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Alfred Hitchcock: Interviews
Sidney Gottlieb (Editor)
1578065623
May 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Booklist
Arguably the most famous of all film directors, Hitchcock was very likely also the most interviewed; his career total is probably more than 1,000 interviews. That means that many of the 20 Gottlieb has collected will sound familiar to film buffs but also that Gottlieb had a wealth of material from which to choose. He has picked some gems, from throughout the five decades of Hitchcock's career, covering his output from early talkies in England to the 1970s, when the colloquies assume a retrospective tone. Perhaps the most valuable and revealing of them is an unusually technical 1948 question-and-answer session with a gathering of professional cinema technicians. Other standouts: a confrontation with provocative Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci and an encounter with Andy Warhol that makes up in novelty what it lacks in...


Alfred Hitchcock
Patrick McGilligan
0060988274
Oct 2004
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Director Hitchcock is in a class by himself. His legendary films, including Rear Window, The 39 Steps and Notorious, coupled with his TV show, Alfred Hitchock Presents, aired his singular brand of evil and salvation. In this enthralling, scholarly and candid appraisal of the artist, McGilligan, a biographer of James Cagney and Jack Nicholson, neatly reveals the man behind the camera. A quiet Catholic boy from London's East End, Hitchcock (1899- 1980) began as a production designer on silent films and eventually became Britain's premier movie director. David Selznick tapped him for Hollywood, and although their relationship was stormy, it spelled success. Hitchcock, who claimed, "I'm not interested in logic, I'm interested in effect," quickly redefined the medium. He told his stories visually, invented innovative...


Hitchcock's America
Jonathan Freedman
0195119061
Jan 1999
Paperback
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From Library Journal
In this 100th-anniversary year of Alfred Hitchcock's birth, the director's work has inspired several movie remakes and a whole new crop of admirers. These two tributes to Hitchcock's art offer something new to fans. Hitchcock's America focuses on Hitchcock as cultural critic, with essays from film and literature scholars. The pieces are randomly arranged and comment on family values, gender roles, and American ideals as they are reflected in a wide array of Hitchcock's American films. While most followers hail the psychological power of his cinema, this anthology successfully shows his ability to record the changing expectations of American society in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. The stark contrasts between big city and small town, sexuality and purity, hidden desires and social mores are explored as Hitchcock...


Alfred Hitchcock
Gene Adair
0195119673
Jan 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 7-10-This concise biography looks at Hitchcock's early life as well as his legendary career, which spanned five decades and produced some of the most famous and critically acclaimed movies made. The book begins with the filmmaker's childhood in London's working-class East End and goes on to discuss his apprenticeship during the silent-film era; early directorial efforts; transition from English film to American; fame as a visionary, artistic filmmaker; and amiable personality. Adair examines significant relationships in his subject's life, as well as career trademarks such as his use of doubles and his tendency to combine suspense with humor. These trademarks are discussed in connection with movies such as Strangers on a Train, Vertigo, and North by Northwest, creating an overview of Hitchcock's films...


Hitchcock
Fran¿ois Truffaut
0671604295
September 1985
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Any book-length interview with Alfred Hitchcock is valuable, but considering that this volume's interlocutor is François Truffaut, the conversation is remarkable indeed. Here is a rare opportunity to eavesdrop on two cinematic masters from very different backgrounds as they cover each of Hitch's films in succession. Though this book was initially published in 1967 when Hitchcock was still active, Truffaut later prepared a revised edition that covered the final stages of his career. It's difficult to think of a more informative or entertaining introduction to Hitchcock's art, interests, and peculiar sense of humor. The book is a storehouse of insight and witticism, including the master's impressions of a classic like Rear Window ("I was feeling very creative at the time, the batteries were well charged"), his...


Hitchcock's Films Revisited
Robin Wood
0231126956
May 2002
(Paperback) - Revised Ed.
·
 
Book Review
This is really two books in one. It contains the entire text of Robin Wood's groundbreaking Hitchcock's Films and supplements it with articles and commentaries on Hitchcock that Wood wrote from the time of that book's publication until today. Tracing the trajectory of Hitchcock's career, Hitchcock's Films Revisited also allows us to follow the intellectual and emotional development of one of the cinema's major critics. Wood's close readings are always revelatory and exciting, and this volume contains probably the best single essay ever written on a Hitchcock movie, Wood's analysis of Vertigo. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
In 1965, Wood, now professor of film studies at York University, authored...


