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So Far From God: A Novel
Ana Castillo
0393326934
June 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Castillo's ( Sapogonia ) inventive but not entirely cohesive novel about the fortunes of a contemporary Chicana family in the village of Tome, N.M., reveals its main concerns at once. Sofi's three-year-old daughter dies in a horrifying epileptic fit but is resurrected (and even levitates) at her own funeral, reporting firsthand acquaintance with hell, purgatory and heaven. Magic and divine intervention in varying ways touch each of Sofi's three other daughters: the eldest, mainstreamed yuppie Esperanza; Caridad, whose path leads toward folk mysticism; and the more mundane Fe, who--seized with a screaming convulsion when her fiance jilts her--is brought to silence only months later through the intercession of the resurrected youngest sister, "Loca." Castillo takes a page from the magical realist school of Latin...


Underdogs
Mariano Azuela
0451526252
May 1996
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
First published in 1915, Azuela's groundbreaking novel about a Mexican peasant who becomes a revolutionary leader is now being issued in a revised translation with a set of illuminating footnotes (notes and revisions by Beth E. Jurgensen). Demetrio Macias is the protagonist who joins the rebels in their efforts to overthrow Mexico's corrupt dictator, Porfirio Diaz, and Macias's brash approach to military tactics speeds his rise through the ranks. His background is articulated by journalist Luis Cervantes, who abandons the government to aid the rebels as he provides background on Macias in the early chapters. While the new general's forces engage in a series of hit-and-run battles with Federal troops, Azuela adds two romantic subplots, one about a difficult young woman named Pintada, who bonds with one of the...


Night Chicas
Hans Neleman
1932026053
Apr 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
Night Chicas is a complex, anthropological tour through a damaged landscape of various Guatemalan prostitutes. Tackling the difficult subject of prostitution with scrutiny and sensitivity, Hans Neleman traveled to Guatemalan brothels to photograph the women and girls who make their livings there. The result is over 200 color photographs, giving us a compassionate portrayal in which Neleman deftly fills the gap between documentary and rigorously staged portraiture, and ultimately restores the human value of these marginalized women. Essays by Ana Castillo, George Pitts, A.D. Coleman and Laura Asturias are featured.


Because I Said So: 33 Mothers Write about Children, Sex, Men, Aging, Faith, Race, and Themselves
Camille Peri (Editor)
0060598794
December 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Moses and Peri, who edited Mothers Who Think, an American Book Award–winning anthology based on a Salon.com column, have gathered some 33 talented mothers (including writers Rosellen Brown, Janet Fitch, Ayelet Waldman and Ann Hulbert, among others) discussing aspects of "real motherhood" today. True, most of their issues—spousal abuse, divorce, cancer, step-parenting, single mothering—aren't new. Some contributors, like Mariane Pearl, the widow of journalist Danny Pearl, have even published their thoughts elsewhere. What's magical about this collection, though, is what happens when such diverse accounts are stitched together in a single volume: a new picture emerges of what it means to be a mother in modern America. Chemo treatments may leave you bald. Your kids may suffer from "KGOY—kids...


de Leon, a Tejano Family History
Carolina Castillo Crimm
0292702167
Feb 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
La familia de León was one of the foundation stones on which Texas was built. Martín de León and his wife Patricia de la Garza left a comfortable life in Mexico for the hardships and uncertainties of the Texas frontier in 1801. Together, they established family ranches in South Texas and, in 1824, the town of Victoria and the de León colony on the Guadalupe River (along with Stephen F. Austin's colony, the only completely successful colonization effort in Texas). They and their descendents survived and prospered under four governments, as the society in which they lived evolved from autocratic to republican and the economy from which they drew their livelihood changed from one of mercantile control to one characterized by capitalistic investments. Combining the storytelling flair of a novelist with...


