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The Brooklyn Follies
Paul Auster
0805077146
December 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Nathan Glass, a retired life insurance salesman estranged from his family and facing an iffy cancer prognosis, is "looking for a quiet place to die. Someone recommended Brooklyn." What he finds, though, in this ebullient novel by Brooklyn bard Auster (Oracle Night), is a vital, big-hearted borough brimming with great characters. These include Nathan's nephew, Tom, a grad student turned spiritually questing cab driver; Tom's serenely silent nine-year-old niece, who shows up on Tom's doorstep without her unstable mom; and a flamboyant book dealer hatching a scheme to sell a fraudulent manuscript of The Scarlet Letter. As Nathan recovers his soul through immersion in their lives, Auster meditates on the theme of sanctuary in American literature, from Hawthorne to Poe to Thoreau, infusing the...


The Invention of Solitude
Paul Auster
0140106286
May 1988
Paperback
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Book Review
Beginning with the deconstructed detective novels of the New York Trilogy, Paul Auster has proved himself to be one of the most adventurous writers in contemporary fiction. In book after book, he seems compelled to reinvent his style from scratch. Yet he always returns to certain preoccupations--most notably, solitude and coincidence--and these themes get a powerful workout in this early memoir. In the first half, "Portrait of an Invisible Man," Auster comes to terms with the death of his father, and as he investigates this elusive figure, he makes a rather shocking (and enlightening) discovery about his family's history. The second half, "The Book of Memory," finds the author on more abstract ground, toying with the entwined metaphors of coincidence, translation, solitude, and language. But here, too,...


The New York Trilogy: City of Glass/Ghosts/The Locked Room
Paul Auster
0140131558
April 1990
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Paul Auster’s signature work, The New York Trilogy, consists of three interlocking novels: City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room—haunting and mysterious tales that move at the breathless pace of a thriller. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author
Paul Auster’s novels include Brooklyn Follies, Oracle Night, and In the Country of Last Things, as well as two memoirs, a collection of essays, a volume of poems, and the screenplays for several films. Luc Sante is best known for his first book, Low Life. He has also written introductions to books by Georges Simenon, Jacob Riis, and many other authors. Art Spiegelman is a cartoonist who first came to attention in the early 1980s with a magazine he edited called Raw. Maus,...


Don Quixote: A New Translation by Edith Grossman
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
0060934344
April 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
There would seem to be little reason for yet another translation of Don Quixote. Translated into English some 20 times since the novel appeared in two parts in 1605 and 1615, and at least five times in the last half-century, it is currently available in multiple editions (the most recent is the 1999 Norton Critical Edition translated by Burton Raffel). Yet Grossman bravely attempts a fresh rendition of the adventures of the intrepid knight Don Quixote and his humble squire Sancho Panza. As the respected translator of many of Latin America's finest writers (among them Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Carlos Fuentes and Mario Vargas Llosa), she is well suited to the task, and her translation is admirably readable and consistent while managing to retain the vigor, sly humor and colloquial playfulness of the Spanish. Erring...


Moon Palace
Paul Auster
0140115854
Apr 1990
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Marco Fogg, loner and dreamer, is forced from his Manhattan apartment and roams Central Park as a vagrant until he is rescued by gentle Kitty Wu. "The moon as a poetic and planetary influence over earthly affairs runs as a theme, wittily ransacked, throughout this elegant fiction," said PW . Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
"It was the summer that men first walked on the moon. I was very young back then, but I did not believe there would ever be a future." Yet this novel deals precisely with the future that protagonist Marco Stanley Fogg seems to doubt the most: his own. We see Marco through several quite remarkable years, during which he nearly starves himself to death out of poverty and dejection, is rescued by a beautiful Chinese girl...


