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Jane Freilicher
Klaus Kertess
0810949636
Nov 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
Jane Freilicher, one of the most admired painters at work today, came of age in the era of Abstract Expressionism. Studying with Hans Hofmann, she became a pivotal member of an important group of New York artists and writers, including the poet John Ashbery (who has written poems in which she figures), the photographer Rudy Burckhardt, and the painters Fairfield Porter and Larry Rivers. Yet for more than 50 years, she has pursued her own distinctive style, an intimate and painterly realism.

This book is a comprehensive survey of Freilicher's career, written by Klaus Kertess, a well-known authority on contemporary art. Lavishly illustrated with more than 150 images, the volume features five decades of her work, including the New York cityscapes, landscapes of Long Island, and still lifes, especially of flowers,...


The Oxford Book of American Poetry
David Lehman
019516251X
March 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
Here is the eagerly awaited new edition of The Oxford Book of American Poetry brought completely up to date and dramatically expanded by poet David Lehman. It is a rich, capacious volume, featuring the work of more than 200 poets-almost three times as many as the 1976 edition. With a succinct
and often witty head note introducing each author, it is certain to become the definitive anthology of American poetry for our time.

Lehman has gathered together all the works one would expect to find in a landmark collection of American poetry, from Whitman's Crossing Brooklyn Ferry to Stevens's The Idea of Order at Key West, and from Eliot's The Waste Land to Ashbery's Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror. But equally important,
the editor has significantly expanded the range of the anthology. The book includes not...


Where Shall I Wander
John Ashbery
0060765291
Mar 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This 23rd collection from Harold Bloom's favorite living American poet is a modestly scaled affair: it doesn't end with a grand long poem, which has become an Ashbery trademark since Rivers and Mountains, nor is it especially big like Can You Hear, Bird nor does it even contain many poems that extend more than three pages (the title poem, at seven pages, is the longest). The book as a whole takes the pleasures of games and makes of them poetic seductions; the adjective "Ashberian"—part Joseph Cornell, part Henry James, part Close Encounters—is perhaps the only one possible to describe the work at this point: "Another's narrative supplants the crawling/ stock-market quotes. Like all good things/ life tends to go on too long.../ Rains bathe the rainbow,/ and the shape of night is an empty cylinder,/...


The Best American Poetry 2005 (Best American Poetry Series)
Paul Muldoon (Editor)
0743257588
September 2005
Paperback
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Review
"Each year, a vivid snapshot of what a distinguished poet finds exciting, fresh and memorable: and over the years, as good a comprehensive overview of contemporary poetry as there can be."-- Robert Pinsky

Book Description
This eagerly awaited volume in the celebrated Best American Poetry series reflects the latest developments and represents the state of the art today. Paul Muldoon, the distinguished poet and international literary eminence, has selected -- from a pool of several thousand published candidates -- the top seventy-five poems of the year.With insightful comments from the poets illuminating their work, and series editor David Lehman's perspicacious foreword, The Best American Poetry 2005 is indispensable for every poetry enthusiast.

See...


Where Shall I Wander
John Ashbery
0060765305
Mar 2006
Paperback
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Book Description

You meant more than life to me. I lived
through you not knowing, not knowing I
was living.
I learned that you called for me. I came to
where you were living, up a stair. There
was no one there.
No one to appreciate me. The legality of it
upset a chair. Many times to celebrate
we were called together and where
we had been there was nothing there,
nothing that is anywhere. We passed
obliquely,
leaving no stare. When the sun was done
muttering,
in an optimistic way, it was time to leave
that there.

-- from "The New Higher"

About the Author

John Ashbery was born in Rochester, New York, in 1927. He is the author of more than twenty books of poetry, including Chinese...



John Ashbery
Michael Baughan
0791078876
January 2004
Hardcover
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Selected Poems
John Ashbery
0140585532
Dec 1986
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Self-Portrait won a Pulizer Prize, National Book Award, and National Book Critics Circle Award, but Ashbery remains famously abstruse. "Something important is going on here," says LJ reviewer Graham Christian, "and on the chance that we figure it out, Selected Poems is worth having."Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.


