Book Finder
    
 
> Horror > Authors A-Z > Oates Joyce Carol
 

We Were the Mulvaneys (Oprah Edition)
Joyce Carol Oates
0452282829
January 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Oprah Book Club® Selection, January 2001: A happy family, the Mulvaneys. After decades of marriage, Mom and Dad are still in love--and the proud parents of a brood of youngsters that includes a star athlete, a class valedictorian, and a popular cheerleader. Home is an idyllic place called High Point Farm. And the bonds of attachment within this all-American clan do seem both deep and unconditional: "Mom paused again, drawing in her breath sharply, her eyes suffused with a special lustre, gazing upon her family one by one, with what crazy unbounded love she gazed upon us, and at such a moment my heart would contract as if this woman who was my mother had slipped her fingers inside my rib cage to contain it, as you might hold a wild, thrashing bird to comfort it."

But as we all know, Eden can't last forever....



Billy Budd and Other Tales
Herman Melville
0451526872
July 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
3 1/2 inch diskette enclosed/IBM compatible --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Missing Mom
Joyce Carol Oates
006081621X
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Oates's latest returns to upstate New York's Mount Ephraim, the setting of We Were the Mulvaneys, Oates's 1996 novel—a 2001 Oprah pick—about one family's privilege and decay. This time, Oates turns to the middle class: narrator Nikki Eaton, 31, is a reporter for the smalltown Beacon and her family's black sheep. She's having an affair with a married DJ; she barely tolerates her widowed mother, Gwen, and her homemaker sister, Clare. As the novel opens, Nikki arrives at Gwen's Mother's Day party with newly spiked, "inky-maroon" hair and contempt for Gwen's cooking, one-story house and endless munificence to her ragtag guests. Two days later, Gwen is murdered by an ex-con. Chronicling Nikki's year following Gwen's death, the novel includes some wonderfully precise emotional observations. But more often...


Freaky Green Eyes
Joyce Carol Oates
0064473481
February 2005
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 7-10–Francesca (Franky) Pierson opens this story by Joyce Carol Oates (HarperTempest, 2003) by introducing us to the no-nonsense, competent, take-action adult persona she feels taking shape inside herself whom she calls Freaky Green Eyes. It's these eyes that see her situation clearly, although Francesca herself doesn't want to connect all the dots and let herself understand her family's awful situation. Her father is an abuser, both emotionally and physically, and Francesca and her younger sister and older half-brother all know how to tiptoe around him and keep him absolutely happy and in control. But her mother seems increasingly unwilling to keep him in balance by being completely subservient and compliant. Franky turns against her mother emotionally for rocking the boat, yet sees the truth....


Big Mouth and Ugly Girl
Joyce Carol Oates
0064473473
April 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Believable, full-blooded characters propel Oates's first YA novel past some plotting that doesn't quite add up. Ursula Riggs, a high school junior, has adopted a stance of invincible indifference ("Since that day I woke up and knew I wasn't an ugly girl, I was Ugly Girl"). Against her mother's wishes, she leaps to her classmate Matt Donaghy's defense when his throwaway joke about blowing up the school makes him a suspected terrorist, but then rebuffs Matt's overtures to friendship. Told in alternating perspectives (Ursula's in first-person and Matt's in third), the novel intensifies even though Matt is quickly exonerated. Matt's friends ice him out, citing pressure from their parents, and his family receives hate mail. When Matt's family files suit against the school and his accusers, the hostilities escalate,...


Best American Mystery Stories 2005
Joyce Carol Carol Oates (Editor)
0618517456
September 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Says series editor Otto Penzler, "It's about finding the best stories, by whoever happens to have written them," in his foreword to this outstanding mystery annual. He chose Joyce Carol Oates as this year's guest editor, and Oates almost immediately put her brand on the book—not waiting for Penzler to send her the top 50 choices from which she would winnow the 20 final entries, but branching out on her own, finding some of the volume's best stories by beginning writers in small circulation magazines as well as in collections from relatively unknown publishers. There's also much star power, made even more impressive by the editors' resistance to famous names getting in on reputation alone. Dennis Lehane's "Until Gwen," Laura Lippman's "The Shoeshine Man's Regrets," Louise Erdrich's...


The Female of the Species: Tales of Mystery and Suspense
Joyce Carol Oates
0151011796
January 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
As evidenced in this collection of nine stories, Oates's imagination is still fertile, feverish and macabre. These females are killers, either by their own hands or through manipulation. To be sure, they have provocation: abandonment, betrayal, abuse, the loss of reason to passion or obsession. In "Hunger," the longest and best of the stories, a rich but neglected corporate wife succumbs to a sexual obsession that ends in murder. Suspenseful and Lolita-like, "Doll: A Romance of the Mississippi," seduces with its lurid concept of a young prostitute who is pimped by her father and degenerates into a homicidal psychopath. Another father tries futilely to protect his frantic daughter from her cruel husband in the haunting "So Help Me God." It seems unlikely, however, that the six-year-old girl in "The Banshee" would...


