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King of Hearts: The True Story of the Maverick Who Pioneered Open Heart Surgery
G. Wayne Miller
0609807242
February 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
The surgeon-as-rock-star mystique seems like it must have come straight out of Hollywood, but the myth had to begin more concretely. A good candidate is Minnesota's Dr. Walt Lillehei, the hard-working, hard-playing father of open-heart surgery, whose life is told in garish color in King of Hearts by journalist G. Wayne Miller. From his early brilliance, recovery from deadly lymphatic cancer, and dramatic repair of seemingly hopeless heart cases to the disintegration of his career at its peak thanks to an army of personal enemies and conviction on tax evasion counts, his story is consistently surprising and engaging. Fast cars, hard drinking, and plenty of women filled his time when he wasn't turning lives around with a few strokes of his scalpel, and the reader will find the surgeon's actions almost unbelievable--rarely...


Men and Speed
G. Wayne Wayne Miller
1586480960
April 2002
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
As NASCAR auto racing gains more fans, it appears poised to pass baseball and football as America's most popular sport. Some of the reasons for NASCAR's astounding growth are outlined by Miller: speed and danger, close competition, and above all drivers to whom the fans can relate directly. In an age of overpaid prima donnas posing as stars in the stick-and-ball sports, NASCAR brings a down-home sensibility, a much more human element to the relationship between star and fanDperhaps because of stock-car racing's Southern roots. Miller's approach was to follow the NASCAR circuit for the entire seasonDcertainly not a new approach in itself as has been seen by a number of books reviewed in these pages. However, the result is quite readable and brings a perspective from outside the usual Southern enclave of...


Men and Speed: A Wild Rife Through NASCAR's Breakout Season
G. Wayne Miller
1586481827
May 2003
Paperback
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From Library Journal
As NASCAR auto racing gains more fans, it appears poised to pass baseball and football as America's most popular sport. Some of the reasons for NASCAR's astounding growth are outlined by Miller: speed and danger, close competition, and above all drivers to whom the fans can relate directly. In an age of overpaid prima donnas posing as stars in the stick-and-ball sports, NASCAR brings a down-home sensibility, a much more human element to the relationship between star and fanDperhaps because of stock-car racing's Southern roots. Miller's approach was to follow the NASCAR circuit for the entire seasonDcertainly not a new approach in itself as has been seen by a number of books reviewed in these pages. However, the result is quite readable and brings a perspective from outside the usual Southern enclave of...


King of Hearts
G. Wayne Miller
0786118970
Jan 2001
Audio Cassette - Unabridged
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The John Deere Legacy
Don MacMillian
0896586197
September 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Not only is "The John Deere Tractor Legacy" published under license of Deere & Company, it is edited by the world’s most respected and best known John Deere historian and expert--Don Macmillan--so readers know they can rely on its information. This comprehensive history of the man, his company, and his legacy includes a biography of John Deere, plus excerpts from the writings of Deere engineers and historians, such as Wayne Broehl, Harold Brock, and Orrin Miller. Images are from the Deere archives, as well as from noted tractor photographer Ralph W. Sanders. Readers will find never-before-published material in "The John Deere Tractor Legacy," including compelling accounts of the development of the Waterloo Boy, the Johnny Popper, and the New Generation tractors. Readers will also discover the importance of the...


The Xeno Chronicles
G. Wayne Miller
1586482424
May 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
For the 87,000 people on the waiting list for transplants in the United States alone, stem cell research leading to cloned human organs is a distant hope. Far more likely in the short run, at least according to its most passionate advocates, is xenotransplantation, or transplantation across species. Putting animal organs into humans may seem distasteful or even unethical, but in The Xeno Chronicles, G. Wayne Miller shows readers why it might be worth pursuing. The book follows the scientific trials and tribulations of Dr. David H. Sachs of the Harvard Medical School in his quest to successfully transplant into baboons the organs of a "double-knockout" pig--cloned and genetically engineered so that its DNA lacks two copies of the gene that causes its cells to be rejected by other species. Over the course of the book, Miller...


Coming of Age: The True Adventures of Two American Teens
G. Wayne Miller
0812992067
May 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Is Burrillville High School in northwest Rhode Island a microcosm of small-town kids watching the senior class edging warily toward adulthood? In 1992, Miller, a staff writer at the Providence Journal-Bulletin, began shadowing two lively teens?Dave Bettencourt, at the start of his last year in high school, and Beth, his girlfriend and a provocative sophomore. "Energy, optimism and refreshing flakiness" are the observable traits this writer-in-residence enjoys when he joins Dave in a series of adventures, some comical, some not so funny. They involve a radical underground school paper, Dave's stated goal to be named class clown, his serious dating and all the preliminaries to the serious matter of looming adulthood. Miller describes the universal experiences of adolescents growing up in a world quite different...


Notes from a Native Son: Essays on the Appalachian Experience
Garry G. Barker
0870499009
November 1995
Paperback
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Thunder Rise
G. Wayne Miller
0595197884
September 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Miller's first novel is an occasionally awkward but generally well-paced and effective thriller telling of an ancient evil threatening the lives of the children in a pleasant New England community. Journalist Brad Gale, leaving New York in the wake of an ugly divorce, moves to sylvan Morgantown, Mass., with his young daughter Abigail. But Abigail and other children in town soon develop mysterious flu-like symptoms. Medical treatment proves ineffective, and the illness appears to be fatal. Only a Quidneck Indian named Charley Moonlight claims to know the cause: a satanic spirit, Hobbamock, released when a local cave was opened, cannot be quelled until a child manages to fell it with an ancient Quidneck spear. And, Gale realizes, that child must be Abigail. Troll Book Club selection. Copyright 1989 Reed Business...

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