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The Russian Revolution: 1917-1918 (History SparkNotes)
SparkNotes Editors
1411404300
July 2005
Paperback
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It Had to Be Revolution
Charles Shipman
0801421802
May 1993
(Hardcover) - Italian
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From Publishers Weekly
Although Shipman (1895-1989) was not a leader of the American left, his exceptionally vivid memoir recalls an unusual life and evokes the spirit of early 20th-century radicalism. Born Charles Phillips in New York City, he discovered socialism while a student at Columbia University. He first attracted attention in 1918, when he resisted induction into the Army. Subsequently, he fled to Mexico, where, using one of a series of pseudonyms, he met the Soviet ambassador Michael Borodin. In 1920, he attended the Second Congress of the Communist International in Moscow and was impressed by the charismatic Lenin. His path eventually led to Chicago, where as Manuel Gomez, he joined the then-clandestine Communist Party. By 1929 he was in New York City again, as Charles Shipman, a secretly anti-capitalist financial...


The Russian Roots of Nazism : White ¿migr¿s and the Making of National Socialism, 1917-1945 (New Studies in European History)
Michael Kellogg
0521845122
March 7, 2005
Hardcover
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Review
'Michael Kellogg's The Russian Roots of Nazism is a major contribution to the research on the origins of Nazism. In a domain where so much has been published and discussed, Kellogg's work succeeds in introducing a dimension never so thoroughly explored: the essential impact on early Nazi world-view of ideological elements and political themes, carried over to Germany by White-Russian emigres.' Professor Saul Friedlander, 1939 Club Chair in Holocaust Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles and Maxwell Cummings Chair of European History at Tel Aviv University

Review
"Michael Kellogg's The Russian Roots of Nazism is a major contribution to the research on the origins of Nazism. In a domain where so much has been published and discussed, Kellogg's work succeeds in introducing...


Rulers and Victims: The Russians of the Soviet Union
Geoffrey Hosking
0674021789
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
For much of the U.S.S.R.'s existence, there was no such thing as a Russian, reveals Hosking in his follow-up to 1997's Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917. That particular ethnic identity was banned by the Communist authorities. Instead, all those inhabiting the czars' ancient territories were designated "Soviets" by their new ideological overlords. The name change did nothing to temper the impression of foreigners and the Soviet Union's many other unwilling nationalities that the U.S.S.R. was Russia, a violent imperial entity run by and for Russians. Indeed, Russians believed themselves to be "helpful comrades" who had a right to spread the Gospel of Marx—in a form adapted to accommodate "Russian myths and symbols dating right back to the sixteenth century." But Hosking also argues that there is an...


The Cultural Front
Sheila Fitzpatrick
0801495164
Nov 1992
Paperback
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The Cambridge Companion to Modern Russian Culture (Cambridge Companions to Culture)
Nicholas Rzhevsky (Editor)
0521477999
February 25, 1999
Paperback
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Review
"The Companion is a useful tool... It provides neat introductions to the familiar faces and movements in Russian artistic history..." Susan Costanzo, H-Net Reviews

"...these wide-ranging and stimulating essays synthesize modern scholarship, provide useful material for the specialist, and serve as a helpful reference work for the reader already familiar with modern Russian culture." Robert C. Williams, Slavic Review

"[The book] will be utterly useful and enjoyable for students and individuals with advanced knowledge of Russia as well as for Slavic scholars." Victoria Richter, Slavic and East European Journal

Book Description
This volume offers an introduction to Russian culture in all its rich diversity, including the historical conditions that helped shape it and the arts...



The Gulag Archipelago 1918-1956
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
0060007761
January 2002
Paperback
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Book Description

Drawing on his own incarceration and exile, as well as on evidence from more than 200 fellow prisoners and Soviet archives, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn reveals the entire apparatus of Soviet repression -- the state within the state that ruled all-powerfully.

Through truly Shakespearean portraits of its victims -- men, women, and children -- we encounter secret police operations, labor camps and prisons; the uprooting or extermination of whole populations, the "welcome" that awaited Russian soldiers who had been German prisoners of war. Yet we also witness the astounding moral courage of the incorruptible, who, defenseless, endured great brutality and degradation. The Gulag Archipelago 1918-1956 -- a grisly indictment of a regime, fashioned here into a veritable literary miracle -- has now been updated with a...



Review for the CLEP Social Science and History Examination
Ann Garvin, Eileen Curristine
1560301503
March 26, 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
This study guide contains all the information you need to pass the Social Science and History CLEP test. It has been updated to prepare you to do well on the new computerized version of the test as well as on the older paper based test. Comex Systems, Inc. has been the leading CLEP test preparation company for over 30 years.


