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Women Reading Women Writing: Self-Invention in Paula Gunn Allen, Gloria Anzaldua, and Audre Lorde
Ana-Louise Keating
1566394201
January 1996
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
As self-identified lesbians of color, Paula Gunn Allen, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Audre Lorde negotiate diverse, sometimes conflicting, sets of personal, political, and professional worlds. Drawing on recent developments in feminist studies and queer theory, AnaLouise Keating examines the ways in which these writers, in both their creative and critical work, engage in self-analysis, cultural critique, and the construction of alternative myths and representations of women. Allen, Anzaldúa, and Lorde move within, between, and among the specialized worlds of academia and publishing; the private spaces of families and friends; the politicized communities of Native Americans, Chicanas/os, and African Americans; and the overlapping yet distinct worlds of feminist, lesbian/gay, and U.S. women of color. They translate...


Feminist Rhetorical Theories
Karen A. Foss
076190347X
January 1999
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
Feminist Rhetorical Theories offers feminist rhetorical theories developed from the works of nine feminist theorists who offer important insights into rhetoric and communication—Chris Kramarae, Bell Hooks, Gloria Anzaldua, Mary Daly, Starhawk, Paula Gunn Allen, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Sally Miller Gearhart, and Sonia Johnson. Each of the theories is explicated in terms of the nature of the world or the realm for rhetoric explicated by the theorist, the theorist’s definition of feminism, the nature of the rhetor or the kind of agent the theorist sees as acting in the world, and the rhetorical options envisioned by the theorist as available to rhetors. The resulting theories of rhetoric, which are substantially different from traditional rhetorical theories, re-vision rhetoric and encourage scholars to rethink many...


Women Reading Women Writing: Self-Invention in Paula Gunn Allen, Gloria Anzaldua, and Audre Lorde
Ana-Louise Keating
1566394198
April 1996
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
As self-identified lesbians of color, Paula Gunn Allen, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Audre Lorde negotiate diverse, sometimes conflicting, sets of personal, political, and professional worlds. Drawing on recent developments in feminist studies and queer theory, AnaLouise Keating examines the ways in which these writers, in both their creative and critical work, engage in self-analysis, cultural critique, and the construction of alternative myths and representations of women. Allen, Anzaldúa, and Lorde move within, between, and among the specialized worlds of academia and publishing; the private spaces of families and friends; the politicized communities of Native Americans, Chicanas/os, and African Americans; and the overlapping yet distinct worlds of feminist, lesbian/gay, and U.S. women of color. They translate...


Spider Woman's Granddaughters: Traditional Tales and Contemporary Writing by Native American Women
Paula Gunn Allen (Editor)
044990508X
May 1990
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
These 24 compelling and bleakly evocative narratives compiled by Allen, a professor of Native American studies at the University of California, all stress the theme of loss: loss of identity, loss of culture, loss of personal meaning. By juxtaposing traditional stories with contemporary tales, Allen allows readers to see how the same themes, values and perceptions have endured through the centuries, "testaments to cultural persistence, to a vision and a spiritual reality that will not die." Echoes of the traditional "Oshkikwe's Baby," about an old witch who steals babies, can be found in two stories. In Louise Erdrich's "American Horse," a white social worker separates a boy from his mother for his own "good," to the anguish of mother and son. In "As It Was in the Beginning," by E. Pauline Johnson, a preacher...


Off the Reservation
Paula Gunn Allen
080704640X
Nov 1998
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
While most prior efforts in the genre of the Indian professorial essay collection have drifted between incomprehensible and fanatical, this book from Allen (The Sacred Hoop), of Laguna Pueblo and Lebanese ancestry, is most often even-keeled (if on occasion overwrought: "Let me remind all of us that vegetarianism inevitably accompanies misogyny, racism, tyranny, gynocide, and infanticide"). As with most collections of the sort, the content is all over the map, from rape and misogyny, to criticism of literary criticism, to personal recollections and family ancestry, to an overview of Native spirituality. Even in this broad perspective, there seems to be a unifying theme. Allen best describes this cohesion when she states in the foreword, "Spanning thirty years, from the late sixties to the late nineties, each essay...


