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Lucky Jim
Kingsley Amis
0140186301
September 1993
Paperback
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Book Review
Although Kingsley Amis's acid satire of postwar British academic life has lost some of its bite in the four decades since it was published, it's still a rewarding read. And there's no denying how big an impact it had back then--Lucky Jim could be considered the first shot in the Oxbridge salvo that brought us Beyond the Fringe, That Was the Week That Was, and so much more.

In Lucky Jim, Amis introduces us to Jim Dixon, a junior lecturer at a British college who spends his days fending off the legions of malevolent twits that populate the school. His job is in constant danger, often for good reason. Lucky Jim hits the heights whenever Dixon tries to keep a preposterous situation from spinning out of control, which is every three pages or so. The final example of this--a lecture spewed...



Understanding Kingsley Amis
Merritt Moseley
0872498611
May 1993
Hardcover
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Letters of Kingsley Amis
Kingsley Amis
0786867574
October 2001
Hardcover
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The New York Times Book Review
"Beautifully organized and annotated...Some of the best of Amis, it turns out, is in his letters."

Book Description
In 1954, Kingsley Amis grabbed the attention of the literary world as one of the Angry Young Men with his first novel Lucky Jim. He maintained a public image of blistering intelligence, savage wit, and belligerent fierceness of opinion until his death in 1995. In his letters, he confirms the legendary aspects of his reputation, and much more. This collection contains more than eight hundred letters that divulge the secrets of the artist and the man, with an honesty and immediacy rare in any biography or memoir. Amis, so assured in his pronouncements on fellow writers, grapples privately with fears, self-doubts, ambitions, and personal disasters. He...


Man Who Was Thursday
G. K. Chesterton
0140183884
August 1990
Paperback
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Book Review
In an article published the day before his death, G.K. Chesterton called The Man Who Was Thursday "a very melodramatic sort of moonshine." Set in a phantasmagoric London where policemen are poets and anarchists camouflage themselves as, well, anarchists, his 1907 novel offers up one highly colored enigma after another. If that weren't enough, the author also throws in an elephant chase and a hot-air-balloon pursuit in which the pursuers suffer from "the persistent refusal of the balloon to follow the roads, and the still more persistent refusal of the cabmen to follow the balloon."

But Chesterton is also concerned with more serious questions of honor and truth (and less serious ones, perhaps, of duels and dualism). Our hero is Gabriel Syme, a policeman who cannot reveal that his fellow poet Lucian Gregory is an...



The King's English: A Guide to Modern Usage
Kingsley Amis
0312206577
July 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
Kingsley Amis's The King's English is as witty and biting as his novels. Modestly presented as a volume "in which some modern linguistic problems are discussed and perhaps settled," Amis's usage guide is a worthy companion to his revered Fowler's. The King's English is distinctly British, but never mind: it is sensational. And unlike many of his countrymen, Amis is decidedly pro-American, even admitting a "bias towards American modes of expression as likely to seem the livelier and ... smarter alternative." In a world populated by usage mavens too willing to waffle, Amis is refreshingly unequivocal. On the expression meaningful dialogue? It "looks and sounds unbearably pompous. Nevertheless one would not wish to be deprived of a phrase that so unerringly points out its user as a humourless ninny." To cross one's 7's,...


Kingsley Amis,: Modern Novelist
Dale Salwak
0389209929
May 1992
Hardcover
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Book Description
This is a fascinating critical study of the life, work and milieu of one of Britain's best known and most popular novelists. Starting with a biographical overview of the influences on the developing writer while at home, at school, at Oxford, and at war, Dale Salwak goes on to offer the general reader a lively interpretation of all of Amis's novels, from "Lucky Jim" (1954) through to "The Folks That Live on the Hill" (1990), set against the ever-changing backdrop of the twentieth century. Dale Salwak makes extensive use of the major Amis archives, and draws on material from Amis's notebooks, letters, juvenilia and manuscripts, as well as upon his own discussions with Amis and many of his friends. Waving these sources with his own critical appraisal, Salwak plots each step in the development of Amis's imaginative vision...