Invisible Listeners: Lyric Intimacy in Herbert, Whitman, and Ashbery
Helen Vendler
0691116180
August 2005
Hardcover
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Merle Rubin, The Christian Science Monitor
"... asks why a poet would seek to establish a deeply personal state of intimacy with an invisible, imaginary audience".

Review
Langdon Hammer The New York Times Book Review : A compact study of 'lyric intimacy' . . . [Invisible Listeners] demonstrates . . . some of the best reasons to read literary criticism.

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Self Portrait
John Ashbery
0140586687
Jan 1990
Paperback
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The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th Edition
Margaret Ferguson (Editor)
0393979202
December 2004
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
Long the classic anthology of poetry in English, The Norton Anthology of Poetry, Fifth Edition, adds to its wealth of known and loved poems a rich gathering of new poetry. Beginning with Beowulf, newly represented by selections from Seamus Heaney's dazzling translation, and continuing to the present day, The Norton Anthology of Poetry includes over 1,700 poems by 340 poets in the Regular Edition. Many major figures—from Chaucer and Shakespeare to Ashbery and Walcott—have expanded sections, and a range of outstanding younger voices have been newly added. Concise annotations, biographical sketches, an Essay on Versification by Jon Stallworthy, and, new to this edition, an Essay on Poetic Syntax by Margaret Ferguson help readers understand and enjoy the poems.


Soft Sift
Mark Ford
015100949X
Apr 2003
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Though U.K. sophisticates have been Ford fans for a decade, the London-based poet's first U.S. notice came with his recent critical volume Raymond Roussel and the Republic of Dreams. He makes his American poetic debut in this slippery and smart volume of short poems. The people in Ford's poems move along misty, up-to-date paths through their cityscapes, musing on problems as recherch‚ as the nature of power, or as ordinary as the end of a romance: "Brinkmanship" imagines "moving/ Through time and air as if each mirrored the other," while the ironically titled "Twenty Twenty Vision" explains "my doom is never to forget/ My lost bearings." Some shorter poems mock the academy or explore the "ruthless, intricate currents" of travel and thought. Other poems offer warmer, less ironized pleasures: "Pinch me, pinch...


The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry
J. D. McClatchy
1400030935
April 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Poetry devotees will be familiar with much of the work in this fine collection, which focuses on the period from WW II until the present. Sixty-five poets, including such well-known writers as Robert Lowell, Allen Ginsberg, Theodore Roethke, Anne Sexton, James Dickey, Denise Levertov and Gary Snyder, are represented by anywhere from one to a dozen poems each, as well as a brief biography that touches on the writer's aesthetic ideas. McClatchy, himself a poet and critic, has done an exceptional job of selecting works that typify the poets' styles and beliefs. Standouts are Elizabeth Bishop's "In the Waiting Room," about the poet's first perception of herself in relation to others; Randall Jarrell's "The Woman at the Washington Zoo," which deals with the dull, emotionless routine of modern life; Frank O'Hara's...


Wonder Tales
Marina Warner
0195178211
Sept 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Originally published centuries ago, the six French fairy tales collected in this charmingly refined little volume appear here, some for the first time in English, in graceful contemporary translations by five internationally recognized writers, including Gilbert Adair, John Ashbery and A.S. Byatt. In her erudite 15-page introduction, novelist and critic Warner (From the Beast to the Blonde: On Fairy Tales and Their Tellers) details how the literary form was invented by French aristocrats during the reign of Louis XIV. Fairy tales were written mostly by women, who gave them universal significance with a feminist subtext, emphasizing, writes Warner, "trueness of heart and toughness of mind." Magic and metamorphosis are distinguishing characteristics of the genre. Centaurs, fairies and talking cats populate the six...


