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The Young Apollo and Other Stories
Louis Auchincloss
0618551158
April 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
Bringing together twelve previously unpublished pieces, The Young Apollo and Other Stories sparkles with Auchincloss's singular style, and like East Side Story reveals in precise, aphoristic prose "not only the textures of this world but also its elemental and evolving truths" (New York Times). From Edwardian garden parties to the Manhattan demimonde of the 1970s, Auchincloss travels with economical grace and agility in this collection, which illuminates the moral ambiguities both personal and professional of New York's moneyed class. A loving chronicle of a waning world, this new collection is an acute and gimlet-eyed portrait that refuses to hesitate in the face of its characters" less than savory ambitions and desires. In the title story, an older man eulogizes his young friend, the golden Lionel Trillingmuse to...


Writers and Personality
Louis Auchincloss
1570035806
June 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Auchincloss has read widely for this slim collection of impressionistic essays; the short chapter on Prosper Mérimée may well send readers scurrying to their encyclopedias. But for all the considerable charm of his personal reactions to authors ranging from the Brontës to Proust, going through their fiction with his own sense as a novelist of what makes great fiction work, the central thesis—that the personality of the writer may shape, and be discerned in, the writing—is somewhat thin. Most of Auchincloss's literary judgments, such as dubbing Dreiser "a kind of American Zola" or praising Middlemarch as "the greatest novel of manners of the Victorian age," are uncontroversial. Even where he goes against the grain, he does so mildly, noting that Hemingway and Fitzgerald "brought a...


Rise of Silas Lapham
William Dean Howells
0451528220
March 2002
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
First published in book form in 1885, William Dean Howells's timeless epic of a self-made man, The Rise of Silas Lapham was the first important novel to center on the American businessman-and the first to treat its theme with a realism that was to foreshadow the work of modern writers.

Download Description
Brought up by nothing but hisself.

See all Editorial Reviews


Edith Wharton
Edith Wharton
1931082863
Oct 2005
Hardcover
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A Backward Glance: An Autobiography
Edith Wharton
0684847558
July 1998
Paperback
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Book Description
A Backward Glance is Edith Wharton's vivid account of both her public and her private life. With richness and delicacy, it describes the sophisticated New York society in which Wharton spent her youth, and chronicles her travels throughout Europe and her literary success as an adult. Beautifully depicted are her friendships with many of the most celebrated artists and writers of her day, including her close friend Henry James.In his introduction to this edition, Louis Auchincloss calls the writing in A Backward Glance "as firm and crisp and lucid as in the best of her novels." It is a memoir that will charm and fascinate all readers of Wharton's fiction.

About the Author
Edith Wharton was born in 1862 into one of New York's older and richer families and was educated here and...


Wings of the Dove
Henry James
0460876171
May 1997
Paperback
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Book Review
The Wings of the Dove is a classic example of Henry James's morality tales that play off the naiveté of an American protagonist abroad. In early-20th-century London, Kate Croy and Merton Densher are engaged in a passionate, clandestine love affair. Croy is desperately in love with Densher, who has all the qualities of a potentially excellent husband: he's handsome, witty, and idealistic--the one thing he lacks is money, which ultimately renders him unsuitable as a mate. By chance, Croy befriends a young American heiress, Milly Theale. When Croy discovers that Theale suffers from a mysterious and fatal malady, she hatches a plan that can give all three characters something that they want--at a price. Croy and Densher plan to accompany the young woman to Venice where Densher, according to Croy's design, will...


Theodore Roosevelt
Louis Auchincloss
0805069062
Jan 2002
Hardcover
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Book Review
Theodore Roosevelt was a man of contradictions: a warrior who won the Nobel Peace prize, a wealthy man who battled corporate greed, a thinker who prized action more than words (but who wrote fine books himself).

He was also, writes Louis Auchincloss in this lucid biography, an extraordinary leader, "a political idealist who had the wisdom to know that only by astute and well-considered compromise in our legislative process could he hope to see enacted even a fraction of the social and military programs that he deemed ... essential to the welfare of his nation." Compromise he did, of course, though in the end the war hero and trustbuster could not bring the right wing of the Republican Party to see the wisdom of his reformist ways. The result, Auchincloss chronicles, was a terrible split, bringing about the...



Louis Auchincloss: The Growth of a Novelist
Vincent Piket
031205307X
January 1991
Hardcover
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The Reef
Edith Wharton
0684824442
July 1996
Paperback
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From AudioFile
Like Henry James, who profoundly influenced her writing, the American novelist Edith Wharton spent most of her professional life in Europe. THE REEF exemplifies her close observation of Americans in France, their inner lives and social conflicts. Narrator Bron's precise, patrician intonations nicely reflect the narrative personality. She does only a serviceable job on descriptive passages, jumping to life in the dialogue. Y.R. © AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Book Description
"I put most of myself into that opus," Edith Wharton said of The Reef, possibly her most autobiographical novel. Published in 1912, it was, Bernard Berenson told Henry Adams, "better...


