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Possession
A. S. Byatt
0679735909
October 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
"Literary critics make natural detectives," says Maud Bailey, heroine of a mystery where the clues lurk in university libraries, old letters, and dusty journals. Together with Roland Michell, a fellow academic and accidental sleuth, Maud discovers a love affair between the two Victorian writers the pair has dedicated their lives to studying: Randolph Ash, a literary great long assumed to be a devoted and faithful husband, and Christabel La Motte, a lesser-known "fairy poetess" and chaste spinster. At first, Roland and Maud's discovery threatens only to alter the direction of their research, but as they unearth the truth about the long-forgotten romance, their involvement becomes increasingly urgent and personal. Desperately concealing their purpose from competing researchers, they embark on a journey that pulls each of them...


Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass
Lewis Carroll
0375761381
Dec 2002
Paperback
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Review
“Only Lewis Carroll has shown us the world upside down as a child sees it, and has made us laugh as children laugh.” —Virginia Woolf

Review
?Only Lewis Carroll has shown us the world upside down as a child sees it, and has made us laugh as children laugh.? ?Virginia Woolf

See all Editorial Reviews


The Arabian Nights: Tales from a Thousand and One Nights
Richard Burton (Translator)
0812972147
June 2004
Mass Market Paperback
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From AudioFile
The romantic strains of Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade introduce and end each segment of this lush, nineteenth-century translation. The exotic music is seamlessly married to Burton's erotic adventures and Madoc's mellifluous voice. Though Madoc's theatrical training is obvious, his renderings are never stagy. He reads with dash and elan but doesn't turn this into a performance by adopting accents. Madoc allows the literature to speak for itself, occasionally underscoring a passage with the seduction of sibilant speech or the slight swell of anger. Please note that Burton's tales, filled with violence and sexuality, are meant for adult ears. R.O.F. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Review
"[A] book...that...


The Little Black Book of Stories
A. S. Byatt
1400075602
February 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
From secret agonies to improper desires and the unthinkable, this slyly titled collection touches on more than a little bit of darkness. Booker Prize–winning author Byatt (Possession) masterfully fuses fantasy with realism in several of these stories, packing a punch with her sometimes witty, sometimes horrifying examinations of faith, art and memory. In the stunning "The Thing in the Wood," two young girls, Penny and Primrose, sent to the countryside during the WWII London blitz, confront the unconscious come to life as a monster ("its expression was neither wrath nor greed, but pure misery.... It was made of rank meat, and decaying vegetation"). They return in middle age to face the Thing again, but Penny, a psychotherapist, doesn't fare as well as Primrose, a children's storyteller. A lapsed Catholic...


A. S. Byatt: Art,Authorship,Creativity
Christien Franken
0333801083
August 2001
Hardcover
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Book Description
This book considers the work of the novelist and critic A.S. Byatt in the context of contemporary debates about art, authorship, creativity, and gender. A.S. Byatt emerges as an author who presents us with fascinating and ambivalent portraits of writers and who uses metaphors of creativity in original ways.


The Mill on the Floss
George Eliot
0141439629
April 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
New chronology and updated further reading.

Edited with an Introduction by A. S. Byatt.


Faust
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
0140449019
Jan 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
Goethe viewed the writing of poetry as essentially autobiographical, and the works selected in this volume represent more than sixty years in the life of the poet. In early poems such as "Prometheus," he rails against religion in an almost ecstatic fervor, while "To the Moon" is an enigmatic meditation on the end of a love affair. The Roman Elegies show Goethe’s use of Classical meters in an homage to ancient Rome and its poets, and "The Diary," suppressed for more than a century, is a narrative poem whose eroticism is combined with its morality. In selections from Faust, arguably his greatest and most personal work, Goethe creates an exhilarating depiction of humankind’s eternal search for truth.

From the Back Cover
"Faithful and felicitous, these verse...


Narrative Desire and Historical Reparations A.S. Byatt, Ian McEwan, and Salman Rushdie
Tim S. Gauthier
0415975417
November 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
This book examines and explains the obsession with history in the contemporary British novel. It frames these "historical" novels as expressions of narrative desire, highlighting the reciprocal relationship between a desire to disclose and to rid ourselves of anxieties elicited by the past. Scrutinizing representative novels from Byatt, McEwan and Rushdie, contemporary fiction is revealed as capable of advocating a viable ethical stance and as a form of authentic commentary. Our anxieties often exist in response to what might be perceived as the oppression or eradication of values, whether this is through the modern repudiation of Victorian principles (Byatt), the Western rethinking of Enlightenment narratives in light of the Holocaust (McEwan), or pluralism threatened by religious fundamentalism (Rushdie). Each of...