Interpreting America
John Ryder
0826513344
Apr 1999
Hardcover
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Book Description
More scholarly works on the history of American philosophy have been completed in Russian than in any other language outside of our own; yet most of that body of work has not been translated or studied comprehensively. Consequently, Soviet-era efforts to understand American thought have remained almost entirely unknown to Western scholars. In his pioneering new book, Interpreting America, John Ryder makes available for the first time to English-speaking readers Russian views of the full range of American philosophical thought: from seventeenth-century Puritanism through the colonial and revolutionary periods, nineteenth-century idealism, pragmatism, naturalism, and other twentieth-century movements and figures. Using his own accurate translations, he clearly reconstructs a chain of core ideas, emphasizes the most...


The Cold War: 1945-1963 (History SparkNotes)
SparkNotes Editors
141140422X
July 2005
Paperback
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Thinking Theoretically about Soviet Nationalities
Alexander J. Motyl
023107512X
Apr 1995
Hardcover
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Slavic Review
In bringing together this set of authors, Motyl makes a giant stride toward his main goals: to make Soviet nationality studies 'theoretical' and to make these studies part of the wider literature in ethnic studies. He assembles terrific diversity in theoretical approach and regional expertise. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description
-- Slavic Review

See all Editorial Reviews


DSST Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union (DANTES series)
Jack Rudman
0837366798
January 1, 2005
Plastic Comb
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Thinking Theoretically about Soviet Nationalities
Alexander J. Motyl
0231075138
Sept 1995
Paperback
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Slavic Review
In bringing together this set of authors, Motyl makes a giant stride toward his main goals: to make Soviet nationality studies 'theoretical' and to make these studies part of the wider literature in ethnic studies. He assembles terrific diversity in theoretical approach and regional expertise.

Book Description
-- Slavic Review

See all Editorial Reviews


Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency from the Cold War through the Dawn of a New Century
James Bamford
0385499086
April 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
Everybody knows about the CIA--the cloak-and-dagger branch of the U.S. government. Many fewer are familiar with the National Security Agency, even though it has been more important to American espionage in recent years than its better-known counterpart. The NSA is responsible for much of the intelligence gathering done via technology such as satellites and the Internet. Its home office in Maryland "contains what is probably the largest body of secrets ever created."

Little was known about the agency's confidential culture until veteran journalist James Bamford blew the lid off in 1982 with his bestseller The Puzzle Palace. Still, much remained in the shadows. In Body of Secrets, Bamford throws much more light on his subject--and he reveals loads of shocking information. The story of the U-2 crisis in 1960 is well known,...



The Jewish Century
Yuri Slezkine
0691119953
September 2004
Textbook Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The provocative argument that underlies this idiosyncratic, fascinating and at times marvelously infuriating study of the evolution of Jewish cultural and political sensibility is that the 20th century is the Jewish Age because "modernization is about everyone becoming urban, mobile, literate, articulate, intellectually intricate.... Modernization, in other words, is about everyone becoming Jewish." A professor of history at UC-Berkeley, Slezkine plays a delicate game here. Knowing that his grand statements are more metaphorical than supportable with historical fact, he maps out a new history of Jewish culture over the past 100 years in four radically diverse but cohesive chapters. In a history of Jewish group identity and function, Slezkine depicts Jews as a nomadic tribe that functions as a promoter of urban...


Colossus Reborn: The Red Army At War, 1941-1943 (Modern War Studies)
David M. Glantz
0700613536
February 24, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
In Stumbling Colossus, David Glantz explored why the Red Army was unprepared for the German blitzkrieg that nearly destroyed it and left more than four million of its soldiers dead by the end of 1941. In Colossus Reborn he recounts the miraculous resurrection of the Red Army, which, with a dazzling display of military strategy and operational prowess, stopped the Wehrmacht in its tracks and turned the tide of war. A major achievement in the recovery and preservation of an entire nation's military experience, Colossus Reborn is marked by Glantz's unrivaled access to and use of Soviet archival sources. This allows him to illuminate not only Russian victories in the Battles of Moscow, Stalingrad, and Kursk, but also to rescue a host of major "forgotten battles," many of which had been suppressed to preserve reputations...


Managing Conflict in the Former Soviet Union: Russian and American Perspectives (BCSIA Studies in International Security)
Alexei Arbatov (Editor), et al
0262510936
October 24, 1997
Paperback
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Book Description
Since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union, numerous ethnic and internal conflicts have emerged within and between the former Soviet republics. Vicious fighting has flared up in Georgia, Chechnya, Tajikistan, Moldova, and other areas, and tensions remain high in many of the newly independent states. Their causes are often misunderstood, and U.S. policymakers have paid little attention to their resolution.

