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The Man Who Walked Between the Towers
Mordicai Gerstein
0761317910
September 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This effectively spare, lyrical account chronicles Philippe Petit's tight rope walk between Manhattan's World Trade Center towers in 1974. Gerstein (What Charlie Heard) begins the book like a fairytale, "Once there were two towers side by side. They were each a quarter of a mile high... The tallest buildings in New York City." The author casts the French aerialist and street performer as the hero: "A young man saw them rise into the sky.... He loved to walk and dance on a rope he tied between two trees." As the man makes his way across the rope from one tree to the other, the towers loom in the background. When Philippe gazes at the twin buildings, he looks "not at the towers but at the space between them.... What a wonderful place to stretch a rope; a wire on which to walk." Disguised as construction workers, he...


Carolinda Clatter
Mordicai Gerstein
159643063X
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review

Book Review's Significant Seven
Mordicai Gerstein graciously agreed to answer the questions we like to ask every author: the Book Review Significant Seven.


Q: What book has had the most significant impact on your life?A: Alice in Wonderland. I read it as a child, and then read it to each of my three children, and it always knocked me out.
Q: You are stranded on a desert island with only one book, one CD, and one DVD--what are they?
A: The book: The most complete anthology of poetry in English from earliest to now. The music: Bach's Well Tempered Clavier, books one and two. The movie: Beat the Devil.

Q: What is the worst lie you've ever told?
A: I never tell lies.

Q: Describe the perfect writing environment.
A:...


Wild Boy
Mordicai Gerstein
0374483965
September 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Nature and civilization collide in this thought-provoking picture book based on the story of a boy discovered living alone in the mountain forests of southern France in 1800. Hunters are first to see the boy scampering in the woods, where he had survived on plants and berries and the icy mountain-stream water. Captured, the boy is later brought to Paris's Institute for Deaf-Mutes, where experts test and examine him, and finally determine that he is "hopeless." Happily, one doctor thinks otherwise and welcomes the boy into his home, teaching him skills and caring for him. "He will never learn to speak," the doctor eventually realizes. "He was alone in the silent woods too long. But he has learned to have feelings, and they can be hurt." Gerstein's (The Story of May) detailed and informative text clearly reflects a...


Frankenstein Moved in on the Fourth Floor
Elizabeth Levy
0064401227
Mar 1981
Paperback
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Book Description
Is Frankenstein living next door?

"The new neighbor is weird," Sam whispers to Robert.

"He could be the real Frankenstein."

So Sam and Robert decide to spy on their strange, scowling neighbor, Mr. Frank. First they list the evidence they already have:

Mr. Frank is pale and thin.

Moans and groans have been heard coming from his apartment.

It's not much to go on.

Then, one night, the lights in the whole building go out. Will Sam and Robert finally learn the spooky truth?

About the Author
Elizabeth Levy loves to tell stories that combine serious issues with humor. She has proven it with her award-winning books for young readers, including My Life As A Fifth-Grade Comedian, Keep Ms. Sugarman In The Fourth Grade, and other best-selling books in the Sam and...



Mountains of Tibet
Mordicai Gerstein
0064432114
September 1989
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
A tenderly told story about an old woodcutter and his choices when he faces the chance to live life over again. Ages 7-up. Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
Grade 2 Up This story of the death and reincarnation of a Tibetan woodcutter is a beautifully gentle look at one human being dealing with life's choices and possibilities. As a boy, he thought about other worlds that he would someday visit; as a man, he thought of other countries and people, yet ``he was always busy with his work and his wife and children.'' After his death, he is given the option of being part of ``the endless universe some call heaven'' or living another life, and he chooses another life. The choices which follow take him through all the galaxies, stars,...


The Old Country
Mordicai Gerstein
1596430478
May 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 3-6–Framed as an elderly immigrant's story, this overly ambitious tale transpires in a war-torn Balkanesque country in which various factions fight for possession of the land while everyone wishes to oust the Crags. When her brother is conscripted and goes off to war, young Gisella is left to hunt for and kill a chicken-stealing fox that has terrorized her family. However, a trial is held among the forest animals and the fox is exonerated for her "crimes." In spite of her lifelong warnings, Gisella looks too long into its eyes and she and the fox trade shapes. War separates the humans from the now fox-girl and her animal companions, but they arereunited in prison. A shape-shifting woodland sprite and an enigmatic "owl person" appear to explain the human ravages on the magical world at a...


The Absolutely Awful Alphabet
Mordicai Gerstein
0152014942
Mar 1999
Hardcover
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Book Review
Suppose each letter in the alphabet were some ghoulish creep. ("A is an awfully arrogant Amphibian...") And suppose each ensuing letter, nastier than the last, was about to attack, or get attacked by, one of its neighbors. ("P, a particularly putrid Predator ... plans to pulverize Q, a quivering, quizzical Quacker...") You'd have the delightfully spooky and suspenseful version of the alphabet that is Mordicai Gerstein's The Absolutely Awful Alphabet. Alphabet lessons have never been so slimy, ugly, nasty, or just plain weird, and Gerstein's illustrations strike just the right tone. With their blue tongues, frizzy black nose hairs, pointy fangs, and slit eyes, these letters are wonderfully terrible to behold. The best of the worst? V, a "voracious vegetable vampire who is viciously vile."...


Three Samurai Cats: A Story from Japan
Retold by Eric A. Kimmel
0823418774
September 2004
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
Kindergarten-Grade 3-Here's an adaptation of an adaptation of a story Zen masters used to illustrate how unconventional approaches to problems can be disarmingly effective. When a daimyo's castle is besieged by an enormous, ferocious rat, the lord beseeches the abbot of a nearby monastery to send a samurai cat to drive the beast away. The first and second samurai to confront him are overwhelmed by the rodent's martial-arts skills, but the third, a tattered, disreputable-looking old feline, allows the rat's greed to work against him and emerges triumphant. Kimmel's telling is reasonably successful and the message to "Draw strength from stillness. Learn to act without acting. And never underestimate a samurai cat-" is conveyed without any element of preachiness. Gerstein's lively cartoon illustrations are at...


