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Caramelo
Sandra Cisneros
0679742581
September 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Caramelo, Sandra Cisneros's first novel since her celebrated The House on Mango Street, weaves a large yet intricate pattern, much like the decorative fringe on a rebozo, the traditional Mexican shawl. Through the eyes of young Celaya, or Lala, the Reyes family saga twists and turns over three generations of truths, half-truths, and outright lies. And, like Celaya's grandmother's prized caramelo (striped) rebozo, so is "the universe a cloth, and all humanity interwoven.... Pull one string and the whole thing comes undone." The Reyes clan, from Awful Grandmother Soledad and her favorite son Inocencio to Celaya, follow their destinies from Mexico City to the U.S. armed forces, jobs upholstering furniture, and to Chicago and San Antonio. Celaya gathers and retells, in over 80 chapters, the stories that reinforce her...


The House on Mango Street
Sandra Cisneros
0679734775
January 1984
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Esperanza Cordero, a girl coming of age in the Hispanic quarter of Chicago, uses poems and stories to express thoughts and emotions about her oppressive environment. (Apr.)no PW reviewCopyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Jesse Larsen
Esperanza and her family didn't always live on Mango Street. Right off she says she can't remember all the houses they've lived in but "the house on Mango Street is ours and we don't have to pay rent to anybody, or share the yard with the people downstairs, or be careful not to make too much noise, and there isn't a landlord banging on the ceiling with a broom. But even so, it's not the house we thought we'd get." Esperanza's childhood life in a Spanish-speaking area of Chicago is described...


La Casa en Mango Street (The House on Mango Street)
Sandra Cisneros
0679755268
October 1994
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
La novela mejor vendida, trata de una niña que crece en una de las comunidades latinas de Chicago-algunas veces le romperá el corazón y otras veces le dará gran alegría-describe un nuevo paisaje americano a través de sus múltiples personajes. -"Una novela profundamente conmovedora . . . Como lo mejor de la poesía, abre las ventanas del corazón sin desperdiciar las palabras." -Miami Herald.

Language Notes
Text: Spanish
Original Language: English

See all Editorial Reviews


The House on Mango Street (SparkNotes)
SparkNotes Editors
1411402561
January 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Esperanza Cordero, a girl coming of age in the Hispanic quarter of Chicago, uses poems and stories to express thoughts and emotions about her oppressive environment. (Apr.)no PW reviewCopyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Jesse Larsen
Esperanza and her family didn't always live on Mango Street. Right off she says she can't remember all the houses they've lived in but "the house on Mango Street is ours and we don't have to pay rent to anybody, or share the yard with the people downstairs, or be careful not to make too much noise, and there isn't a landlord banging on the ceiling with a broom. But even so, it's not the house we thought we'd get." Esperanza's childhood...


Caramelo
Read by Sandra Cisneros
0641706006

Audio
·
 


Caramelo
Sandra Cisneros
0060515910
Oct 2002
Audio Cassette - Unabridged
·
 
Book Review
Caramelo, Sandra Cisneros's first novel since her celebrated The House on Mango Street, weaves a large yet intricate pattern, much like the decorative fringe on a rebozo, the traditional Mexican shawl. Through the eyes of young Celaya, or Lala, the Reyes family saga twists and turns over three generations of truths, half-truths, and outright lies. And, like Celaya's grandmother's prized caramelo (striped) rebozo, so is "the universe a cloth, and all humanity interwoven.... Pull one string and the whole thing comes undone." The Reyes clan, from Awful Grandmother Soledad and her favorite son Inocencio to Celaya, follow their destinies from Mexico City to the U.S. armed forces, jobs upholstering furniture, and to Chicago and San Antonio. Celaya gathers and retells, in over 80 chapters, the stories that reinforce her...


Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories
Sandra Cisneros
0679738568
March 1992
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In these lyrical prose passages, Mexican American women of San Antonio, Tex., muse on their loyalty to Mexico, their lovers and their sense of self-worth. Author tour. Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
In this collection of Mexican-American stories, Cisneros addresses the reader in a voice that is alternately buoyant, strong, funny, and sad. The brief vignettes of the opening piece, "My Lucy Friend Who Smells Like Corn," are tiles in a mosaic. Taken together, these vignettes give a vivid, colorful picture of life on the Texas/Mexico border. Family ties are strong: aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents are all present. The stories are often about the romantic dreams of young girls longing to escape stifling small-town life who discover that...


