceful, that the Canadians can pat themselves on the back for courage and endurance and that the decisive victory of the American navy was...


When the Mississippi Ran Backwards : Empire, Intrigue, Murder, and the New Madrid Earthquakes
Jay Feldman
0743242785
March 1, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The shocks that devastated the Mississippi River town of New Madrid, Mo., and environs in the winter of 1812 were among the strongest earthquakes in America's history. But in human terms they were fairly inconsequential (about 100 people died in the lightly populated area), hence the resort to empire, intrigue and murder to flesh out this engaging if haphazard survey of the Mississippi valley frontier. Journalist and scriptwriter Feldman gives a lucid rundown of the geology and seismology of the quakes and skillfully deploys sparse firsthand memoirs of the disaster to describe the titanic upheavals of earth and water that terrified onlookers. But that leaves most of the book still to write, so he brings in other developments tenuously related to the earthquake and the region. These include the brutal Indian wars...


The War of 1812
Harry Coles
0226113507
Aug 1966
Paperback
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Book Description
This compact history of the war attempts to separate myth from reality. Professor Coles narrates the main operations on both land and sea of the three-year struggle. He examines the conflict from the British (and Canadian) as well as the American point of view, relating events in America to the larger war going on in Europe.

"A balanced analysis of tactics and strategy, this book also summarizes succinctly and clearly recent scholarship on causes and describes briefly the war's military, economic, and political consequences. Coles has surveyed thoroughly the existing literature but arrives at a number of independent judgments. It is the best single-volume account of the war in all its aspects. In recounting sea battles, Coles puts aside the patriotic blinders that have for so long prevented a sensible...


1812: The War That Forged a Nation
Walter R. Borneman
0060531134
October 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This thoroughly readable popular history of the War of 1812 may exaggerate in its claim that the war forged America’s national identity; after all, there were enough regional identities left lying around after the conflict to cause a national civil war. But otherwise it’s a fine narrative history that traces the major of events of the war, from the preliminary plots by James Wilkinson and Aaron Burr that revealed the ambitions of Westerners for territorial expansion, through New England’s secessionist Hartford Convention to the Battle of New Orleans, which wrapped up the war in 1815. Borneman makes clear that the performance of the American army was mostly disgraceful, that the Canadians can pat themselves on the back for courage and endurance and that the decisive victory of the American navy was...


The Fortune of War
Patrick O'Brian
0786179945
August 2005
Compact Disc
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Book Description
Captain Jack Aubrey, R.N., arrives in the Dutch East Indies to find himself appointed to the command of the fastest and best-armed frigate in the Royal Navy. He and his friend Stephen Maturin take passage for England in a dispatch vessel, but the War of 1812 breaks out while they are en route. Bloody actions precipitate them both into new and unexpected scenes where Stephen’s past activities as a secret agent return on him with a vengeance.

About the Author
From the Master & Commander Series


The Rivers of War
Eric Flint
0345465679
May 17, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. The first of a projected two-volume series, Flint's witty, tightly written alternative history presents a subtly revised version of events in the final year of the War of 1812. In March 1814, in the Mississippi Territory, Gen. Andrew Jackson's Tennessee Militia and Cherokee warriors fight a decisive battle against the Creek Indians. In August, a young Sam Houston, the adopted son of a Cherokee chief, arrives in Washington in time to help defend the Capitol building from invading British troops. The British fail to reach Fort McHenry, but they do get to New Orleans, where they adopt a slightly more intelligent plan of attack than in reality. While the enlightened political and racial attitudes of some white characters may seem unrealistic, such views weren't unheard of even in the South before...


The Far Side of the World
Patrick O'Brian
0393308626
March 1992
Paperback
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Book Review
Captain Jack Aubrey sets sail for Cape Horn, determined to intercept an American frigate before it can wreak havoc on the British whaling trade. As always, he is accompanied by intelligence operative Stephen Maturin, and as always, Aubrey has no idea of what his companion is up to. Another impeccably written adventure, by the end of which you should be able to identify a mizzen topsail in your sleep.

Thoma Flanagan, New York Times Book Review
These eccentric, improbable novels seem to have been written by Patrick O'Brian to please himself in the first instance, and thereafter to please those readers who may share his delight in precision of language, odd lands and colors, a humane respect for such old-fashioned sentiments as friendship and honor. Like Aubrey and Maturin playing...


War and Peace (Penguin Classics)
Leo Tolstoy, Rosemary Edmonds (Introduction)
0140444173
July 29, 1982
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Thanks to British narrator Frederick Davidson's performance, it is safe to say that there will not be a better recording of Tolstoy's masterpiece for some time. The heart of this drama is the metamorphosis of five familiesAsome peasant, some aristocraticAamid the backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars. Each individual is immersed in experiences and conversations elucidating Tolstoy's themes of self-sacrifice and self-indulgence, anguish and ecstasy, diplomacy and deception, and religion and perdition. The complexities of character and plot are sometimes enigmatic, and names are often exhausting to recollect, but the genius of this book is everlasting. The impressive dialog sparkles with humor and wit, and the vivid scenes of battle are riveting. An entire universe is created by one of the foremost thinkers of the 19th...


