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Elizabeth Bishop: Life and the Memory of It
Brett C. Millier
0520203453
September 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In this first full-length biography of Bishop (1911-1979) Millier provides readers with fresh insights as she traces Bishop's development as a poet from her childhood in Massachusetts and Nova Scotia. Bishop's father's death when she was eight months old was a double cataclysm: as well as taking her father from her, it damaged the mental health of her mother, who was institutionalized for most of the rest of her life. Millier, a professor of American literature and civilization at Middlebury College, stresses how Bishop's virtual orphanhood affected her later life and led her to develop a painful rootlessness. The story of Bishop's early career--her coming-of-age at Vassar College and the mentorship of Marianne Moore--is extraordinarily interesting, as are her better-known relationships with such literary figures...


Elizabeth Bishop
C. K. Doreski
0195079663
May 1993
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
This illuminating study examines Elizabeth Bishop's rhetorical strategies and the way they shape the formal and thematic movements of her poetry and stories. Unlike other recent studies of Bishop, Doreski's does not concern itself primarily with her visual imagery, but rather deals with her
poetry as a series of linguistic strategies designed to create the maximum illusion of representation while resisting the romantic devices of self-revelation and solipsistic narration. Doreski argues that Bishop takes advantage of the inadequacies of language, and with a postmodern sense of
limitation explores the gaps and silences narrative must bridge with the mundane, the patently inadequate, leaving an air of emotional intimacy without committing itself to the banality of full exposure. This study finds the poems and...


Edgar Allan Poe and the Juke-Box: Uncollected Poems, Drafts, and Fragments
Elizabeth Bishop
0374146454
March 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. This book is as much Alice Quinn's as Elizabeth Bishop's. The New Yorker poetry editor spent countless hours with the 3,500 pages of Bishop (1911–1979) material housed in the Vassar College library, and particularly with two notebooks that contain drafts from the period 1936–1948, which, Quinn says in an introduction, furnished the "kernel" of the book. None of the material (aside from "One Art," of which 16 drafts are included as an example of Bishop's exacting process) was marked by Bishop for publication but, as Quinn notes, much of it has been quoted extensively by Bishop scholars. Quinn, who also directs the Poetry Society of America, hopes this volume "will provide an adventure for readers who love the established canon," and it is, indeed, a fan's book. But it also contains...


Elizabeth Bishop
Lorrie Goldensohn
0231076622
Oct 1991
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
As its title implies, this study reads Bishop's poems, books of poems, and the sequence of those books with reference to the poet's life. Starting from an unpublished love poem discovered in a notebook in Brazil, Goldensohn traces Bishop's career with refreshing matter of factness from the perspective of its absent, elided, or elliptically revealed representations of her personal relationships, especially her relationships with women. In part beautifully written, in part repetitive, The Biography of a Poetry quotes drafts of poems and letters that will contribute greatly to understanding Bishop's writing process and art. The book, however, is more valuable for its revelation of new material than for providing fresh insights about the poet or her work. Highly recommended for Bishop scholars and fans.- Cristanne...


The Complete Poems 1927-1979
Elizabeth Bishop
0374518173
April 1984
Paperback
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Book Review
Elizabeth Bishop was vehement about her art--a perfectionist who didn't want to be seen as a "woman poet." In 1977, two years before her death she wrote, "art is art and to separate writings, paintings, musical compositions, etc., into two sexes is to emphasize values in them that are not art." She also deeply distrusted the dominant mode of modern poetry, one practiced with such detached passion by her friend Robert Lowell, the confessional.

Bishop was unforgiving of fashion and limited ways of seeing and feeling, but cast an even more trenchant eye on her own work. One wishes this volume were thicker, though the perfections within mark the rightness of her approach. The poems are sublimely controlled, fraught with word play, fierce moral vision (see her caustic ballad on Ezra Pound,...



Cross and the Switchblade
David Wilkerson
0515090255
November 1986
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
David Wilkerson, a man on a mission, stepped onto some of the world's most dangerous streets armed only with the simple message of God's love and the promise of the Holy Spirit's power. Then the miracles began to happen. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover
The tortured face of a young killer, one of seven boys on trial for a brutal murder, started country preacher David Wilkerson on his lonely crusade to the most dangerous streets in the world. Violent gangs ruled by warlords, drug pushers and pimps held the streets of New York's ghettoes in an iron grip. It was into this world that David Wilkerson stepped, armed only with the simple message of God's love and the promise of the Holy Spirit's power. Then the miracles...


Elizabeth Bishop
Lorrie Goldensohn
0231076630
May 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
As its title implies, this study reads Bishop's poems, books of poems, and the sequence of those books with reference to the poet's life. Starting from an unpublished love poem discovered in a notebook in Brazil, Goldensohn traces Bishop's career with refreshing matter of factness from the perspective of its absent, elided, or elliptically revealed representations of her personal relationships, especially her relationships with women. In part beautifully written, in part repetitive, The Biography of a Poetry quotes drafts of poems and letters that will contribute greatly to understanding Bishop's writing process and art. The book, however, is more valuable for its revelation of new material than for providing fresh insights about the poet or her work. Highly recommended for Bishop scholars and fans.- Cristanne...


Conversations with Elizabeth Bishop
Elizabeth Bishop
0878058729
September 2003
Paperback
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From Booklist
Admirers of Elizabeth Bishop have reveled in One Art (1994), a collection of her letters, and will find much of value in this lively collection of interviews spanning 25 years of the poet's very literary life. Bishop dazzled and enlightened such sophisticated interviewers as Edward Lucie-Smith, Tom Robbins, Anna Quindlen, and David McCullough at various stages in her poetic evolution. She notes that she writes most often about "geography" and animals, identifies her influences--George Herbert, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore--and, an ardent feminist, bristles at being labeled the "greatest feminine poet of the decade" in 1970. Childhood memories surface, as do amusing stories about occupying the Chair of Poetry at the Library of Congress in 1950, living in Brazil, and, of course, reading and...