Timbuktu
Paul Auster
0312263996
May 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In Timbuktu Paul Auster tackles homelessness in America using a dog as his point-of-view character. Strange as the premise seems, it's been done before, in John Berger's King, and it actually works. Filtering the homeless experience through the relentlessly unsentimental eye of a dog, both writers avoid miring their tales in an excess of melodrama. Whereas Berger's book skips among several characters, Timbuktu remains tightly focused on just two: Mr. Bones, "a mutt of no particular worth or distinction," and his master, Willy G. Christmas, a middle-aged schizophrenic who has been on the streets since the death of his mother four years before. The novel begins with Willy and Mr. Bones in Baltimore searching for a former high school English teacher who had encouraged the teenage Willy's writerly aspirations. Now Willy is dying...


The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert
Joseph Joubert
1590171489
June 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The elusive French luminary Joseph Joubert is a great explorer of the mind's open spaces. Edited and translated by Paul Auster, this selection from Joubert's notebooks introduces a master of the enigmatic who seeks "to call everything by its true name" while asking us to "remember everything is double." "Joubert speaks in whispers," Auster writes. "One must draw very close to hear what he is saying."


Don Quixote: A New Translation by Edith Grossman
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
0060188707
October 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
There would seem to be little reason for yet another translation of Don Quixote. Translated into English some 20 times since the novel appeared in two parts in 1605 and 1615, and at least five times in the last half-century, it is currently available in multiple editions (the most recent is the 1999 Norton Critical Edition translated by Burton Raffel). Yet Grossman bravely attempts a fresh rendition of the adventures of the intrepid knight Don Quixote and his humble squire Sancho Panza. As the respected translator of many of Latin America's finest writers (among them Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Carlos Fuentes and Mario Vargas Llosa), she is well suited to the task, and her translation is admirably readable and consistent while managing to retain the vigor, sly humor and colloquial playfulness of the Spanish. Erring...


New York Trilogy
Paul Auster
0143039830
March 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Paul Auster’s signature work, The New York Trilogy, consists of three interlocking novels: City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room—haunting and mysterious tales that move at the breathless pace of a thriller.

About the Author
Paul Auster’s novels include Brooklyn Follies, Oracle Night, and In the Country of Last Things, as well as two memoirs, a collection of essays, a volume of poems, and the screenplays for several films. Luc Sante is best known for his first book, Low Life. He has also written introductions to books by Georges Simenon, Jacob Riis, and many other authors. Art Spiegelman is a cartoonist who first came to attention in the early 1980s with a magazine he edited called Raw. Maus, his graphic novel about the Holocaust, won him the...


Oracle Night
Paul Auster
0312423667
Nov 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In Oracle Night, Paul Auster returns to one of his favorite themes: writing about writers and the act of writing. Recovering from a severe illness that has left him weak and prone to nosebleeds, struggling novelist Sidney Orr takes the suggestion of his mentor, the acclaimed novelist John Trause, and begins a story about a man who, upon considering a near-death experience as an omen (or excuse), walks out on his wife and begins a new life. Nick Bowen, Orr's protagonist, moves to Kansas City and finds work with a man engaged in creating a sort of catalogue of all known persons from a warehouse filled with phonebooks. Dressed in Goodwill clothing, Nick finds it "fitting to don the wardrobe of a man who has likewise ceased to exist--as if that double negation made the erasure of his past more thorough, more permanent." Grace,...


Empire City: New York through the Centuries
Kenneth T. Jackson (Editor)
0231109091
August 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Jackson, editor of the celebrated Encyclopedia of New York City, and Dunbar, founder of the CITYterm program (an academic program for high school students), embrace an enormous range of writing about Gotham in this historical anthology. If the tension between commerce and culture is not unique to New York, the editors state at the outset, the city's special role is to test the tension between assimilation and diversity, not to mention that between public and private. Their annotations find these and other themes in a grand variety of writings, from an account of Henry Hudson's voyage in 1611 to one of the September 11 terrorist attacks by John P. Avlon, former chief speechwriter and deputy communications director to Mayor Giuliani; Avlon was responsible for writing more than 400 eulogies for city workers. Aside...


