Book Finder
    
 
> Horror > Authors A-Z > Nasaw Jonathan
 

The Girls He Adored
Jonathan Nasaw
0671787454
Feb 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Of all the rules a serial killer might choose to ignore, the costliest may be rolling through a red light within sight of a vigilant sheriff's deputy. But in Jonathan Nasaw's latest thriller, The Girls He Adored, that's exactly what he does. As the deputy tells it: "But when I look in, I see this blond girl, couldn't have been more than eighteen, she's sitting straight up holding her stomach with both hands. She's wearing a white sweater that looks like it's dyed in overlapping bands of red at the bottom, and she has the strangest expression on her face. Just, you know, puzzled--I'll never forget that expression. I ask her if she's okay, she lifts up her sweater with both hands, and her guts spill out on her lap."

A number of strawberry blondes have disappeared over the past 11 years. If rumpled FBI Special Agent...



Fear Itself
Jonathan Nasaw
0743446526
Dec 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
E.L. Pender, the FBI agent introduced in Nasaw's previous mystery (The Girls He Adored, is a few days short of retirement when he gets a letter from a California woman with an unlikely premise--that the deaths of three people who, like her, attended a conference for people suffering from a variety of phobias (some very strange indeed) were not the random accidents they appeared to be, but the work of a serial killer. Once Pender meets Dorie Bell, the letter writer, he believes her, and with the help of a gutsy agent sidelined from an active career in the FBI by her recently diagnosed MS, he tracks the murderer--the man who bankrolled the conference in order to meet his victims, learn their vulnerabilities, and use their fears to kill them. The sociopathic villain of this suspenseful novel is a sort of junior-grade...


Twenty-Seven Bones
Jonathan Nasaw
0743446534
June 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Readers fearing that recently retired FBI Agent E.L. Pender (The Girls He Adored; Fear Itself) would devote himself to a life of leisure on a sandy beach can breathe a sigh of relief: his serial killer hunter skills are as sharp as ever. Pender does head for a tropical isle, though-the fictional St. Luke in the U.S. Virgin Islands-when old pal Julian Coffee, the chief of police, invites him to help hunt down a sadistic killer whose signature is severing the right hand of his many victims. The identity of the killer, or in this case killers, is no secret to the reader: kinky anthropologist spouses Phil and Emily Epps are shown early on murdering St. Luke resident Andy Arena after a "sadomasochistic tango." The Epps believe that sucking in a dying person's last breath will make them all-powerful, a ritual learned...


Twenty-Seven Bones
Jonathan Nasaw
0641715900

Hardcover
·
 


Twenty-Seven Bones
Jonathan Nasaw
0743446542
May 2006
Paperback
·
 
Review
"Explosive."-- San Francisco Chronicle
"Loaded with suspense."-- Library Journal
"Move over, Hannibal Lecter."-- Scottish Daily Record
"A first-rate thriller."-- Boston Globe

Book Description
The Washington Post hailed Jonathan Nasaw's debut thriller as "superior" and "frightening." The Toronto Sun called him "a legitimate heavyweight contender among the masters of the psychological thriller" with "the most original, twisted, terrifying villains known to mankind." Now, in Twenty-Seven Bones, Nasaw turns up the heat -- and the suspense -- with a pair of deranged killers who defy the very nature of life, death, and desire....There are twenty-seven bones in the human hand. And there are three dead bodies on the island of...


Twenty-Seven Bones
Jonathan Nasaw
1402581378
June 2004
Audio Compact Disc - Unabridged
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Readers fearing that recently retired FBI Agent E.L. Pender (The Girls He Adored; Fear Itself) would devote himself to a life of leisure on a sandy beach can breathe a sigh of relief: his serial killer hunter skills are as sharp as ever. Pender does head for a tropical isle, though-the fictional St. Luke in the U.S. Virgin Islands-when old pal Julian Coffee, the chief of police, invites him to help hunt down a sadistic killer whose signature is severing the right hand of his many victims. The identity of the killer, or in this case killers, is no secret to the reader: kinky anthropologist spouses Phil and Emily Epps are shown early on murdering St. Luke resident Andy Arena after a "sadomasochistic tango." The Epps believe that sucking in a dying person's last breath will make them all-powerful, a ritual learned...


Angstspiel
JONATHAN NASAW
345387756X

Paperback
·
 


Fear Itself
Jonathan Nasaw
0743446518
January 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
E.L. Pender, the FBI agent introduced in Nasaw's previous mystery (The Girls He Adored, is a few days short of retirement when he gets a letter from a California woman with an unlikely premise--that the deaths of three people who, like her, attended a conference for people suffering from a variety of phobias (some very strange indeed) were not the random accidents they appeared to be, but the work of a serial killer. Once Pender meets Dorie Bell, the letter writer, he believes her, and with the help of a gutsy agent sidelined from an active career in the FBI by her recently diagnosed MS, he tracks the murderer--the man who bankrolled the conference in order to meet his victims, learn their vulnerabilities, and use their fears to kill them. The sociopathic villain of this suspenseful novel is a sort of junior-grade...


On the Edge of Your Seat: Popular Theater and Film in Early Twentieth-Century American Art
Patricia McDonnell
0300092407
April 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
Similar in scope and execution to Donna Gustafson's recently published Images from the World Between: The Circus in 20th Century American Art, this lovely exhibition catalog of the eponymous art exhibition, curated by McDonnell of the University of Minnesota's Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, critically explores the influence of popular entertainment on American visual art from 1890 to 1930. The book is adorned with 95 color plates and 47 black-and-white illustrations, but unlike Images from the World Between, it is the text that steals the show. Among the ten essays explicating the wonder and pervasive influence of vaudeville, film, theater, and burlesque on American artists are contributions from noted academics Rebecca Zurier, Robert Silberman, and David Nashaw, who offers a particularly illuminating piece on...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.