Father and Son: Kingsley Amis, Martin Amis, and The British Novel Since 1950
Gavin Keulks
0299192105
November 2003
Hardcover
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Review
"Father and Son will be important to specialists in the field as well as to students of the twentieth-century novel generally.  It provides the only extended treatment of a unique literary genealogy."—James Diedrick, Albion College
"Keulks’ book is holding and absorbing, filled with excellently shrewd and steady analysis of selected novels, essays and interviews set in the context of the status and future of the realistic novel, the transition from modernism to postmodernism, and the existential condition of post-World War II life."—Dale Salwak, Citrus College

Book Description
An innovative study of two of England’s most popular, controversial, and influential writers, Father and Son breaks new ground in examining the relationship between...


Father and Son: Kingsley Amis, Martin Amis, and the British Novel since 1950
Gavin Keulks
0299192148
January 2005
Paperback
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You Can't Do Both
Kingsley Amis
0745127711
Nov 1996
Audio Cassette - Unabridged
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Book Description
Robin Davies is both a shrewd observer and an energetic actor in a drama which takes him from school to Oxford. With him we live through all the pangs of a pre-war adolescence in South London, and on through his rites of passage to adulthood, involving rebellion, self-discovery, sex, seduction and commitment. You Can't Do Both is Amis as you know him - brilliantly funny, outrageous, and alive to every social nuance; but also as you've never known him before, writing with tenderness and compelling insight in a story which is strongly autobiographical. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher
'Has you moved to tears. Amis amazes at every turn... A masterpiece from a master' - David Hughes, Mail on Sunday 'Acutely and...


The Green Man
Kingsley Amis
0754006891
Nov 2001
Audio Cassette - Unabridged
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From AudioFile
The Green Man is an English country pub run by a typical Kingsley Amis progatonist, a smart, ironical alcoholic philanderer named Maurice Allingham. The pub is haunted by a wicked seventeenth-century scholar and murderer in the Faustian mode named Thomas Underhill. In his truck with the supernatural dark side, Underhill also raised an evil spirit of the forest apparently made of tree parts, known as The Green Man, who rises again when Allingham tries to sort out the skeletons in his closets. Amis in gothic mode is very entertaining, if not very believable, and Steven Pacey does a deft and fluent job of bringing this lively tale to life. B.G. © AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine

From the Publisher
7 1-hour cassettes


Lucky Him: The Life of Kingsley Amis
Richard Bradford
0720611172
December 2001
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This illuminating biography by a professor of English at the University of Ulster plumbs the interrelationship of life and art an idea Bradford's subject, the late Kingsley Amis (1922-1995), would never have approved of. Amis once declared his novels (beginning with his most celebrated work, Lucky Jim, in 1954) "firmly unautobiographical," but Bradford demonstrates quite the opposite and does so in a way that gives the reader substantially deeper views of both the prolific author's work and the man himself. Combining close reading of the texts fiction, poetry and his substantial body of nonfiction with the already well-documented facts of Amis's life, the book reveals Amis's motivations. In particular, Bradford dissects the overarching theme in Amis's novels: the tension or conflict between what one wants to do...


Koba the Dread: Laughter and the Twenty Million
Martin Amis
1400032202
September 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Everyone knows what the Holocaust was, but, Amis points out, there is no name for and comparatively little public awareness of the killing that took place in the Soviet Union between 1917 and 1933, when 20 million died under a Bolshevik regime that ruled as if waging war against its own people. Why? The U.S.S.R. was effectively a gigantic prison system that was very good at keeping its grisly secrets. Too, communism had widespread support in the rest of the world, as Amis reminds us. Not quite a memoir, this book sandwiches a lengthy treatise on the horror of life in Leninist and Stalinist Russia between Amis's brief personal takes on his gradually dawning awareness of Soviet atrocities. In his first and final pages, he deals with three generations of dupes who supported Soviet rule: that of H.G. Wells and George...


Kingsley Amis

0783800398
Jan 1998
Large Print Hardcover
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Book Description
Series Editors: James Nagel, University of Georgia; Zack Bowen, University of Miami and Robert Lecker, McGill University The full range of literary traditions comes to life in the Twayne Critical Essays Series. Volume editors have carefully selected critical essays that represent the full spectrum of controversies, trends and methodologies relating to each author's work. Essays include writings from the author's native country and abroad, with interpretations from the time they were writing, through the present day. Each volume includes: An introduction providing the reader with a lucid overview of criticism from its beginnings-illuminating controversies, evaluating approaches, and sorting out the schools of thought The most influential reviews and the best reprinted scholarly essays A section devoted exclusively...

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