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Speak What We Feel: Not What We Ought to Say: foour Who Wrote in Blook: G.K. Chesterton, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Mark Twain, William Shakespeare
Frederick Buechner
0062517538
August 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
Great literature is like a spiritual informant, helping readers derive meaning out of the best of times and the worst of times. In Speak What We Feel, novelist and preacher Frederick Buechner pays homage to the worst of times, examining the life and writings of four esteemed writers and how they each came to terms with despair on the page. The title, Speak What We Feel, alludes to the bravery of William Shakespeare, Gerald Manley Hopkins, Mark Twain, and G.K. Chesterton--all of whom opened the veins to their hearts and let their emotions bleed upon the page. "Vein-opening writers are putting not just themselves into their books, but themselves at their nakedest and most vulnerable," writes Buechner. Not all writers do it all the time, he notes, and many writers never do it at all. "But for the four writers these pages are...


The Uttermost Mark: The Dramatic Criticism of Gerard Manley Hopkins His Dramatic Works and the Performance Thereof

0819177067
May 1990
Hardcover
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Book Description
The Uttermost Mark is the first book to assemble all that Gerard Manley Hopkins had to say about plays, playwrights and the art of playwriting, together with his own dramatic writings, with special attention given to their performance. Dramatic is a word often used in connection with Hopkins' poetry, but his name is rarely associated with the drama. Yet at the beginning and the end of his writing career he was intent on writing plays and much of his literary criticism, to be found for the most part in his letters, is dramatic criticism. Furthermore, some of the more interesting pieces of his early period are dramatic monologues and the best of the poems written during the last years of his life are dramatic lyrics. This book is the first to bring this together. The author brings the shape of Hopkins' dramatic effort...


How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs: A Step-by-Step Guide to Teach Yourself, Revised
Mark Collier
0520239490
March 2003
Hardcover
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Book Review
You need no previous experience reading hieroglyphs to benefit from this book. This is a hieroglyphs guide for the layperson, tourist, or museum enthusiast who'd like to have more of a clue when it comes to understanding Egyptian hieroglyphs. Focusing on the funerary symbols one would be likely to see in Egypt or at a museum, and illustrated with hieroglyphs that are on display in the British Museum (drawn by Richard Parkinson, curator in the Department of Egyptian Antiquities at the British Museum), How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs makes possible a deeper appreciation not just of museum displays but of the Egyptian culture that used this writing system.

Both experts in Egyptology (Collier teaches Egyptology at the University of Liverpool, and Manley teaches the subject at the University of Glasgow), they explain how...



Queen of the Negro Leagues: Effa Manley and the Newak Eagles
James Overmyer
1578860016
January 1998
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
There was no one like Effa Manley in the sports world of the 1930s and 1940s. She was a sophisticated woman who owned a baseball team. That her life story has remained unchronicled can only be attributed to one thing: her team, the Newark Eagles, belonged to the Negro Baseball League.


Self-Made Worlds: Visionary Folk Art Environments
Roger Manley
0893817325
September 1997
Hardcover
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Book Review
Carefully conceived, with respectful, sophisticated essays and excellent color photographs, plus an extensive list of folk-art sites, Self-Made Worlds may prove indispensable to aficionados of outsider art, and will be educational for those who are new to it. The sites--minutely decorated, handmade, often monumental temples, grottoes, castles, and towers--range from the famous, graceful Palais Idéal in France, to a Depression-era shack in Louisiana painted with words. Portable outsider art fetches high prices, but as curator Roger Manley writes, all of these obsessive environments, whether about beauty, rage, or sadness, "stem from a deeply felt need for experience that feels honest, authentic, and highly personal."

From Library Journal
Whether termed...


Horizons
Stuart Smith
0838413692
November 2001
Textbook Hardcover
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Book Description
HORIZONS is a flexible first-year French program whose practical applications allow students to connect their language skills to the global workplace.

Language Notes
Text: English, French --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Horizons
Joan J. Manley
0838479294
March 1998
Textbook Other Format
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Book Description
HORIZONS is a flexible first-year French program whose practical applications allow students to connect their language skills to the global workplace. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Language Notes
Text: English, French --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Horizons with CD
Joan H. Manley
1413005349
January 2005
Textbook Hardcover
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Book Description
HORIZONS makes learning French easier through its step-by-step, skill building approach to the communicative classroom. Through interactive, varied activities and clear grammar explanations, students are able to communicate effectively in French while culturally connecting themselves to the Francophone world.

Language Notes
Text: English, French --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Soft Sift
Mark Ford
015100949X
March 2003
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Though U.K. sophisticates have been Ford fans for a decade, the London-based poet's first U.S. notice came with his recent critical volume Raymond Roussel and the Republic of Dreams. He makes his American poetic debut in this slippery and smart volume of short poems. The people in Ford's poems move along misty, up-to-date paths through their cityscapes, musing on problems as recherch‚ as the nature of power, or as ordinary as the end of a romance: "Brinkmanship" imagines "moving/ Through time and air as if each mirrored the other," while the ironically titled "Twenty Twenty Vision" explains "my doom is never to forget/ My lost bearings." Some shorter poems mock the academy or explore the "ruthless, intricate currents" of travel and thought. Other poems offer warmer, less ironized pleasures: "Pinch me, pinch...

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