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Haunting of Hill House
Shirley Jackson
0140071083
May 1984
Paperback
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Book Review
Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House has unnerved readers since its original publication in 1959. A tale of subtle, psychological terror, it has earned its place as one of the significant haunted house stories of the ages.

Eleanor Vance has always been a loner--shy, vulnerable, and bitterly resentful of the 11 years she lost while nursing her dying mother. "She had spent so long alone, with no one to love, that it was difficult for her to talk, even casually, to another person without self-consciousness and an awkward inability to find words." Eleanor has always sensed that one day something big would happen, and one day it does. She receives an unusual invitation from Dr. John Montague, a man fascinated by "supernatural manifestations." He organizes a ghost watch, inviting people who have been...



The Lottery: And Other Stories
Shirley Jackson
0374529531
March 2005
Paperback
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Review
"The stories remind one of the elemental terrors of childhood."--James Hilton, Herald Tribune

"In her art, as in her life, Shirley Jackson was an absolute original. She listened to her own voice, kept her own counsel, isolated herself from all intellectual and literary currents . . . . She was unique."--Newsweek


Shirley Jackson
Harold Bloom (Editor)
0791059480
March 2001
Hardcover
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Book Description
Examine some of Shirley Jackson's most well-known work along with Bloom's assertion that she may, in fact, not be worthy of the canon. Studied in the text is her most widely read work "The Lottery," plus "Charles" and The Haunting of Hill House. This title also features a biography of Shirley Jackson, a user guide, a detailed thematic analysis of each short story, a list of characters in each story, a complete bibliography of Jackson’s works, an index of themes and ideas, and editor’s notes and introduction by Harold Bloom. This series, Bloom’s Major Short Story Writers, is edited by Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of the Humanities, Yale University; Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Professor of English, New York University Graduate School; preeminent literary critic of our time. The world’s most...


Shirley Jackson
Joan Wylie Hall
0805708537
February 1993
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Series Editors: Gary Scharnhorst, University of New Mexico and Eric Haralson, State University of New York, Stony Brook

This is the only series to provide in-depth critical introductions to major modern and contemporary short story writers worldwide. Each volume offers: A comprehensive overview of the artist's short fiction-including detailed analyses of every significant story Interviews, essays, memoirs and other biographical materials -- often previously unpublished A representative selection of critical responses Acomprehensive primary bibliography, a selected bibliography of important criticism, a chronology of the artist's life and works and an index



Come Along with Me
Shirley Jackson
0140250379
Oct 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
If you were thrilled by Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" but aren't familiar with her other stories, don't miss the chance to pick up this important collection edited by the author's husband. In addition to "The Lottery," it includes classics like "The Beautiful Stranger" (body snatcher theme with a twist), "The Summer People" (a tale of sinister villagers), "A Visit" (a lyrical ghost story), "The Rock" (where death is a short, shy gentleman), and "The Bus" (Jackson's most overtly ghoulish and frightening story of all). The unfinished novel Come Along with Me is mesmerizing, and Jackson's "Biography of a Story" is an utterly hilarious account of readers' reactions when "The Lottery" was first published in the New Yorker in...


A Moment on the Edge: 100 Years of Crime Stories by Women
Elizabeth George (Editor)
0641661215

Hardcover
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Cat under Fire: A Joe Grey Mystery
Shirley Rousseau Murphy
0061056014
January 1997
Mass Market Paperback
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From Booklist
Crusty Joe Grey, the feline hero of Cat on the Edge (1996), and his spirited love, Dulcie, return to investigate another murder, and this time, it's not their lives that are threatened; it's just that Dulcie thinks the young man arrested for the murder of a local artist is innocent. Once again, it's not really clear just how Joe and Dulcie acquired their ability to think and talk like human beings; however, the clever dialogue, fast-paced action, humor, and interactions between cats and humans make it worth the reader's effort to suspend disbelief. Good fun for cat lovers and fans of offbeat fantasy. Sally Estes

Book Description

A big, powerful, gray feline, Joe Grey is perfectly content with his remarkable ability to understand and communicate with humans --...



The Haunting
Shirley Jackson
0140287434
July 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House has unnerved readers since its original publication in 1959. A tale of subtle, psychological terror, it has earned its place as one of the significant haunted house stories of the ages.

Eleanor Vance has always been a loner--shy, vulnerable, and bitterly resentful of the 11 years she lost while nursing her dying mother. "She had spent so long alone, with no one to love, that it was difficult for her to talk, even casually, to another person without self-consciousness and an awkward inability to find words." Eleanor has always sensed that one day something big would happen, and one day it does. She receives an unusual invitation from Dr. John Montague, a man fascinated by "supernatural manifestations." He organizes a ghost watch, inviting people who have been...