The House on Mango Street
Sandra Cisneros
0072435178
June 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Esperanza Cordero, a girl coming of age in the Hispanic quarter of Chicago, uses poems and stories to express thoughts and emotions about her oppressive environment. (Apr.)no PW reviewCopyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Jesse Larsen
Esperanza and her family didn't always live on Mango Street. Right off she says she can't remember all the houses they've lived in but "the house on Mango Street is ours and we don't have to pay rent to anybody, or share the yard with the people downstairs, or be careful not to make too much noise, and there isn't a landlord banging on the ceiling with a broom. But even so, it's not the house we thought we'd get." Esperanza's childhood...


Hairs/Pelitos
Sandra Cisneros
0679890076
November 1997
Paperback
·
 
Review
"This exuberant bilingual picture book, with eye-catching artwork, is an affectionate picture of familial love and a cozy bedtime book."--The Horn Book.  

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"Un mini-diccionario &#250til para lectores principiantes de los dos idiomas." -- School Library Journal

Review
"This exuberant bilingual picture book, with eye-catching artwork, is an affectionate picture of familial love and a cozy bedtime book."--The Horn Book.  

-----------
"Un mini-diccionario útil para lectores principiantes de los dos idiomas." -- School Library Journal

See all Editorial Reviews


Arroyo de La Llorona y Otros Cuentos (Woman Hollering Creek)
Sandra Cisneros
061304519X
Sept 1996
(Hardcover) - Spanish
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From Library Journal
A little girl revealing secrets as only a child can; a witch flies at dawn over a small town?these are just two of the scenarios presented by Cisneros in this collection of short stories. A writer of vivid imagination, with a very acute sense of mysticism and a witty poetic style, Cisneros not only entertains but leaves a lasting impression. A key work from a major Hispanic American writer; recommended for public libraries.?Jose M. FornesCopyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description
The highly acclaimed short story collection by the author of The House on Mango Street is now available in a Spanish edition. El arroyo de La Llorana brings to life an astonishing array of characters and, like La casa en...


La Casa en Mango Street (The House on Mango Street)
Sandra Cisneros
073932280X
August 2005
Compact Disc
·
 
Book Description
La novela mejor vendida, trata de una niña que crece en una de las comunidades latinas de Chicago-algunas veces le romperá el corazón y otras veces le dará gran alegría-describe un nuevo paisaje americano a través de sus múltiples personajes. -"Una novela profundamente conmovedora . . . Como lo mejor de la poesía, abre las ventanas del corazón sin desperdiciar las palabras." -Miami Herald. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Language Notes
Text: Spanish
Original Language: English --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


The House on Mango Street
Sandra Cisneros
0739322796
August 2005
Compact Disc
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Esperanza Cordero, a girl coming of age in the Hispanic quarter of Chicago, uses poems and stories to express thoughts and emotions about her oppressive environment. (Apr.)no PW reviewCopyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Jesse Larsen
Esperanza and her family didn't always live on Mango Street. Right off she says she can't remember all the houses they've lived in but "the house on Mango Street is ours and we don't have to pay rent to anybody, or share the yard with the people downstairs, or be careful not to make too much noise, and there isn't a landlord banging on the ceiling with a broom. But even so, it's not the house we thought we'd get." Esperanza's childhood...


Casa En Mango Street (House on Mango Street)
Sandra Cisneros
0613046889
Oct 1994
(Hardcover) - Spanish
·
 
Book Description
La novela mejor vendida, trata de una niña que crece en una de las comunidades latinas de Chicago-algunas veces le romperá el corazón y otras veces le dará gran alegría-describe un nuevo paisaje americano a través de sus múltiples personajes. -"Una novela profundamente conmovedora . . . Como lo mejor de la poesía, abre las ventanas del corazón sin desperdiciar las palabras." -Miami Herald. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Language Notes
Text: Spanish
Original Language: English --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


El amante turco
Esmeralda Santiago
1594376476
October 2005
Paperback
·
 


Pelitos / Hairs
Sandra Cisneros
0613051165
Nov 1997
(Hardcover) - Spanish
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
"Everybody in our family has different hair"/ "Todos en nuestra familia tenemos pelo diferente," begins this rhythmic, bilingual picture book taken from acclaimed novelist/short-story writer Cisneros's The House on Mango Street. Yba?ez expands upon the diversity theme by rendering the family members in a variety of unusual skin tones as well as with distinctive hairstyles. Purple-faced Papa has hair "like a broom,/ all up in the air," while Nettie's "slippery" orange hair contrasts vividly with her blue skin. The narrator waxes lyrical on the subject of Mama's hair: "sweet to put your nose into when she is holding you, holding you and you feel safe, [it] is the warm smell of bread before you bake it." Each spread is framed by bright borders ornamented with everyday objects-shoes and bikes; steaming cups of...

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