Watercolor Women / Opaque Men in Verse
Ana Castillo
1931896208
September 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
An epic in verse, the story of Castillo's chicana Everywoman—referred to alternately as "She" and "Ella"—begins life in the rough-and-tumble world of California's migrant farm community. Ella's childhood is spent in los files, or the fields, and she is told early on by Mama Grande that "all men are the same." Rebellious aunt Renata brings her niece to Chicago, where she works a string of blue-collar jobs and attempts to better herself through college classes. After an attempted rape by a biology teacher and harsh words from an art history professor, she trades in college for marriage and baby, but eventually loses interest in her "dutiful husband" and turns to a female cop she meets in a bar. Things sour quickly, but involvement with the "Water Goddess/ Patroness of the Sea/ Governess of the...


Massacre of the Dreamers: Essays on Xicanisma
Ana Castillo
0452274249
September 1995
Paperback
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From Booklist
Castillo, who has earned respect for her novels--most recently, So Far from God --and poetry, here reflects on the place of Mexic Amerindian women and on the need for Xicanisma, a politically active and socially committed Chicana feminism, in national and global policy debates. In ten probing, passionate essays, Castillo explores the roles that women played in the Chicano/Latino Movimiento of the 1960s and 1970s; examines Mexicana activism in the 1986 Watsonville, California, canning strike; posits ancient Mediterranean roots for machismo; analyzes the consequences for women of the moral dualism, repression of sexuality, and fear of death that Catholicism and Communism share; assesses the "poetics of conscientizaci{¢}on"; and argues that eroticism, traditional healing and other forms of...


Because I Said so: 33 Mothers Write about Children, Sex, Men, Aging, Faith, Race, and Themselves
Camille Peri
0060598786
April 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Moses and Peri, who edited Mothers Who Think, an American Book Award–winning anthology based on a Salon.com column, have gathered some 33 talented mothers (including writers Rosellen Brown, Janet Fitch, Ayelet Waldman and Ann Hulbert, among others) discussing aspects of "real motherhood" today. True, most of their issues—spousal abuse, divorce, cancer, step-parenting, single mothering—aren't new. Some contributors, like Mariane Pearl, the widow of journalist Danny Pearl, have even published their thoughts elsewhere. What's magical about this collection, though, is what happens when such diverse accounts are stitched together in a single volume: a new picture emerges of what it means to be a mother in modern America. Chemo treatments may leave you bald. Your kids may suffer from "KGOY—kids...


Postethnic Narrative Criticism: Magicorealism in Oscar Zeta Acosta, Ana Castillo, Julie Dash, Hanif Kureishi, and Salman Rushdie
Frederick Luis Aldama
0292705166
May 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
"In this exciting new book, Frederick Luis Aldama has done an outstanding job of remapping 'magical realism.'" --Werner Sollors, Henry B. and Anne M. Cabot Professor of English Literature and Professor of Afro-American Studies, Harvard University Magical realism has become almost synonymous with Latin American fiction, but this way of representing the layered and often contradictory reality of the topsy-turvy, late-capitalist, globalizing world finds equally vivid expression in U.S. multiethnic and British postcolonial literature and film. Writers and filmmakers such as Oscar "Zeta" Acosta, Ana Castillo, Julie Dash, Hanif Kureishi, and Salman Rushdie have made brilliant use of magical realism to articulate the trauma of dislocation and the legacies of colonialism that people of color experience in the postcolonial,...


Diosa de Las Americas (the Goddess of the Americas): Escritos Sobre la Virgen de Guadalupe (Writings on the Virgin of Guadalupe)
Ana Castillo (Editor)
0375703691
September 2000
Paperback
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Book Description
Una ilustradora colección de escritos en torno al icono más grande de la fe latinoamericana, por algunos de los más importantes escritores latinos contemporáneos.

Santa patrona de México, diosa maternal, protectora divina, el símbolo de la Virgen de Guadalupe ha sido reverenciado en el mundo entero. En esta colección, Ana Castillo ha reunido ensayos originales, escritos históricos, ficción, drama y poesía tan diversos como el modo en que cada individuo celebra a esta poderosa deidad.