The Book of Illusions
Paul Auster
0060511893
Sept 2002
Audio Cassette - Unabridged
·
 
Book Review
Vermont professor David Zimmer is a broken man. The protagonist of Paul Auster's 10th novel, The Book of Illusions, hits a period in which life seemed to be working aggressively against him. After his wife and sons are killed in an airplane crash, Zimmer becomes an alcoholic recluse, fond of emptying his bottle of sleeping pills into his palm, contemplating his next move. But one night, while watching a television documentary, Zimmer's attention is caught by the silent-film comedian Hector Mann, who had disappeared without a trace in 1929 and who was considered long-dead. Soon, Zimmer begins work on a book about Mann's newly discovered films (copies of which had been sent, anonymously, to film archives around the world). The spirit of Hector Mann keeps David Zimmer alive for a year. When a letter arrives from someone...


The Nathaniel Hawthorne Audio Collection
Nathaniel Hawthorne
0060555688
May 2003
Audio Compact Disc - Unabridged
·
 
From AudioFile
From the accompanying paperback to the folio of CDs to the wonderful writing beautifully read, this is lovely production. The collection focuses on what Paul Auster, in his thoughtful introduction, describes as "one of the least-known works by a well-known writer in all of literature." It's a delightful, often funny diary kept by Nathaniel Hawthorne about three weeks in 1851 that he spent alone with his 5-year-old son. The diary, entitled "Twenty Days with Julian & Little Bunny, by Papa," is followed by readings of three of Hawthorne's best-known stories, which were conceived around the same time as he kept the diary. Auster, the critically acclaimed author, is also a wonderful reader. No dialects and voices--instead, he reads his own introduction and "Twenty Days" with his trademark seductive voice and precise control....


I Thought My Father Was God: And Other True Tales from NPR's National Story Project
Paul Auster (Editor)
0312421001
September 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
When the call went out to listeners of National Public Radio's Weekend All Things Considered to submit stories about their personal experiences, the results were overwhelming. I Thought My Father Was God: And Other True Tales from NPR's National Story Project contains editor Paul Auster's pick of the best submissions. The stories, whether fact or fiction, all exhibit a heartfelt earnestness to be heard, and share similar themes of bizarre coincidences, otherworldly intervention, love and loss, life-changing experiences, and mundane pleasures. Some are deeply moving, most are not. But it is uplifting and well worth the time to sift through these brief snapshots of our collective human experience.

To give the book shape, Auster has done his best to categorize the material by subject, such as Animals, Families, War, Love,...



Oracle Night
Paul Auster
0060589841
Dec 2003
Audio Cassette - Unabridged
·
 
Book Review
In Oracle Night, Paul Auster returns to one of his favorite themes: writing about writers and the act of writing. Recovering from a severe illness that has left him weak and prone to nosebleeds, struggling novelist Sidney Orr takes the suggestion of his mentor, the acclaimed novelist John Trause, and begins a story about a man who, upon considering a near-death experience as an omen (or excuse), walks out on his wife and begins a new life. Nick Bowen, Orr's protagonist, moves to Kansas City and finds work with a man engaged in creating a sort of catalogue of all known persons from a warehouse filled with phonebooks. Dressed in Goodwill clothing, Nick finds it "fitting to don the wardrobe of a man who has likewise ceased to exist--as if that double negation made the erasure of his past more thorough, more permanent." Grace,...


The Book of Illusions: A Novel
Paul Auster
0312421818
August 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Vermont professor David Zimmer is a broken man. The protagonist of Paul Auster's 10th novel, The Book of Illusions, hits a period in which life seemed to be working aggressively against him. After his wife and sons are killed in an airplane crash, Zimmer becomes an alcoholic recluse, fond of emptying his bottle of sleeping pills into his palm, contemplating his next move. But one night, while watching a television documentary, Zimmer's attention is caught by the silent-film comedian Hector Mann, who had disappeared without a trace in 1929 and who was considered long-dead. Soon, Zimmer begins work on a book about Mann's newly discovered films (copies of which had been sent, anonymously, to film archives around the world). The spirit of Hector Mann keeps David Zimmer alive for a year. When a letter arrives from someone...

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