Footsteps in the Fog: Alfred Hitchcock's San Francisco
Jeff Kraft
1891661272
October 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Hitchcock fans Jeff Kraft and Aaron Leventhal have assembled a meticulously researched work describing the trail the suspense master blazed through the greater San Francisco Bay area in many of his films. Footsteps in the Fog: Alfred Hitchcock's San Francisco is packed with pictures from both the filming time and now, and takes readers on a detailed journey through each step of filming for movies staged in San Francisco or elsewhere in Northern California (The Birds, for example, was filmed in Bodega Bay). The authors present the sites as they were for each scene and then describe those sites as they are today, if they still stand. For instance, the historic Mission Dolores Church, where a detective follows a troubled wife to a graveside in Vertigo, still lies at the heart of the city's Mission District. This...


Three Philosophical Filmmakers
Irving Singer
0262195011
May 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Although Alfred Hitchcock, Orson Welles, and Jean Renoir do not pontificate about "eternal verities or analytical niceties," as Irving Singer remarks in Three Philosophical Filmmakers, each expresses, through his work, his particular vision of reality. In this study of these great directors, Singer examines the ways in which meaning and technique interact within their different visions.

Singer's account reveals Hitchcock, Welles, and Renoir to be not only consummate artists and inspired craftsmen but also sophisticated theorists of film and its place in human experience. They left behind numerous essays, articles, and interviews in which they discuss the nature of their own work as well as more extensive issues. Singer draws on their writings, as well as their movies, to show the pervasive importance of...


The Hanging Figure
Christopher D. Morris
0275971368
July 2002
Hardcover
·
 
Review
“This volume will make a good supplemental reference for those looking for alternative ways to interpret not only Hitchcock's films, but also other suspense films that use the same iconography. Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty.”–Choice
“One of the great values of Morris's study of Hitchcock's work-- a study whose theoretical sympathies are unapologetically in the camp of deconstruction--is that it reinstates the centrality of suspense to Hitchcock's entire oeuvre....Morris's readings of Hitchcock are extremely important in showing us the deep affinity between Hitchcock and deconstruction. For many, this will be unsettling: deconstruction is often thought of as dangerously nihilistic or amoral-- one might say "devious" and "sinister." But I choose these last two adjectives...


It's Only a Movie: Alfred Hitchcock: A Personal Biography
Charlotte Chandler
0743245083
March 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
As almost all of his actors and collaborators note in this well-reported biography, Hitchcock (1899–1980) was never particularly forthcoming on the subject of himself. Through canvassing a broad swath of now-deceased major stars (Grace Kelly, Janet Leigh, Cary Grant), Hitchcock's longtime technicians, his daughter, wife and the filmmaker himself, veteran Hollywood writer Chandler (Nobody's Perfect: Billy Wilder; etc.) quotes several insights into Hitchcock's technical genius, creative worldview and personality. Hitchcock meticulously planned each shot before filming began, but as his daughter recalls, "at home he said he was happy if he got 75 percent of what he'd seen in his head." Hitchcock's wife, Alma, emerges as the revered ultimate authority in her husband's life and creativity, managing and smoothing...


Honeymoon
James Patterson
0446696269
January 2006
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
To be published on Valentine's Day, this solid and enjoyable but not exceptional thriller about a Black Widow killer has been selected by Bookspan as the "2005 International Thriller of the Year." That's obviously jumping the gun, and probably has more to do with the unusual sales gambit by which Bookspan was allowed to sell the book prior to bookstore distribution than with the novel's quality. Still, megaseller Patterson, here writing for the first time with Roughan (The Up and Comer), again shows his usual flair for brisk narrative, strong suspense and genuine twists in tracing the story of how FBI agent John O'Hara tracks down serial killer Nora Sinclair. As the novel opens, beautiful Nora, an interior designer for the very rich, and already wealthy after having killed her first husband for his inheritance,...


Dark Side of Genius
Donald Spoto
030680932X
Aug 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
How is it possible to paint a portrait of an artist who left behind none of the notebooks and journals that provide most biographers with important personal details? After exhaustive researching and interviewing, Donald Spoto came to the conclusion that "Hitchcock's films were indeed his notebooks and journals ... [they] are astonishingly personal documents." This account of Alfred Hitchcock's life reads the mind of the man through the making of his films. Spoto argues powerfully and convincingly that movies like Notorious, Rear Window, Vertigo and Psycho can be appreciated not only as masterpieces of entertainment but also as subtle, revealing autobiography.