Con obras de:
Sandra Cisneros, Clarissa Pinkola Estés, Ph.D., Rosario Ferré, Francisco Goldman, Richard Rodríguez, Elena Poniatowska, y 21 escritores extraordinarios.

Language Notes
Text: Spanish


The Mixquiahuala Letters
Ana Castillo
0385420137
Mar 1992
Paperback
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From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Holly Smith
The table of contents gives three options as to the order in which the forty letters in this epistolary novel may be read: one for the conformist, one for the cynic, and one for the quixotic. With each option a different and powerful story emerges; a book group could have a fascinating discussion about this book if each person chooses her own option. The letters are written by an Indian/Mexican woman from Chicago to her Anglo friend. The two meet in Mexico when they are twenty years old and over the next ten years correspond, visit, and travel together. Through these letters, the stories of their lives emerge: with and without jobs, with and without husbands or boyfriends. These are stories of opposites: one is an artist who is always sketching and can't stand alcohol or cigarettes,...


Sapogonia
Ana Castillo
0385470800
Jan 1994
Paperback
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Review
"A complex, engaging novel...Sapogonia will establish Castillo as one of our finest Chicana novelists." --Rudolfo Anaya

"A writer with enormous integrity, [Castillo is blessed with common sense and lyric sense, the very rarest of gifts." --Clarissa Pinkola Est

Review
"A complex, engaging novel...Sapogonia will establish Castillo as one of our finest Chicana novelists." --Rudolfo Anaya

"A writer with enormous integrity, [Castillo is blessed with common sense and lyric sense, the very rarest of gifts." --Clarissa Pinkola Est

See all Editorial Reviews


Carmen la Coja: Una Novela
Ana Castillo
0375724680
October 2000
Paperback
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Review
"A celebration of life lived to the hilt--. This book will make you laugh and cry at the same time."--Rosario Ferré

"A fiery treatise on losing control in love--. Unforgettable."--Los Angeles Times

"The best of Ana Castillo: sassy, satiric, and stunningly lyrical. Bravo, Ana!"--Julia Alvarez

Review
"A celebration of life lived to the hilt--. This book will make you laugh and cry at the same time."--Rosario Ferré

"A fiery treatise on losing control in love--. Unforgettable."--Los Angeles Times

"The best of Ana Castillo: sassy, satiric, and stunningly lyrical. Bravo, Ana!"--Julia Alvarez

See all Editorial Reviews


Peel My Love Like an Onion
Ana Castillo
038549677X
Sept 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Ana Castillo's voice is one of self-confident, hypnotic melancholy. Peel My Love Like an Onion, her fifth book, often reads like a diary rather than a novel--full of dashed-off midnight eloquence but unformed. It's the story of Carmen Santos, a flamenco dancer whose right leg is shriveled from polio. Her family moved from Mexico to Chicago before she was born: "My first language was Spanish but I am not really Mexican. I guess I am Chicago-Mexican." Castillo sees the immigrant experience as a minefield of ironies. Carmen works at the Domino's in the airport as a way of being a productive American, thus gaining her father's respect. One morning on a "power walk" she realizes that the shoes she is wearing may have been made in a sweatshop by some distant relative from "somewhere... very foreign, like...


De Leon: A Tejano Family History
Ana Carolina Castillo Crimm
0292702205
January 2004
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Description
La familia de León was one of the foundation stones on which Texas was built. Martín de León and his wife Patricia de la Garza left a comfortable life in Mexico for the hardships and uncertainties of the Texas frontier in 1801. Together, they established family ranches in South Texas and, in 1824, the town of Victoria and the de León colony on the Guadalupe River (along with Stephen F. Austin's colony, the only completely successful colonization effort in Texas). They and their descendents survived and prospered under four governments, as the society in which they lived evolved from autocratic to republican and the economy from which they drew their livelihood changed from one of mercantile control to one characterized by capitalistic investments. Combining the storytelling flair of a novelist with...

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