Sacred Hoop: Recovering the Feminine in American Indian Traditions
Paula Gunn Gunn Allen
0807046175
September 1992
Paperback
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Book Description
This pioneering work, first published in 1986, documents the continuing vitality of American Indian traditions and the crucial role of women in those traditions.

About the Author
Paula Gunn Allen's books include The Sacred Hoop (Beacon paperback 0-8070-4617-5 / $15.00) and include Grandmothers of the Light (Beacon paperback 0-8070-8103-5 / $14.00). She is professor of English at UCLA.


Pocahontas: Medicine Woman, Spy, Entrepreneur, Diplomat
Paula Gunn Allen
0060730609
October 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In what is presented as the first study of its kind by an American Indian scholar, Allen (The Sacred Hoop) offers a corrective to the romantic story of Pocahontas told initially by Capt. John Smith of the Virginia Company and most recently by Disney Studios. Euro-American historical accounts of Pocahontas's brief life, asserts Allen, typically depict her as a lovelorn and tragic character (she died in 1617 in the aptly named river port of Gravesend, England, at the age of 20 or 21). Allen's Pocahontas, by contrast, is a real visionary, a prodigiously gifted young woman fervently devoted to the spiritual traditions of her people: a loose-knit group of Algonquin tribes known as the Powhatan Alliance, or Tsenacommacah. When the English colonists who began establishing Jamestown in 1607 invaded the Tsenacommacah,...


Pocahontas: Medicine Woman, Spy, Entrepreneur, Diplomat
Paula Gunn Allen
006053687X
October 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In what is presented as the first study of its kind by an American Indian scholar, Allen (The Sacred Hoop) offers a corrective to the romantic story of Pocahontas told initially by Capt. John Smith of the Virginia Company and most recently by Disney Studios. Euro-American historical accounts of Pocahontas's brief life, asserts Allen, typically depict her as a lovelorn and tragic character (she died in 1617 in the aptly named river port of Gravesend, England, at the age of 20 or 21). Allen's Pocahontas, by contrast, is a real visionary, a prodigiously gifted young woman fervently devoted to the spiritual traditions of her people: a loose-knit group of Algonquin tribes known as the Powhatan Alliance, or Tsenacommacah. When the English colonists who began establishing Jamestown in 1607 invaded the Tsenacommacah,...


Hozho¿Walking in Beauty: Native American Stories of Inspiration, Humor, and Life
Paula Gunn Allen
0737305851
April 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
Leading writers and poets, such as LeAnne Howe, Julian Lang, Caren Wallace, and Sulieman Allen, contribute to this collection of stories that captures the Native American spirit, humor, and reality. Hozho , the Navajo word meaning walking in beauty, explores such themes as invisibility, transcendence, the oral tradition, and the role of humor and irony in Indian culture.

From the Back Cover

Hozho--the Navajo word for "walking in beauty"--lies at the heart of these 25 stories of Native American wit and wisdom--stories in which Deer Spirit, Old Coyote, Sacred Mountains, crystal caves, and basketball magic reign.

Survival and transcendence are central themes among Native writings, but humor and a sense of play resonate throughout these tales as well. Featuring...



Life Is a Fatal Disease: Selected Poems, 1964-1994
Paula Gunn Allen
0931122856
December 1997
Paperback
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Book Description
omnibus collection of Allen's work

From the Publisher
Published by West End Press Distributed by University of New Mexico Press


The Woman Who Owned the Shadows
Paula Gunn Allen
1879960184
Dec 1983
Paperback
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Book Description
first novel by & about a Native woman in 50 years --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Gossips, Gorgons and Crones: The Fates of the Earth
Jane Caputi
1879181053
October 1993
Paperback
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From Library Journal
The advent of atomic and nuclear weaponry has greatly influenced American society since 1946. In this strong, insightful book, Caputi (American studies, Univ. of New Mexico) investigates and critiques the influence of nuclear sensibility on American society. Her comprehensive and sharply defining analysis covers the nuclear family, incest, serial killers, advertising, pornography, politics, and language. Caputi asks us to turn away from patriarchal customs and toward a spiritual understanding that is analogous to the Furies, Medusa, and the ancient mothers of Native American spirituality. Her critique is learned, scholarly, and far-reaching. Recommended for collections in women's studies, ecology, sociology, and American studies.- Gail Wood, SUNY Coll. of Technology Lib., AlfredCopyright 1993 Reed Business...

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