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My Great-Aunt Arizona
Gloria Houston
0064433749
April 1997
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The author of The Year of the Perfect Christmas Tree and Littlejim again demonstrates her skill as a graceful, affecting storyteller. In spare yet stirring prose, she recounts the life of her great-aunt Arizona, who "was born in a log cabin her papa built . . . in the Blue Ridge Mountains." Arizona and her younger brother attended a one-room school, helped tap the maple trees in spring and "caught tadpoles in the creek." Later, she went away to school, and returned to teach in the same schoolhouse where she herself learned. For 57 years, Arizona hugged her students, and "taught them words and numbers, and about the faraway places they would visit someday." Lamb's bustling paintings--with glowing characters straight out of Laura Ingalls Wilder--convey the timeless beauty of the region, as well as Arizona's warmth...


My Great-Aunt Arizona
Gloria Houston
0060226064
January 1992
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The author of The Year of the Perfect Christmas Tree and Littlejim again demonstrates her skill as a graceful, affecting storyteller. In spare yet stirring prose, she recounts the life of her great-aunt Arizona, who "was born in a log cabin her papa built . . . in the Blue Ridge Mountains." Arizona and her younger brother attended a one-room school, helped tap the maple trees in spring and "caught tadpoles in the creek." Later, she went away to school, and returned to teach in the same schoolhouse where she herself learned. For 57 years, Arizona hugged her students, and "taught them words and numbers, and about the faraway places they would visit someday." Lamb's bustling paintings--with glowing characters straight out of Laura Ingalls Wilder--convey the timeless beauty of the region, as well as Arizona's warmth...


Tales from a Gas-Lit Graveyard
Hugh Lamb (Editor)
048643429X
June 2004
Paperback
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The Immortal Dinner: A Famous Evening of Genius and Laughter in Literary London, 1817
Penelope Hughes-Hallett
1561310719
September 2002
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
A single dinner, attended 185 years ago by such literary luminaries as William Wordsworth, John Keats and Charles Lamb, no matter how brilliant the conversation, may not seem a sufficient subject for a book of 300 pages but it is in Hughes-Hallett's hands. The host to the evening, painter B.R. Haydon, had an agenda in putting together the dinner: he wanted to show off his progress on the monumental painting Christ's Entry into Jerusalem. Hughes-Hallet's (Home at Grasmere: The Wordsworths and the Lakes) main source for what transpired is Haydon's diary, which put a grandiose, self-congratulatory spin on the evening. The author takes Haydon's hyperbolic lead, portraying the dinner as a pivotal cultural event of the early 19th century. Far more interesting than the dinner itself, though, is...


Darkness Rising
L. H. Maynard
1587154064
Jan 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
A collection of sci-fi horror stories from Howard Jones, Kurt Newton, and others.


My Great-Aunt Arizona
Gloria Houston
0060226072
January 1992
Library Binding
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From Publishers Weekly
The author of The Year of the Perfect Christmas Tree and Littlejim again demonstrates her skill as a graceful, affecting storyteller. In spare yet stirring prose, she recounts the life of her great-aunt Arizona, who "was born in a log cabin her papa built . . . in the Blue Ridge Mountains." Arizona and her younger brother attended a one-room school, helped tap the maple trees in spring and "caught tadpoles in the creek." Later, she went away to school, and returned to teach in the same schoolhouse where she herself learned. For 57 years, Arizona hugged her students, and "taught them words and numbers, and about the faraway places they would visit someday." Lamb's bustling paintings--with glowing characters straight out of Laura Ingalls Wilder--convey the timeless beauty of the region, as well as Arizona's warmth...


The Black Reaper
Bernard Capes
1899562524
Aug 1998
Hardcover
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A Bottomless Grave
Hugh Lamb (Editor)
0486415902
February 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
Selected from the works of American, British, and French writers, 21 rare and seldom-anthologized stories include "A Bottomless Grave," by Ambrose Bierce; "The Ship that Saw a Ghost," by Frank Norris; Guy de Maupassant’s "The Tomb"; Richard Marsh’s "The Haunted Chair"; and other hard-to-find gems of the genre.


Gaslit Nightmares: Stories by Robert W. Chambers, Charles Dickens, Richard Marsh, and Others
Hugh Lamb (Editor)
0486449246
August 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
Bloodcurdling tales from beyond the grave--teeming with sinister figures, grisly cargoes, and the undead--fill the pages of this chilling anthology. Sixteen long-neglected classics by renowned writers include "The Drunkard's Path," "An Unexpected Journey," "The Haunted Mill," "The Page-Boy's Ghost," "In the Court of the Dragon," and eleven others.


The Great Ribs Book
Hugh Carpenter
1580080715
May 1999
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Berry is known as the "Bean Queen"Aalthough she grows other things at her northern New Mexican ranch, it's her heirloom beans that have made her famous in culinary circles. She started out growing specialty produce for Coyote Caf?, Mark Miller's well-known Santa Fe restaurant, but now the focus of the ranch is what New York Times food writer Fabricant refers to as Berry's "library"Athe 300 or so different bean plants she grows each season and what could be called the reference section, jars of dried beans from adzuki to white emergo. The authors cover just 30 of these beans in their book, providing description, background, cooking information, and (usually) one recipeAoften from a chef who cooks Berry's beansAfor each type. A nice book, but considering Berry's knowledge of unusual beans, disappointing in its...


Crispus Attucks
Arthur J. Hughes
096782866X
October 2002
Paperback
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Treasons of the Heart
Charlotte Lamb
0340712848

Hardcover
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About the Author
Sheila Holland, known by her pen name Charlotte Lamb, was born just before the beginning of World War II in the East End of London. She left school at 16, and got a job at the Bank of England as a clerk. Lamb continued to teach herself by taking advantage of the bank's library during her lunch breaks and after work. She later worked as a secretary for the British Broadcasting Corporation. Lamb began writing at her husband's suggestion. She wrote her first book in three days and in between raising five children wrote several more novels. She used both her married and maiden names, among other pseudonyms, before her first novel as Charlotte Lamb, Follow a Stranger, was published by Harlequin Mills & Boon in 1973. Lamb wrote more than 160 novels, typically writing a minimum of 2,000 words per day, working from 9 a.m....

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