Theodore Roosevelt: The Rough Riders and an Autobiography
Theodore Roosevelt
1931082650
October 2004
Hardcover
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Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
1931082669
Oct 2004
Hardcover
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The Age of Innocence
Edith Wharton
0375753206
Mar 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
Somewhere in this book, Wharton observes that clever liars always come up with good stories to back up their fabrications, but that really clever liars don't bother to explain anything at all. This is the kind of insight that makes The Age of Innocence so indispensable. Wharton's story of the upper classes of Old New York, and Newland Archer's impossible love for the disgraced Countess Olenska, is a perfectly wrought book about an era when upper-class culture in this country was still a mixture of American and European extracts, and when "society" had rules as rigid as any in history.

From AudioFile
Welcome to the New York of the 1870's, where everyone in the upper crust fits into the mold or is ostracized for nonconformity. In spite of having married the socially suitable...


The Wings of the Dove (Everyman's Library)
Henry James
0679455124
April 1997
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
The Wings of the Dove is a classic example of Henry James's morality tales that play off the naiveté of an American protagonist abroad. In early-20th-century London, Kate Croy and Merton Densher are engaged in a passionate, clandestine love affair. Croy is desperately in love with Densher, who has all the qualities of a potentially excellent husband: he's handsome, witty, and idealistic--the one thing he lacks is money, which ultimately renders him unsuitable as a mate. By chance, Croy befriends a young American heiress, Milly Theale. When Croy discovers that Theale suffers from a mysterious and fatal malady, she hatches a plan that can give all three characters something that they want--at a price. Croy and Densher plan to accompany the young woman to Venice where Densher, according to Croy's design, will...


Collected Stories of Louis Auchincloss
Louis Auchincloss
0735100519
November 1998
Library Binding
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From Publishers Weekly
Spanning Auchincloss's distinguished career from the first story to appear under his own name up to the present, this hefty collection displays consistent excellence in observing the spheres of art, law, money and society. In the tradition of Henry James and Edith Wharton, even the briefest pieces, "The Reckoning" and "The Novelist of Manners," offer a novel's richness of character and plot, as people and art, morality and etiquette mix uneasily. Auchincloss adds historical and aesthetic twists to the psychologically ambiguous ghost story "The Prison Window" and to "They That Have the Power to Hurt," about the late-blooming affair between a lady novelist and a writer manque. Many entries contain enough material for two or three narratives, such as the stories of the law clerks of "The Mavericks" or of the pre-...


Her Infinite Variety
Louis Auchincloss
0618021914
Aug 2000
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Over the course of his long career, Auchincloss (The Education of Oscar Fairfax, etc.) has always excelled in portraying women of the upper class. In the past, his female characters were often anachronistic members of a society whose strict rules of conduct and social acceptance were ceasing to matter. Here he transcends himself with an astute and witty novel about a woman who disdains the old values of money and class in favor of a feminine meritocracy in the world of business. As becomes abundantly clear in her brilliant rise to power, however, Clara Longcope Hoyt Tyler is skilled at using her beauty to open doors and secure advancement. The bright, strong-willed, refreshingly spirited daughter of a Yale professor and a domineering, socially obsessed mother, Vassar undergrad Clara almost makes a disastrous...


The Wings of the Dove: A Norton Critical Edition
Henry James
0393978818
August 2002
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
The text of this 1902 novel is again that of the fully corrected and annotated reprint of the New York Edition (1909), together with James's preface and the two frontispieces he commissioned for the New York Edition of The Wings of the Dove. The "Textual Appendix" includes notes on the novel's textual history and lists all substantive revisions that James made to the novel, both in 1902 and in 1909. "The Author and the Novel," introduced by editorial commentary and new to the Second Edition, includes selections from James's notebooks, letters, travel books, and autobiographical writings, which illuminate his conception and assessment of The Wings of the Dove. "Criticism" reflects the lively interpretive and theoretical writing that The Wings of the Dove has enjoyed since the previous edition was published in 1978....


Manhattan Monologues
Louis Auchincloss
061815289X
July 2002
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Auchincloss mines familiar ground-life in New York's financial and cultural top drawer during the 20th century and its accompanying upheavals-in his 57th book, a collection of 10 previously unpublished stories. Nearly every character is the scion of some great banking family or a partner in one of Manhattan's prestigious law firms, and an air of entitlement weighs heavily on each story, though this is balanced with equal parts humor and pathos. The protagonists' world of elite boarding schools and exclusive clubs is redolent of a not-so-distant past of privilege, but the characters remain endearingly human in their foibles and follies. In "Harry's Brother," awkward Charles Pierce Jr. spends his entire life in the shadow of his roguish, popular younger sibling; a woman's efforts to find a suitable bride for her...


The Mother's Recompense
Edith Wharton
0684825317
September 1996
Paperback
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Book Description
Opening on the French Riviera among a motley community of American expatriates, The Mother's Recompense tells the story of Kate Clephane and her reluctant return to New York society after being exiled years before for abandoning her husband and infant daughter.Oddly enough, Kate has been summoned back by that same daughter, Anne, now fully grown and intent on marrying Chris Fenno, a war hero, dilettante, and social opportunist. Chris's questionable intentions toward her daughter are, however, the least of Kate's worries since she was once, and still is, deeply in love with him. Kate's moral quandary and the ensuing drama evoke comparison with Oedipus and Hamlet and lead to an ending that startled the mores of the day.

About the Author
Edith Wharton was the first woman to win...

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