This collaborative effort by Russian and American scholars documents Russian policy toward ethno-national conflict in its "near-abroad", American policy toward these conflicts, and the attempts of international organizations to prevent and resolve them. Case studies consider the causes, dynamics, and prospects of conflicts in Latvia, the Crimea, the Trans-dneistr region of Moldova, Georgia, Kazakhstan,...


And the Sea Is Never Full: Memoirs, 1969-
Elie Wiesel
0641677286

Hardcover
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Kino: A History of the Russian and Soviet Film
Jay Leyda
0691003467
August 1, 1983
Paperback
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Amazon.com
"The Battleship Potemkin," "By the Law," "Mother," "Earth," "Man With a Movie Camera," "Alexander Nevsky": Russia and the Soviet Union produced some of the greatest films the world has ever seen. Leyda has written a riveting history of the pioneers and artists who made these films. His acclaimed book tells the story of the industry that spawned them and the revolution that both inspired and crushed them.


1968: The Year That Rocked the World
Mark Kurlansky
0345455827
January 2005
Paperback
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Book Review
Given its broad and vibrant subject, it would be quite difficult for a writer of any proficiency to pen a boring book on 1968, and Mark Kurlansky has indeed pulled together an entertaining and enlightening popular history with 1968: The Year That Rocked the World. With the Vietnam War and Soviet repression providing sparkplugs in the East and West, student movements heated up in Berkeley, Prague, Mexico City, Paris, and dozens of other hotspots. With youth in ascendancy, music, film, and athletics became generational battlegrounds between opposition forces that couldn't be more appalled with one another. Not so fortuitously, the Summer Olympics in Mexico City and a presidential election in the United States conspired to elevate the tension higher as months passed. Kurlansky is skilled at concisely capturing the personalities...


The Soviet Tragedy: A History of Socialism in Russia, 1917-1991
Martin E. Malia
0684823136
February 1996
Textbook Paperback
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Book Review
If the Bolshevik revolution shook the world, the 74-year reign of socialists in the former Soviet Union certainly changed it. Now that the rule is over--at least for the moment--historians are beginning the process of placing the experience into its political, social and global contexts. Martin Malia, a former history professor at the University of California, Berkeley, has contributed mightily to that process with this comprehensive look at the entire period of socialist rule, from its origins to the roots of its collapse. He leaves no conceptual stone unturned, providing lively insights to ideas and ideologies while offering a complete summary of the complex history. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly
This shrewd analysis of the failure...


Nationalist Mobilization and the Collapse of the Soviet State (Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics)
Mark R. Beissinger, et al
052100148X
February 4, 2002
Paperback
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Review
'... a very serious analytical work, which, no doubt, will attract the attention of many political scientists, especially those studying political processes in Russia and in the post-Soviet area ... important for the understanding of nationalism as a social and political phenomenon.' e-Extreme, Electronic Newsletter of the ECPR-SG on Extremism and Democracy
'... a fresh-minded intervention ... fascinating reading ...'. Nations and Nationalism

Review
"This important book should be an essential tool in a variety of social science disciplines." American Journal of Sociology

"This important book should be an essential tool in a variety of social science disciplines." American Journal of Sociology

"Nationalist Mobilization and the Collapse of the Soviet State is a big, original...



Prophecy and Politics : Socialism, Nationalism, and the Russian Jews, 1862-1917 (Cambridge Paperback Library)
Jonathan Frankel
0521269199
November 8, 1984
Paperback
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Review
' ... will undoubtedly come to be regarded as the definitive political history of Russian Jews and left-wing nationalism in English or any other language.' The American Historical Review
'Frankel's book is impressive, demanding a patient and attentive reading. It is well-researched and, while ranging widely, never loses sight of its central theses. It is an indispensable work for the study of the fertile and extended world of Russian Jewry.' The Slavic Review
'(his) feat of imaginative scholarly evocation leaves the reader with a rare sense of intellectual exhilaration.' The Times Literary Supplement

Book Description
In the period from 1881 to 1917 socialist movements flourished in every major centre of Russian Jewish life, but, despite common foundations, there was often...


What Ifs of American History: Eminent Historians Imagne What Might Have Been
Robert Cowley (Editor)
0425198189
September 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The 18 contributors to this latest installment of the What If? series are indeed eminent: they include David McCullough, Tom Fleming and Robert Dallek (though series editor Cowley might have found more than one woman for his roster). For historians whose works are bound by facts, there must have been pleasure in letting their imaginations engage instead in speculation, though the "shadow universe" presented here is still rooted in the historical record and reflects back on it. In "Might the Mayflower not have sailed?", for example, Theodore K. Rabb enumerates a series of "strokes of luck" that enabled the Pilgrims to come to America, including Sir Edwin Sandys's propitious takeover of the Virginia Company. And in "What if Watergate Was Still Just an Upscale Address?", Lawrence Malkin and John Stacks wonder what...

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