Life among the Savages
Shirley Jackson
0140267670
October 1997
Paperback
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Book Review
Can this be the author of such chilling tales as The Lottery and The Haunting of Hill House? An ordinary housewife stuck in a big, shabby house with three marvelous, demanding children and a charming husband who takes detached interest in the chaos they generate? Yes, it's Shirley Jackson all right: the precision of her observations and prose is familiar, even if her humor is something of a surprise. Not until Anne Lamott's Operating Instructions in 1993 would another woman write with such honesty about the maddening multitude of trivial, essential chores that constitute a mother's life. But Jackson nailed it first, 40 years earlier, in her hilarious chronicle of life in a small Vermont town, where getting the kids to school on time requires the combined gifts of a drill sergeant and a lady's maid. The saga of her son's...


We Have Always Lived in the Castle
Shirley Jackson
0143039970
Nov 2006
Paperback
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Book Review
Visitors call seldom at Blackwood House. Taking tea at the scene of a multiple poisoning, with a suspected murderess as one's host, is a perilous business. For a start, the talk tends to turn to arsenic. "It happened in this very room, and we still have our dinner in here every night," explains Uncle Julian, continually rehearsing the details of the fatal family meal. "My sister made these this morning," says Merricat, politely proffering a plate of rum cakes, fresh from the poisoner's kitchen. We Have Always Lived in the Castle, Shirley Jackson's 1962 novel, is full of a macabre and sinister humor, and Merricat herself, its amiable narrator, is one of the great unhinged heroines of literature. "What place would be better for us than this?" she asks, of the neat, secluded realm she shares with her uncle and with her beloved...


Shirley Jackson's American Gothic
Darryl Hattenhauer
0791456080
January 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
Argues that Jackson anticipated the transition from modernism to postmodernism and should be ranked among the most significant writers of her time. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From the Back Cover
"Best known for her short story "The Lottery" and her novel The Haunting of Hill House, Shirley Jackson produced a body of work that is more varied and complex than critics have realized. In fact, as Darryl Hattenhauer argues here, Jackson was one of the few writers to anticipate the transition from modernism to postmodernism, and therefore ranks among the most significant writers of her time. The first comprehensive study of all of Jackson's fiction, Shirley Jackson's American Gothic offers readers the chance not only to rediscover her work, but also to...


We Have Always Lived in the Castle
Shirley Jackson
0140071075
May 1984
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Visitors call seldom at Blackwood House. Taking tea at the scene of a multiple poisoning, with a suspected murderess as one's host, is a perilous business. For a start, the talk tends to turn to arsenic. "It happened in this very room, and we still have our dinner in here every night," explains Uncle Julian, continually rehearsing the details of the fatal family meal. "My sister made these this morning," says Merricat, politely proffering a plate of rum cakes, fresh from the poisoner's kitchen. We Have Always Lived in the Castle, Shirley Jackson's 1962 novel, is full of a macabre and sinister humor, and Merricat herself, its amiable narrator, is one of the great unhinged heroines of literature. "What place would be better for us than this?" she asks, of the neat, secluded realm she shares with her uncle and with her beloved...


The Haunting of Hill House
Shirley Jackson
0143039989
Nov 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House has unnerved readers since its original publication in 1959. A tale of subtle, psychological terror, it has earned its place as one of the significant haunted house stories of the ages.

Eleanor Vance has always been a loner--shy, vulnerable, and bitterly resentful of the 11 years she lost while nursing her dying mother. "She had spent so long alone, with no one to love, that it was difficult for her to talk, even casually, to another person without self-consciousness and an awkward inability to find words." Eleanor has always sensed that one day something big would happen, and one day it does. She receives an unusual invitation from Dr. John Montague, a man fascinated by "supernatural manifestations." He organizes a ghost watch, inviting people who have been...



Something from the Oven: Reinventing Dinner in 1950's America
Laura Shapiro
014303491X
April 2005
Paperback
·
 
From The New Yorker
In the fifties, we're always told, the food industry barged into the American kitchen, waving TV dinners, and destroyed home cooking. Not so fast, Shapiro says. As she reveals, women refused many of the new convenience foods. Fish sticks they accepted, but not ham sticks. Canned peaches, yes; canned hamburgers, no. The industry people hired psychologists to help them combat such resistance; the women's magazines, fond of their advertisers, told readers how, by splashing some sherry over the frozen peas, they could still make dinner look as though they had cooked it. The book is very funny, and also subtle. The most interesting character is Poppy Cannon, the foremost food columnist of the period, who, though she started her mint-jelly recipe with lime jello, was a serious feminist and had a long affair...


Strong Force
Diane Oconnell
0309095530
Apr 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
Shirley Ann Jackson sees the unseen. She’s an expert in the invisible particles that make up everything in the universe, including you. Shirley is a theoretical physicist, a scientist who studies the subatomic world using only paper, pencils, computers, and the most important tool of all: her imagination. Shirley’s passion for science blossomed during her childhood, with bumblebee experiments and go-cart races. But it’s her talent for math and her drive to succeed that have taken her career in amazing directions. Shirley uses her knowledge of electrons, neutrinos, and other particles of matter to better the lives of others—from solving important technology problems to teaching college physics to making nuclear power plants safer. A natural-born leader, Shirley has always seized opportunities and...

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