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Nightwood
Djuna Barnes
0811200051
June 1961
Paperback
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Book Review
Nightwood is not only a classic of lesbian literature, but was also acknowledged by no less than T. S. Eliot as one of the great novels of the 20th century. Eliot admired Djuna Barnes' rich, evocative language. Lesbian readers will admire the exquisite craftsmanship and Barnes' penetrating insights into obsessive passion. Barnes told a friend that Nightwood was written with her own blood "while it was still running." That flowing wound was the breakup of an eight-year relationship with the lesbian love of her life.

Review
The Modern Library of the World's Best Books

"Djuna Barnes understood obsession, particularly erotic obsession. . . . Nothing is minimal in [Nightwood]. Passion rules. Anyone who has gone out of his or her way to walk past a lost lover's...


Written Lives
Javier Marias
081121611X
February 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The writers whose lives are sketched in this quirky and appealing book by the world-renowned (though less so here) Spanish writer Marías are familiar to any avid reader: Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Djuna Barnes and William Faulkner, among others. Marias says his aim is to examine writers about whom "absolutely everything" is already known and portray them "as if they were fictional characters." He distills each writer's salient personality traits to outline definitive if idiosyncratic portraits: thus "Nabokov in Rapture"; "Ivan Turgenev in His Sadness." Almost all of these essays display Marías 's dry humor and affectionate tolerance for his subjects' eccentricities, but the portrayals of Thomas Mann, James Joyce and Yukio Mishima bristle with Marías 's disdain. And sometimes the title phrase...


Collected Poems: with Notes Toward the Memoirs of Djuna Barnes
Djuna Barnes
0299212300
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Famous for her grim lesbian novel Nightwood (1936) and for her life as a fabulous expatriate in Paris between WWI and WWII, Barnes (1892– 1982) has never enjoyed a reputation as a poet, partly because almost none of her post-Nightwood verse saw print. This diligent and exhaustive edition both restores her hard-to-find magazine verse of the 1910s and 1920s and makes available her dense, sardonic late poems. The early poems are conventional in form, but extreme in emotion. Some focus on same-sex desire; others perform a self-conscious wildness, with disturbing or deadly tableaux—a lady's "profile like a dagger lain/ Between the hair," a "snail that marks the girth of night with slime." The later poetry, as the editors write, "challenges us to savor lines that appear to be English, but... elude us,"...


The Book of Repulsive Women
Djuna Barnes
041596931X
Jan 2004
Paperback
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Collected Poems: with Notes Toward the Memoirs of Djuna Barnes
Djuna Barnes
0299212343
November 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Famous for her grim lesbian novel Nightwood (1936) and for her life as a fabulous expatriate in Paris between WWI and WWII, Barnes (1892– 1982) has never enjoyed a reputation as a poet, partly because almost none of her post-Nightwood verse saw print. This diligent and exhaustive edition both restores her hard-to-find magazine verse of the 1910s and 1920s and makes available her dense, sardonic late poems. The early poems are conventional in form, but extreme in emotion. Some focus on same-sex desire; others perform a self-conscious wildness, with disturbing or deadly tableaux—a lady's "profile like a dagger lain/ Between the hair," a "snail that marks the girth of night with slime." The later poetry, as the editors write, "challenges us to savor lines that appear to be English, but... elude us,"...


Enacting Past and Present
Michaela Grobbel
0739107569
Dec 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Through a discussion of Walter Benjamin, Sigmund Freud, Mieke Bal and others, author Michaela Grobbel focuses on the work three women authors as types of performance which lead to re-presentations of memory. These women writers foreground the present but also critically demonstrate the complex relationship of the present to the past. Grobbel's work is a critical addition to any discussion of feminism, memory and literary modernism.


Smoke and Other Early Stories
Djuna Barnes
0641515278

Paperback
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Djuna Barnes
L. Parsons Deborah
0746309449

Paperback
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Ladies Almanack
Djuna Barnes
0814711804
May 1992
Paperback
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Book Review
Djuna Barnes must have had great fun writing and illustrating this book. It's a lively lampoon of her lesbian chums of Left Bank Paris in the 1920s. The main character, Dame Evangeline Musset, is based on the notorious dyke Natalie Barney. Structured as a month-by-month almanac in a style that owes as much to Shakespeare's comedies as to any literature of the intervening centuries, Barnes's book follows the Dame's amorous, often naughty, adventures. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

The Daily Helmsman 11-5-91
"As an 'Almanack,' the book celebrates the uniqueness of women . . . extolling their society with separatist sentiment not violent or radical so much as mirthful and delightful." --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Nightwood
Djuna Barnes
1564780805
August 1995
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
The expatriate Barnes's 1936 novel was a breakthrough both as a work of modernist fiction and for its frank treatment of lesbianism. Although it no doubt raised an eyebrow or two, the original version had actually been toned down by T.S. Eliot. This edition restores much of the deleted material and includes facsimiles of early drafts as well as a scholarly introduction and notes. The best version of Nightwood ever to see print.Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Heather Downey
Written in convoluted and poetic language, Nightwood is an obsessive romance illuminating the demonic and destructive aspects of love. It tells the story of a beautiful young woman, Robin Vote, and Nora and Jenny, the two women who desire her...


Fancy's Craft: Art and Identity in the Early Works of Djuna Barnes
Cheryl J. Plumb
0941664171
February 1987
Hardcover
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Freaks in Late Modernist American Culture: Nathanael West, Djuna Barnes, Tod Browning, and Carson McCullers
Nancy M. Bombaci
0820478326
November 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Freaks in Late Modernist American Culture explores the emergence of what Nancy Bombaci terms "late modernist freakish aesthetics"-a creative fusion of "high" and "low" themes and forms in relation to distorted bodies. Literary and cinematic texts about "freaks" by Nathanael West, Djuna Barnes, Tod Browning, and Carson McCullers subvert and reinvent modern progress narratives in order to challenge high modernist literary and social ideologies. These works are marked by an acceptance of the disteleology, anarchy, and degeneration that racist discourses of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries associated with racial and ethnic outsiders, particularly Jews. In a period of American culture beset with increasing pressures for social and political conformity and with the threat of fascism from Europe, these late...


Ryder
Djuna Barnes
0916583554
Sept 1994
Paperback
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WLW Journal Winter 91
"Barnes dresses the page, as only she can do, in a remarkably flexible array of words, now Elizabethan, now Biblical in tone, shifting in genre from narrative to poetry to drama to parable. Her ability to control the exuberant interaction of these elements produces a text in which women's voices and that ever-so-tricky business of 'female experience' come to the fore fully on their own terms."

Eugene Jolas, transition
"A work of grim, mature beauty . . . she has caught life prismatically in a humor that, I dare say, no women, and few men, have succeeded in giving us."

See all Editorial Reviews


Ladies Almanack
Djuna Barnes
0916583880
Jan 1992
Paperback
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Amazon.com
Djuna Barnes must have had great fun writing and illustrating this book. It's a lively lampoon of her lesbian chums of Left Bank Paris in the 1920s. The main character, Dame Evangeline Musset, is based on the notorious dyke Natalie Barney. Structured as a month-by-month almanac in a style that owes as much to Shakespeare's comedies as to any literature of the intervening centuries, Barnes's book follows the Dame's amorous, often naughty, adventures.

The Daily Helmsman 11-5-91
"As an 'Almanack,' the book celebrates the uniqueness of women . . . extolling their society with separatist sentiment not violent or radical so much as mirthful and delightful."

See all Editorial Reviews


Silence and Power: A Reevaluation of Djuna Barnes
Mary Lynn Broe (Editor)
0809312557
March 1991
Paperback
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