The War of 1812
Donald R. Hickey
0252064305
Mar 1995
Paperback
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The Fire Along the Sky
Sara Donati
0553582771
November 2005
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Donati continues the saga of the valiant Bonner family, last seen in 2002's Lake in the Clouds, in this sprawling, slow-to-start epic starring four formidable women. It's 1812, and Elizabeth Bonner—teacher, crusader and second wife of hunter/trapper/farmer Nathaniel—is still living in a mountain cabin above the village of Paradise in upper New York State. With her is her restless, independent daughter, Lily, whose plans to study art in England were dashed by the beginnings of the war. Nearby in Montreal is the newly widowed Scotswoman Lady Jennet, who has come to the new world to find the man she should have married, Nathaniel's son Luke. And arriving presently is Hannah, Nathaniel's half-Mohawk daughter by his first wife; after 10 years as a healer with her mother's people, Hannah comes home to...


The War of 1812
John K. Mahon
0306804298
Apr 1991
Paperback
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Moscow 1812: Napoleon's Fatal March [BARGAIN PRICE]
Adam Zamoyski
B000EBCPDU
August 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This massive study of Napoleon's famous Russian campaign may rank as the best recent study in English. Napoleon's exclusion of English trade from the Continent and Czar Alexander's territorial ambitions in Central Europe were just two elements in a collision that really did have an epic quality, to which the book's painstaking detail, balanced judgments, thoroughness of research and fluent writing do full justice. Napoleon, Alexander and their entourages are fully characterized, as are crafty Kutuzov, dashing Murat (who ruined the French cavalry) and the indomitable or inept of lesser rank. The outcome, Zamoyski shows, turned on logistics, with the French advancing inexorably farther from their bases, and strategy, in which Napoleon failed either to destroy the Russian army in a single campaign or to accept a...


Amateurs, to Arms!
John R. Elting
0306806533
Sept 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
No other conflict in our history found us so unready or ill-prepared as the War of 1812, argues Elting, who here presents the military side of the war and emphasizes the amateurishness of the Americans who managed to win their "Second War of Independence" despite themselves. Tactical victories, few and far between, made the difference in the end: Oliver Perry's destruction of a British squadron on Lake Erie in 1813, William Henry Harrison's defeat of a British column the following year at the Battle of the Thames. Ironically, the most celebrated clash of the war, Andrew Jackson's 1815 victory at New Orleans, took place two weeks after the signing of the peace treaty at Ghent in Belgium. Elting ( The Superstrategists ) tells the story from the British side as well as the American. He includes a memorable account...


Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times
H. W. Brands
0385507380
October 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Historian Brands, author of the bestselling The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin, now turns to Andrew Jackson (1767–1845), illuminating both the mettle of a fascinating leader and the crucible in which American democracy was forged. A military hero during the War of 1812 and winner of the popular presidential vote in 1824 (he lost the election in Congress), Jackson won the office handily in 1828. Brands argues that the populist Jackson changed the very nature of the presidency, vetoing more bills than all six of his predecessors combined; thwarting the bank of the United States; and in a dramatic test of wills, preparing for civil war when South Carolina threatened to secede over tariffs. He died at the age of 78, just days after learning that Texas would join the...


Sharpe's Company (Sharpe)
Bernard Cornwell
0451213424
August 3, 2004
Paperback
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From AudioFile
Life for the common soldier in the British army at the Siege of Badajoz, Spain, in 1803, was harsh; battles were won with the bayonet and clubbed rifle. Besides meager wages, his prospects included mutilation, painful death and an unmarked grave in hostile lands. In this thoroughly British production Gaminara reads with a clear, English accent. Although he reads at a crisp pace, his subtle inflection and keenness in telling the story keep the listener glued to every word. Each character has an easily distinguishable voice, which rings true. With repeated instances of rape, mayhem and pillage, this story is a none-too-subtle reminder that the Anglo-Saxon heritage is not all royal weddings and Masterpiece Theater. m.f.p. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition....


War of 1812
Carl Benn
1841764663
October 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
The War of 1812-1815 was a bloody confrontation that tore through the American frontier, the British colonies of Upper and Lower Canada, and parts of the Atlantic coast and the Gulf of Mexico. The conflict saw British, American, and First Nations' forces clash, and in the process, shape the future of North American history. This exciting new volume explains what led to America's decision to take up arms against Great Britain and assesses the three terrible years of fighting that followed on land and sea, where battles such as Lake Erie and Lake Champlain launched American naval traditions.

From the Publisher
This unique series studies every major war in history looking at all the aspects of war, from how it felt to be a soldier to the lasting impact of the conflict on the world...


The Naval War of 1812
Theodore Roosevelt
0306809109
Apr 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Published when Theodore Roosevelt was only twenty-three years old, The Naval War of 1812 was immediately hailed as a literary and scholarly triumph, and it is still considered the definitive book on the subject. It caused considerable controversy for its bold refutation of earlier accounts of the war, but its brilliant analysis and balanced tone left critics floundering, changed the course of U.S. military history by renewing interest in our obsolete forces, and set the young author and political hopeful on a path to greatness. Roosevelt's inimitable style and robust narrative make The Naval War of 1812 enthralling, illuminating, and utterly essential to every armchair historian.
    
The books in the Modern Library War series have been chosen by series editor Caleb Carr according to...

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