From Library Journal
Spoto's 1983 biography is being reproduced in honor of the famous director's...


Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho
Stephen Rebello
0312207859
Dec 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
If you don't believe us when we say that Stephen Rebello's Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho is a killer book concerning the killer movie of all time, then why don't you listen to Tony Perkins, the star? Perkins called this scholarly yet super-readable volume "marvelously researched and irresistible ... required reading not only for Psycho-philes, but also for anyone interested in the backstage world of movie creation." And Time critic Richard Schickel (biographer of Clint Eastwood) calls Rebello's book "one of the best accounts of the making of an individual movie we've ever had."

It's even more reliable than Francois Truffaut's magisterial interview book Hitchcock, because Rebello interviewed the fat master himself, plus many Psycho insiders less cagey and truth-dodging than he.

At...



Good Boy, Fergus!
David Shannon
0439490278
March 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
PreSchool-Grade 2–Reading this story is like having a romp with the funniest dog in town. As the book opens, two lines of text (Good morning, Fergus!/Want to go out?) frame the irrepressible face of a furry white terrier, black button eyes glistening with excitement. Subsequent pages feature the pups adventures chasing cats and motorbikes, scratching and being scratched, playing in the dirt, begging for meatballs, and riding in the car. No matter what the animal does, his masters refrain is…you guessed it. Readers see everything from a terrier-sized perspective, and they rarely see anyone but Fergus. When he is trampling his owner to request a walk, they catch just a glimpse of a human face. The motorcyclists face is so covered with gear as to be generic. The more intimate portraits here are of...


Hitchcock's Notebooks
Dan Auiler
0380799456
Apr 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Dan Auiler is undoubtedly the luckiest Alfred Hitchcock devotee alive. With the permission of the director's family, he sifted through the Hitchcock archives at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to create a multifaceted portrait of the artist at work. If this book has a fault, it's that the sheer mass of information makes it a little hard to digest; but taken in small doses, its richness becomes a virtue, offering unique insights into the complicated processes that led to some of the greatest movies ever made.

Auiler divides the creative act into three parts: "Building the Screenplay," "Preparing the Visual," and "Putting It All Together." In each section he provides documents, including memos, script excerpts, sketches, and storyboards from a selection of films. Most interesting are those relating to...



Honeymoon
James Patterson
0316710628
February 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
To be published on Valentine's Day, this solid and enjoyable but not exceptional thriller about a Black Widow killer has been selected by Bookspan as the "2005 International Thriller of the Year." That's obviously jumping the gun, and probably has more to do with the unusual sales gambit by which Bookspan was allowed to sell the book prior to bookstore distribution than with the novel's quality. Still, megaseller Patterson, here writing for the first time with Roughan (The Up and Comer), again shows his usual flair for brisk narrative, strong suspense and genuine twists in tracing the story of how FBI agent John O'Hara tracks down serial killer Nora Sinclair. As the novel opens, beautiful Nora, an interior designer for the very rich, and already wealthy after having killed her first husband for his inheritance,...


The Birds
Camille Paglia
0851706517
September 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
BFI Film Classics are a treasure, featuring some of the most imaginative recent writing on movies and the film industry. In each little book of the series, an important essayist explores the planning, production, and meaning of a single classic film. We've already been treated to Laura Mulvey on Citizen Kane, David Thomson on The Big Sleep, and Salman Rushdie on The Wizard of Oz. Camille Paglia on The Birds seems like the next, natural step!

Paglia brings her characteristic blend of autobiography, psychoanalysis, kinky vampirism, 1960s radicalism, and contempt for scholarly jargon to her discussion of The Birds, Hitchcock's vision of Mother Nature's vengeance on the humans who have desecrated her. Paglia says she has loved the movie since it first flew into theaters in 1963: "Overwhelmed by the film when I saw it as an...



The Art of Alfred Hitchcock
Donald Spoto
0385418132
Dec 1991
Paperback
·
 
Review
"Combines thoughtful and engaging analysis and wit and scholarship."--Chicago Sun-Times

Review
"Combines thoughtful and engaging analysis and wit and scholarship."--Chicago Sun-Times

See all Editorial Reviews

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