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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms
Chris Baldick
0198608837
May 2004
Paperback
·
 

Book Description
Containing over 1,000 of the most troublesome literary terms encountered by students and general readers, this gem of a book gives clear and often witty explanations to terms such as hypertext, multi-accentuality, and postmodernism. The dictionary also provides extensive coverage of traditional drama, rhetoric, literary history, and textual criticism. It offers pronunciation guides and suggestions for further reading for many entries, and includes a new preface and terms that have become prominent in literature in the last few years, such as cyberpunk and antanaclasis. This second edition is the most up-to-date and accessible dictionary of literary terms available, popular with both students and teachers of literature at all levels.

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"Some of the Best Literary Criticism...



The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms
Chris Baldick
019280118X
Jan 2001
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Of the many recent dictionaries of literary terms, Baldick's is the one most likely to satisfy today's student. Rejecting "encyclopaedic completeness," it omits commonly understood general terms that are not specifically literary (e.g., art, culture, etc.). Included instead are "many terms generated by the growth of academic literary theory in recent years." The explanations are clear and succinct, and often employ illustrative examples. An uncommon feature of this work is its pronunciation guide, applied to some 200 of the 1000 terms here defined. In addition to the attention paid to the terminology of classical rhetoric, there is a distinct emphasis on French deconstructionist terms derived from Derrida, Barthes, et al. Baldick's chief rival is Northrop Frye's Harper Handbook to Literature (1985), which is more...


Melmoth the Wanderer
Charles Maturin
0192835920
Nov 1998
Paperback
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Book Description
Written by an eccentric Anglican curate in Dublin, Melmoth the Wanderer brought the terrors of the Gothic novel to a new pitch of claustrophobic intensity. Its tormented villain, a Faustian transgressor desperately seeking a victim to release him from his fatal bargain with the devil, was regarded by Balzac as one of the great outcasts of modern literature.

About the Author
Charles Robert Maturin (1782-1824), an ordained clergyman in the Church of Ireland, wrote several Irish romances, in addition to his Gothic novels.

Victor Sage is Reader in Literature at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, and has written fiction as well as critical work on the Gothic tradition. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


The Vampyre and Other Tales of the Macabre
John Polidori
0192838946
Apr 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
John Polidori's classic tale "The Vampyre"(1819), was a product of the same ghost-story competition that produced Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The present volume selects thirteen other tales of mystery and the macabre, including the works of James Hogg, J.S. LeFanu, Letitia Landon, Edward
Bulwer, and William Carelton. The introduction surveys the genesis and influence of "The Vampyre" and its central themes and techniques, while the Appendices contain material closely associated with its composition and publication, including Lord Byron's prose fragment "Augustus Darvell."


The Oxford Book of Gothic Tales
Chris Baldick
0192862197
Nov 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The fog-enshrouded castle, the crumbling family manor; old secrets unveiled, curses cast, chains clanking, fear and trembling; dread, decay, disintegration, death--each of these trademarks of the well-made Gothic tale is vividly represented in this comprehensive anthology. Informatively introduced and chronologically arranged, the 37 stories showcase the Gothic tradition from its late-18th-century inception up to the present. Included are genre classics from such illustrious practitioners as Poe, Hawthorne, Lovecraft and McGrath, as well as gems from literary masters like Faulkner, Welty, Oates and Borges, all of whom dabble(d) to fine effect in the form. Among the highlights are "The Parricide Punished," an anonymous entry from 1799 set in an enormous castle and narrated by a guest whose visit becomes a waking...


In Frankenstein's Shadow
Chris Baldick
0198122497
Aug 1990
Paperback
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Book Description
The story of Frankenstein and the monster he created is one of our most important modern myths. This study surveys the history of the myth in literature before the advent of film. First examining the range of meanings generated by Mary Shelley's Frankenstein in light of images of political
"monstrosity" produced by the French Revolution, Baldick goes on to trace the protean transformations of the myth in the fiction of Hoffmann, Hawthorne, Dickens, Melville, Conrad, and Lawrence, as well as in the historical and political writings of Carlyle and Marx and the science fiction of
Stevenson and Wells. In conclusion, he shows that the myth's most powerful associations have centered on human relationships, the family, work, and politics.


The Oxford English Literary History
Chris Baldick
0198183100
Oct 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more.

Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and the ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English
Literature, but all serious readers.

This exciting new volume provides a freshly inclusive account of literature in England in the period before, during, and after the First World War. Chris Baldick places the modernist achievements of Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, and James Joyce within the rich context of non-modernist writings across
all...


The Modern Movement
Chris Baldick
0199288348
Jan 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more.

Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and the ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in
English Literature, but all serious readers.

This exciting new volume provides a freshly inclusive account of literature in England in the period before, during, and after the First World War. Chris Baldick places the modernist achievements of Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, and James Joyce within the rich context of non-modernist writings
across...

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