Middle Age
Joyce Carol Oates
0060934905
Oct 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A romance? The hero dies in the opening pages, adolescents renounce their parents and the grownups aren't true to themselves, much less each other, because they have no idea what they are. In the Lexus-crowded town of Salthill-on-Hudson, husbands and wives share beds in which the linens meet more crisply than the bodies. "How eternal is a single night, and of what eternities are our long marriages composed!" And yet romance is deep in the bones of this soaring epic of renewal and redemption, an Easter of the flesh, a Viagra of the soul. Sculptor Adam Berendt goes into cardiac arrest while saving a child from drowning, and so redeems the 50-somethings of Salthill with his death; he confers the idea and the actuality of grace on their lives. It may be said of Oates's oeuvre that it is a long marriage between author...


The Faith of a Writer: Life, Craft, Art
Joyce Carol Oates
0060565543
September 2004
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In 12 short thematic essays and an interview, all previously published, the hyper-prolific author of novels (Blonde), story collections (Faithless), plays (In Darkest America) and poems (Tenderness) examines the writing life, aiming to focus on "the process of writing more than the uneasy, uncertain position of being a writer." Oates advises young writers to read widely, takes a nostalgic glance back at childhood influences, waxes poetic on the joys of running and its relation to writing, and tackles the inner trajectories of the creative process. The essays are peppered with anecdotes concerning writers' trials, doubts and influences; these well-selected snippets form the most enjoyable and illuminating aspect of the book. If Oates's own insights don't always live up to the wit and beauty of such quoted authors...


Jane Eyre
Charlotte Bronte
0553211404
Sept 1983
Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
For a fan of Gothic romances, the opportunity to listen to a new recording of JANE EYRE is not to be passed up. British actress Juliet Stevenson gives a simply splendid narration. She gives clear voice to the spirited, intelligent, fiercely independent Jane and communicates the heroine's full range of emotions. Stevenson reads at a smooth, even pace, adding just the right amount of drama. If the new release of JANE EYRE at the movies moves many to take another look at the novel, Stevenson's masterful narration would be an excellent choice. C.R.A An AUDIOFILE Earphones Award winner. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Midwest Book Review
This tie-in edition of a classic joins a major motion picture from Miramax Films,...


The Falls
Joyce Carol Oates
0060722290
August 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Oates is not only on her authentically rendered home ground in this sprawling novel set in the city of Niagara Falls during the 1950s, she is also writing at the top of her form. Her febrile prose is especially appropriate to a story as turbulent as the tumultuous waters that have claimed many lives over the years. Widowed on her wedding night when her new husband, a young minister and latent homosexual, throws himself into the falls, Ariah Littrell, the plain, awkward daughter of a minister, henceforth considers herself damned. Her bleak future becomes miraculously bright when Dirk Burnaby, a handsome, wealthy bon vivant with an altruistic heart, falls in love with the media-dubbed Widow-Bride. Their rapturous happiness is shadowed only by Ariah's illogical conviction over the years that Dirk will leave her and...


Blonde
Joyce Carol Oates
006093493X
April 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Penzler Pick, April 2000: It is surprising and shocking to realize that Joyce Carol Oates, one of the great writers living today, has never made The New York Times bestseller list (at least not in recent memory). Far less talented (and less famous) authors have made it while she, in all likelihood not caring much, has been shut out. That could easily change with her new novel, Blonde, which may be the masterpiece of a staggeringly distinguished career.

This 700-plus-page tome is based on the life of (you guessed it) Marilyn Monroe. In fictional form, with names changed (husband Joe DiMaggio is referred to as "The Ex-Athlete," Arthur Miller as "The Playwright," John F. Kennedy as "The President," for example), this may be the most accurate and compelling portrait of this beautiful and complex woman that one is ever likely...



Crimes of Passion
Joyce Carol Oates
0786016507
Sept 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
This ninth installment in the Hot Blood series shows no sign of flagging imagination on the part of the contributors--not surprisingly, because the concept of erotic horror encompasses everything dark and sensual that can happen between two beings (human or otherwise). In fact, in a time when only a few original (or mostly original) anthologies are published each year, Jeff Gelb's and Michael Garrett's has become one to bank on. The 13 stories in Crimes of Passion include three reprints (all from relatively obscure publications such as The Ontario Review) and 11 original tales, by such authors as Ramsey Campbell, Greg Kihn, Lawrence Block, Brian Hodge, Brian Lumley, Tom Piccirilli, and Joyce Carol Oates. There's not a bad story in the bunch, and several are strikingly effective--such as Kihn's acid-tripping nightmare in late...


Heart of Darkness and The Secret Sharer
Joseph Conrad
0451526570
September 1997
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
In HEART OF DARKNESS, Marlow, the narrator, undertakes both an outer and an inner journey. The outer journey takes him into the heart of Africa, where he encounters representatives of every colonial stripe. Performing the work instead of simply reading it, Scott Brick emphasizes this aspect of Conrad's classic, clearly conveying class differences and a range of foreign accents, as well as pidgin. Conrad's prose is dense and complex, but Brick delivers it smoothly and gracefully. However, Marlow's inner journey--during which he confronts the mysterious Mr. Kurtz--remains too distant and intellectualized to fully capture the emotional charge of the moment. G.T.B. © AudioFile 2003, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.