The Unbeliever
Robert Dale Parker
0252015096
July 1988
Hardcover
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Poetry Handbook
Mary Anne Oliver
0156724006
January 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
This slender guide by Mary Oliver deserves a place on the shelves of any budding poet. In clear, accessible prose, Oliver (winner of both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award for poetry) arms the reader with an understanding of the technical aspects of poetry writing. Her lessons on sound, line (length, meter, breaks), poetic forms (and lack thereof), tone, imagery, and revision are illustrated by a handful of wonderful poems (too bad Oliver was so modest as to not include her own). What could have been a dry account is infused throughout with Oliver's passion for her subject, which she describes as "a kind of possible love affair between something like the heart (that courageous but also shy factory of emotion) and the learned skills of the conscious mind." One comes away from this volume feeling both...


Elizabeth Bishop
Susan McCabe
0271010479
Jan 1994
Hardcover
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Elizabeth Bishop
Susan McCabe
0271025611
May 2004
Paperback
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How to Read A Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry
Edward Hirsch
0156005662
March 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
Edward Hirsch's primer may very well inspire readers to catch the next flight for Houston and sign up for any and all of his courses. Not for nothing does this attentive and adoring poet-teacher title his book How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry; Hirsch's big guide to getting the most out of this form is packed with inspiring examples and thousands of epigrams and allusions. Above all, he is intent on poetry's physical and emotional power. In chapters devoted to the lyric, the narrative, the poetry of sorrow, of ecstasy, of witness, Hirsch continually conveys the sheer ecstasy of this vital act of communication. (He takes us, for instance, with great care and mounting excitement, through Emily Brontë's "Spellbound," which he discovered at age 8 when "baseball season was over for the year.") Above all, there...


White Women Writing White
Renee R. Curry
031331019X
May 2000
Hardcover
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Review
“White Women Writing is an important book for feminist teachers and scholars of women's poetry, and I won't teach these poets again without it.”–NWSA Journal
“...this book, by "shed[ding] a stark light on [the] whiteness" that permeates the study of all things American, may help begin the process of peeling back those cultural accoutrements.”–JASAT

Book Description
Just as the cultural background of readers shapes how they respond to texts, the context in which writers live shapes what they write. This book explores the relationship between three prominent twentieth-century American white women poets and the manifestations of whiteness in their works. The book argues that white women who write do so from within ideological, social, economic,...


Living with Lymphoma: A Patient's Guide
Elizabeth M. Adler
0801881803
September 2005
Paperback
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Review
"It is the most complete explanation of what goes on I've found and is excellent... I highly recommend it." -- Mike Barela, Lymphoma Information Network
"Well-researched guide for lymphoma patients... Adler's personal experiences are integrated into the medical material." -- Library Journal
"It is the most complete explanation of what goes on I've found and is excellent... I highly recommend it for patients, loved ones, and anyone who would like to understand what is lymphoma." -- Mike Barela, Lymphoma Information Network
"A wide range of library holdings will want to make this a basic reference; from public libraries to college health collections." -- Midwest Book Review
"Recommended for larger public and consumer health libraries." -- Eris Weaver, Library Journal Review
"Very highly recommended." --...


Elizabeth Bishop
Manufactured by Chelsea House Publications
0791068137
January 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
Elizabeth Bishop is considered one of the major American poets. She is so meticulous and original that she tends to be both under-read and misread. Examine her work through some of the best literary criticism available on poems such as "The Monument," "Roosters," "At the Fishhouses," "Crusoe in England," and "The End of March." This series is edited by Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of the Humanities, Yale University; Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Professor of English, New York University Graduate School. History’s greatest poets are covered in one series with expert analysis by Harold Bloom and other critics. These texts offer a wealth of information on the poets and their works that are most commonly read in high schools, colleges, and universities.


Exchanging Hats
Elizabeth Bishop
0374150907
Oct 1996
Hardcover
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Book Review
Elizabeth Bishop was a great poet. It turns out that she was also a rather good painter, even though she insisted that her paintings were anything but art. Her visual creations offer intimate and unexpected insights into the magic of familiar places and beloved friends. Exchanging Hats provides both veteran Bishop admirers and those meeting her for the first time with an extraordinary examination of her paintings and drawings.

From Publishers Weekly
It is not widely known that the poet Elizabeth Bishop was also a painter. "From time to time I paint a small gouache or watercolor and give them to friends. They are Not Art?NOT AT ALL," she declared in 1971. Exchanging Hats collects 30 of Bishop's modest, graceful, sometimes primitive images of friends, flowers, landscapes,...


The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry
J. D. McClatchy
1400030935
April 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Poetry devotees will be familiar with much of the work in this fine collection, which focuses on the period from WW II until the present. Sixty-five poets, including such well-known writers as Robert Lowell, Allen Ginsberg, Theodore Roethke, Anne Sexton, James Dickey, Denise Levertov and Gary Snyder, are represented by anywhere from one to a dozen poems each, as well as a brief biography that touches on the writer's aesthetic ideas. McClatchy, himself a poet and critic, has done an exceptional job of selecting works that typify the poets' styles and beliefs. Standouts are Elizabeth Bishop's "In the Waiting Room," about the poet's first perception of herself in relation to others; Randall Jarrell's "The Woman at the Washington Zoo," which deals with the dull, emotionless routine of modern life; Frank O'Hara's...

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