Absolutely Awful Alphabet
Mordicai Gerstein
0152163433
October 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Suppose each letter in the alphabet were some ghoulish creep. ("A is an awfully arrogant Amphibian...") And suppose each ensuing letter, nastier than the last, was about to attack, or get attacked by, one of its neighbors. ("P, a particularly putrid Predator ... plans to pulverize Q, a quivering, quizzical Quacker...") You'd have the delightfully spooky and suspenseful version of the alphabet that is Mordicai Gerstein's The Absolutely Awful Alphabet. Alphabet lessons have never been so slimy, ugly, nasty, or just plain weird, and Gerstein's illustrations strike just the right tone. With their blue tongues, frizzy black nose hairs, pointy fangs, and slit eyes, these letters are wonderfully terrible to behold. The best of the worst? V, a "voracious vegetable vampire who is viciously vile."...


Principal's on the Roof
Elizabeth Levy
0689846274
October 2002
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 2-4-Here, basset hound Fletcher and his flea sidekick Jasper solve a new case. Fletcher's 10-year-old owner, Jill, and her friend Gwen are enthusiastic about the upcoming reading marathon. Their principal, Mr. Leonard, has promised to read aloud on the school's roof when students have read 1000 books, and he agrees to read Gwen's story, "The Mystery on the Roof." But when he starts sneezing uncontrollably and cannot read, Gwen is suspected of foul play. The animal detectives save the day when Fletcher correctly suspects that Alice, a cat jealous of her family's new baby, is on the roof and that the principal is allergic to felines. Fletcher's narration includes many humorous observations about human behavior. The comic line drawings and decorative typeface (indicating Alice "singing the blues") hit the...


The Old Country
Mordicai Gerstein
030724542X
May 2005
Audio Compact Disc - Unabridged
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 3-6–Framed as an elderly immigrant's story, this overly ambitious tale transpires in a war-torn Balkanesque country in which various factions fight for possession of the land while everyone wishes to oust the Crags. When her brother is conscripted and goes off to war, young Gisella is left to hunt for and kill a chicken-stealing fox that has terrorized her family. However, a trial is held among the forest animals and the fox is exonerated for her "crimes." In spite of her lifelong warnings, Gisella looks too long into its eyes and she and the fox trade shapes. War separates the humans from the now fox-girl and her animal companions, but they arereunited in prison. A shape-shifting woodland sprite and an enigmatic "owl person" appear to explain the human ravages on the magical world at a...


Fox Eyes
Mordicai Gerstein
0307265099
Apr 2005
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 3-5-In the first book, Martin is spending the summer with his Great Aunt Zavella, who has warned him never to stare into a fox's eyes. However, he is tempted and finds himself in the fox's body for a day. Using a magical-realism style, Gerstein is successful in leading readers to suspend belief that the child and animal could change places. Yet this is a complicated concept for new readers. Rich and Famous is a sequel to Welcome to Starvation Lake (Golden, 2000). Here, the fourth graders are having a contest to see who can raise the most money to pay for a class trip to ecology camp. The plot is filled with action, exaggerated humor, and clever twists. Both books consist of text with simple sentence construction peppered with a few complex sentences. Even though these transitional chapter...


Dracula Is a Pain in the Neck
Elizabeth Levy
0064401464
October 1984
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Is Dracula haunting Camp Hunter Creek?

Kids started calling Robert a vampire because he brought his Dracula doll to camp. Now Robert is afraid their teasing made the real Dracula angry. Weird things have been happening. Unearthly howling noises have been heard after sundown. Even the counselors are getting spooked.

Then one night Robert and his older brother, Sam, see something that chills their very bones....

Is the most famous vampire of them all really haunting Camp Hunter Creek? And if he is, will Robert be his next victim?

Card catalog description
Robert fears that his plastic Dracula doll is responsible for spooky doings at his sleep-away camp. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all...



Fox Eyes
Mordicai Gerstein
0307465098
Apr 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 3-5-In the first book, Martin is spending the summer with his Great Aunt Zavella, who has warned him never to stare into a fox's eyes. However, he is tempted and finds himself in the fox's body for a day. Using a magical-realism style, Gerstein is successful in leading readers to suspend belief that the child and animal could change places. Yet this is a complicated concept for new readers. Rich and Famous is a sequel to Welcome to Starvation Lake (Golden, 2000). Here, the fourth graders are having a contest to see who can raise the most money to pay for a class trip to ecology camp. The plot is filled with action, exaggerated humor, and clever twists. Both books consist of text with simple sentence construction peppered with a few complex sentences. Even though these transitional chapter...


A Hare-Raising Tale
Elizabeth Levy
0689846266
May 2002
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 2-4-Jill and Gwen from the popular "Something Queer" series (Hyperion) now appear in a beginning chapter book. The story centers around Jill's dog, Fletcher, who tells the story. There are many things that set him apart from your average basset hound: his best friend is a flea named Jasper and the color pattern of his fur looks like a map of the world. When the girls decide to take Fletcher to school for their geography lesson, he is blamed when the class's pet rabbit is suddenly missing. If he can't prove his innocence, it's back to the pound. Once again, Levy weaves a mystery that will capture chapter-book audiences. Full-page, black-and-white cartoons plus spot art capture the classroom antics and the pup's antics and dilemma.Hannah Hoppe, Miles City Public Library, MTCopyright 2003 Reed Business...

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