John Ashbery in Conversation with Mark Ford, Vol. 12
Mark Ford
1903291127
June 2003
Paperback
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A Joseph Cornell Album
Dore Ashton
0306803720
Sept 2002
Paperback
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Hilton Kramer, New York Times Book Review
"The small boxes and collages upon which Cornell lavished his immense gifts are now among the most highly prized of contemporary works of art....Ashton dwells at length on those figures whom Cornell held in sacred regard....A great pleasure to read and look at."

Book Description
A lavishly illustrated homage to one of the twentieth century's most enigmatic artists. With affection and critical respect, a celebrated art historian has gathered an unprecedented wealth of material about the shy but immensely influential artist who lived on incongruously named Utopia Parkway in Queens, New York.

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On the Outside Looking Out: John Ashbery's Poetry
Based On Work by John Ashbery
0674636139
January 1995
Paperback
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John Ashbery and American Poetry
David Herd
0312239319
Apr 2001
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In the poetry trade, what often unites the dullest "workshop" conservative and the wildest experimentalist is a shared regard for the poems of Ashbery, even if they are often different poems. But what also unites every reader of Ashbery is the mystery of how his singular achievement came to be, of how the poet developed and sustained a body of work at once so intimate and unknowable. A lecturer in English and French literature at the University of Kent, Herd, in his extraordinarily lucid and jargon-free monograph, is smart enough not to attempt a definitive answer to such questions, but his command of the materials that prompt the questions can only illuminate numerous aspects of Ashbery's long and complex career. Herd's basic thesis that Ashbery's ambition is to write a poem "fit for its occasion," in which the...


The Collected Poems of Kenneth Koch
Kenneth Koch
1400044995
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
[Signature]Reviewed by John AshberySome poets have difficulty putting pen to paper. Kenneth Koch, on the contrary, could simply not stop producing poetry. Writing and living were all but synonymous for him. The results are brought together in his almost 800-page Collected Poems, which doesn't even include long poems like the Byronic epic about a Japanese baseball player, "Ko, or a Season on Earth." (Koch's Collected Longer Poems are scheduled to come out next fall.)Koch and I became friends at Harvard in the late 1940s. We renewed our friendship when I moved to New York in 1949; Frank O'Hara arrived there two years later, and we all met up with James Schuyler and Barbara Guest shortly afterward. Caught up in the effervescent art world of that time, along with our painter friends Jane Freilicher, Nell Blaine and...


How Poets See the World
Willard Spiegelman
0195174917
June 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Although readers of prose fiction sometimes find descriptive passages superfluous or boring, description itself is often the most important aspect of a poem. This book examines how a variety of contemporary poets use description in their work.
Description has been the great burden of poetry. How do poets see the world? How do they look at it? What do they look for? Is description an end in itself, or a means of expressing desire? Ezra Pound demanded that a poem should represent the external world as objectively and directly as possible,
and William Butler Yeats, in his introduction to The Oxford Book of Modern Verse (1936), said that he and his generation were rebelling against, inter alia, "irrelevant descriptions of nature" in the work of their predecessors. The poets in this book, however, who are distinct...


Chinese Whispers
John Ashbery
0374122571
Oct 2002
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Ashbery's most recent style equal parts cracked drawing room dialogue, 4-H Americana, withering sarcasm and sleeve-worn pathos has been perfected over five or so books and adapted by generationally diverse poets from James Tate to Max Winter. The late Kenneth Koch's description of Ashbery as "lazy and quick" remains thoroughly apropos; these 61 page-or-two poems can seem brilliantly tossed off, much like those in his 2000 collection, Your Name Here. The title is appropriate too: Chinese Whispers is the British name for the game of Telephone, where children (or adults) gather in a circle and whisper a "secret" word or phrase into the ear next to them. The last person says it out loud; the results are often "off" in funny, surprising and telling ways. The surprise, in poem after poem, is that high and low comedy...

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