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Kay Boyle: Artist and Activist
Sandra W. Spanier
080931276X
July 1986
Hardcover
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Kay Boyle
Marilyn Elkins
0783800126
Sept 1997
Hardcover
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Book Description
Series Editors: James Nagel, University of Georgia; Zack Bowen, University of Miami and Robert Lecker, McGill University The full range of literary traditions comes to life in the Twayne Critical Essays Series. Volume editors have carefully selected critical essays that represent the full spectrum of controversies, trends, and methodologies relating to each author's work. Essays include writings from the author's native country and abroad, with interpretations from the time they were writing, through the present day. Each volume includes: An introduction providing the reader with a lucid overview of criticism from its beginnings-illuminating controversies, evaluating approaches and sorting out the schools of thought The most influential reviews and the best reprinted scholarly essays A section devoted...


Metamorphosizing the Novel: Kay Boyle's Narrative Innovations
Marilyn Roberson Elkins
0820419478
December 1993
Hardcover
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Life Being the Best and Other Stories
Kay Boyle
0811210537
April 1988
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This book includes 13 of the prolific Boyle's earliest stories, written when she was an American expatriate in Europe during the 1920s and '30s but long out of print. Beginning with the haunting title story, Boyle draws the reader into her characters' strange and yet uncomfortably familiar world, in which every nuance of sadness, frustration and regret is a blow that, once felt, echoes eternally. In "Life Being the Best," a compassionate teacher almost succeeds in freeing Palavicini, a motherless boy, from loneliness, but the youth's pain erupts into violence in the chilling conclusion. Above all, Boyle's intense stories are about the continual quest for love with its inevitable betrayal and loss of innocence. As Coppelia in "The Meeting of the Stones" realizes when she overhears the man she desires flirting with...


Process
Kay Boyle
0252026683
July 2002
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Anything that keeps Boyle--prolific writer, humanitarian, and fascinating human being--before the public eye is worthwhile, but Spanier's discovery of the typescript of Boyle's long-lost first novel is truly significant. In an essay that could serve as an argument for retaining card catalogs, Spanier describes how she came across the "aging index card" in the New York Public Library that led to a forgotten manuscript that Boyle, living in France, had sent to a friend in 1924 and never saw again. Essentially a portrait of the artist as a young woman, Boyle's innovative if tenuous novel blends poetics and politics in a fictionalization of her Cincinnati childhood, during which her family went from riches to rags. The novel stars Kerith Day, an emerging radical close to her open-minded mother, critical of her conservative...


Death of a Man
Kay Boyle
0811210898
April 1989
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Boyle's memorable novel, first published in 1936 and long out of print, and set in the Austrian town of Feldbruck from February to July of 1934, is at once a love story and a chilling political drama. Romance blooms between Prochaska, the resident doctor at the town hospital's ward for infectious diseases, and Pendennis, a young, married American tourist. The attraction between the two is immediate and potent, but as their involvement deepens, Pendennis becomes aware of Prochaska's work for the Nazi party, which many Feldbruck citizens cling to in the hope that it will rescue Austria from economic depression. The lovers' clash is as emphatic as their affinity; as spring wears on, Pendennis's antipathy grows, until she declares to Prochaska that "you take your orders, you swallow it all down along with your pride...


Collected Poems
Kay Boyle
1556590393
July 1991
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Showcasing a poetic career spanning 65 years, this fine volume demonstrates the strength of Boyle's ( This Is Not a Letter and Other Poems ) commitment to a political aesthetic, one that combines a wealth of nuanced knowledge with a genuine liberal spirit. Boyle adopts a number of different voices, often vernacular, setting off opposing viewpoints to fully convey the scope of her themes. Although always attuned to the myriad beauty of existence, the poet never loses sight of the plight of the disenfranchised and the oppressed. Among Boyle's causes are homosexuality ("I speak of it as a thing with a future"), homelessness ("old hags cast up against the wainscoting of Grand Central's ladies' room"), and anti-Semitism (to make a point, she declares, "I have had enough of the Jews, more than enough"). She also pays...


Fifty Stories
Kay Boyle
0811212068
June 1992
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The most complete collection of short stories by the octogenarian author and activist. Copyright 1992 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


Birthday Poems: A Celebration
Jason Shinder (Editor)
1560253452
November 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Everyone has a birthday which they meet with varying levels of joy and ambivalence each year. Birthday Poems, edited by Jason Shinder (Tales from the Couch: Writers on Therapy), underscores this fact with a century's worth of poems by a variety of prominent U.S. writers (from e.e. cummings to John Hollander to June Jordan to Denis Cooper), who celebrate, lament and mull over the meaning of a birthday. A subject index will help readers find poems specific to certain family members or to the age being celebrated. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
Birthday Poems presents an array of more than 100 friendly, wise, affectionate voices including William Carlos Williams, Kay Boyle, Allen Ginsberg, and June Jordan on the subject of birthdays. The...


Blues and Greens: A Produce Worker's Journal

0824822102
July 2000
Hardcover
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From the Inside Flap
"In this sensuous, often witty book, one is struck from the first page onwards with how completely this poet lives a 'life considered.' No one I know writes with more sensitivity about the nature of life and work than Alan Lau, and few poets explore so honestly the nature of living in a community with others who have had to live complex and difficult lives."--Gail Tremblay "Filled with startling images, subtle insights, and true-to-life profundities, this long-awaited volume by this widely known and highly regarded, multifaceted artist will undoubtedly prove to be an event. It will speak to people interested in poetry, Asia, Asian America, the visual arts, multiculturalism, food, produce, sociological issues, commerce, spirituality, and just plain life in general."--Lawson Fusao Inada --This text refers to the...


Blues and Greens: A Produce Worker's Journal
Alan Chong Lau
0824823230
January 2000
Paperback
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From the Inside Flap
"In this sensuous, often witty book, one is struck from the first page onwards with how completely this poet lives a 'life considered.' No one I know writes with more sensitivity about the nature of life and work than Alan Lau, and few poets explore so honestly the nature of living in a community with others who have had to live complex and difficult lives."--Gail Tremblay "Filled with startling images, subtle insights, and true-to-life profundities, this long-awaited volume by this widely known and highly regarded, multifaceted artist will undoubtedly prove to be an event. It will speak to people interested in poetry, Asia, Asian America, the visual arts, multiculturalism, food, produce, sociological issues, commerce, spirituality, and just plain life in general."--Lawson Fusao Inada

...


Paris Year: Dorothy and James T. Farrell, 1931-1932
Edgar Marquess Branch
0821412361
September 1998
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
By the time James T. Farrell set sail for Paris in 1931, Hemingway, Fitzgerald and all the other famous American expatriate writers had left. Sick of the Depression and of his hometown, Chicago, he and his pregnant wife of four days, Dorothy, arrived in Paris on the sly, trying to hide their secret marriage from Dorothy's mother. Farrell's mission was simple: to get published. And after many disappointments (mostly due to censorship concerns because of his explicit prose) the Vanguard Press accepted the first of the Studs Lonigan trilogy, Young Lonigan, on the recommendation of poet Ezra Pound. Branch, a research professor emeritus at Miami University in Ohio, portrays Farrell as a literary outsider trying to make his way in a strange city. There are meetings with Kay Boyle and Padraic Colum, but Farrell is more...

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