Possession
A. S. Byatt
0060527099
Aug 2002
Audio Cassette - Unabridged
·
 
Book Review
"Literary critics make natural detectives," says Maud Bailey, heroine of a mystery where the clues lurk in university libraries, old letters, and dusty journals. Together with Roland Michell, a fellow academic and accidental sleuth, Maud discovers a love affair between the two Victorian writers the pair has dedicated their lives to studying: Randolph Ash, a literary great long assumed to be a devoted and faithful husband, and Christabel La Motte, a lesser-known "fairy poetess" and chaste spinster. At first, Roland and Maud's discovery threatens only to alter the direction of their research, but as they unearth the truth about the long-forgotten romance, their involvement becomes increasingly urgent and personal. Desperately concealing their purpose from competing researchers, they embark on a journey that pulls each of them...


Angels and Insects: Two Novellas
A. S. Byatt
0679751343
March 1994
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Byatt revisits the Victorian landscape of Possession in these two fluid and intricate novellas. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
This work consists of two novellas set in the mid-19th century. The first, "Morpho Eugenia," is a Gothic fable that explores the multiple themes of earthly paradise and Darwin's theories of breeding and sexuality. There is an implied parallel between insect and human society throughout. The hero, a poor, scholarly entomologist, is taken into a wealthy Victorian family. His life and loves, particularly for the daughter Eugenia and the eponymous species of butterfly, comprise this tale. The second novella, "The Conjugal Angel," is reminiscent of Possession ( LJ 11/1/90), Byatt's 1990 Booker Prize winner for...


Essays on the Fiction of A. S. Byatt: Imagining the Real, Vol. 110
Alexa Alfer (Editor)
0313315183
September 2001
Hardcover
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CHOICE
"Highly recommended for general readers and upper-division undergraduates through faculty."

Review
“Highly recommended for general readers and upper-division undergraduates through faculty.”–CHOICE
“...particularly reliable and useful...The essays in this collection push our knowledge of Byatt's ideas and skills a little further in many areas...many Byatt fans will take up the challenge of these scholars and use their work to push our awareness and appreciation of Byatts work even further in the future.”–European Journal of English Studies

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A. S. Byatt
Margaret Reynolds
0099452219
Apr 2004
Paperback
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School Library Journal
“a closer reading of the works, and an individual response by each reader, rather than a dictated criticism.”

Book Description
This guide to the themes, genre and narrative technique of A.S. Byatt texts, Possession, Angels and Insects, Babel Tower. Provides a rich source of ideas for intelligent and inventive ways of approaching the novels.

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Selected Essays, Poems, and Other Writings
George Eliot
0140431489
Feb 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
The works assembled here introduce George Eliot’s incisive views on religion, art, and science, and the nature and purpose of fiction. Essays show her rejecting her earlier religious beliefs, questioning conventional ideas about female virtues and marriage, and setting out theories of idealism and realism that she developed further in her famous novels. Also included are selections from Eliot’s translations of works by Strauss and Feuerbach, excerpts from her poems, and reviews of writers such as Wollstonecraft, Goethe, and Browning. Wonderfully rich in imagery and observations, these pieces reveal the intellectual development of this most rewarding of writers.

About the Author
George Eliot, born Mary Ann Evans (1819–1880), began her literary career as a...


Melusine the Serpent Goddess in A. S. Byatt's Possession and Mythology
Gillian Alban
0739104713
June 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Melusine the Serpent Goddess in Myth and Literature examines how women were once worshipped as the life force, but later suppressed with the introduction of monotheism and a changing attitude regarding the sexes. It connects the literary conception of the Melusine story to myths and legends of the snake or dragon goddess, from ancient to contemporary times.


The Fifth Queen
Ford Madox Ford
0141181303
Sept 1999
Paperback
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Book Description
Now back in print, Ford's highly acclaimed portrait of Henry VIII's controversial fifth Queen

This masterful performance of historical fiction centers on Katharine Howard--clever, beautiful, and outspoken--who catches the jaded eye of Henry VIII and becomes his fifth Queen. Corruption and fear pervade the King's court, and the dimly lit corridors vibrate with the intrigues of unscrupulous courtiers hungry for power. Soon Katharine is locked in a vicious battle with Thomas Cromwell, the Lord Privy Seal, as she fights for political and religious change.

Ford saw the past as an integral part of the present experience and understanding, and his sharply etched vision of the court of Henry VIII--first published in 1908--echoes aspects of Edwardian England as it explores the pervading influence of power, lies,...


Bell
Iris Murdoch
0141186690
November 2001
Paperback
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From AudioFile
It is late 1940s England. Dora Greenfield is an artistic free spirit married at too young an age to a controlling professorial type. On a whim, she leaves him, again, on a whim, she returns to him--and to his temporary home as a researcher in a lay religious community of thoroughly mixed-up people. Miriam Margolyes keeps all the comings and goings perfectly clear in this amusing and acerbic commentary on English society. Margolyes's mellow tones give believable voice to every character, from our heroine Dora to the gruff-voiced local handyman. Her pacing heightens the story's multiple tensions, and her nuanced reading highlights Murdoch's sly social commentary. A.C.S. © AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette ...

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