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Love, Amy: The Selected Letters of Amy Clampitt
Amy Clampitt
0231132867
June 2005
Hardcover
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From The New Yorker
Composed over a forty-four year period, Clampitt's letters are written in a markedly different voice from that of her intricate, highly learned poems. Here we get her recipe for granola, her thoughts on proper attire for Manhattan parties ("Being underdressed is the best way of keeping one's perspective"), and her complaints about literary types ("miserable") and "Paradise Lost" ("dull and pompous"). Clampitt achieved recognition for her writing late in life, and it is fascinating to learn of the many things she was doing before then, such as getting jailed for participating in political protests. Her letters are suffused with an inexorable optimism, devoid of any tinge of writerly melancholy or self-pity. At the age of thirty-three, Clampitt wrote to her youngest...


How Poets See the World
Willard Spiegelman
0195174917
June 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Although readers of prose fiction sometimes find descriptive passages superfluous or boring, description itself is often the most important aspect of a poem. This book examines how a variety of contemporary poets use description in their work.
Description has been the great burden of poetry. How do poets see the world? How do they look at it? What do they look for? Is description an end in itself, or a means of expressing desire? Ezra Pound demanded that a poem should represent the external world as objectively and directly as possible,
and William Butler Yeats, in his introduction to The Oxford Book of Modern Verse (1936), said that he and his generation were rebelling against, inter alia, "irrelevant descriptions of nature" in the work of their predecessors. The poets in this book, however, who are distinct...


Collected Poems of Amy Clampitt
Amy Clampitt
0375700641
March 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
"If Gerard Hopkins and Marianne Moore, those two uniquenesses, had married each other, they might have borne Amy Clampitt," says poet Mona Van Duyn. Certainly Hopkins's capacity for sprung rhythms wrapped around an awestruck wonder at the world seems to mesh, in Clampitt's poems, with Moore's genius for linguistic playfulness and depth of detail. Clampitt's ear is nearly unparalleled in 20th-century poets, and her delight in specificity richly rewards readers' attention. The Collected Poems of Amy Clampitt brings together a lifetime of good work, and is one to treasure. Consider this excerpt from the traveling poem "Losing Track of Language": "The train leaps toward Italy; words fall away / through the dark into the dark bedroom / of everything left behind, the unendingness / of...


Predecessors,Et Cetera
Amy Clampitt
0472064576
September 1991
Paperback
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Book Description
Reflecting on her poetic predecessors and contemporaries, Amy Clampitt reveals the many connections in their craft


The Day Underneath the Day
C. Dale Young
0810151111
April 2001
Paperback
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Carl Phillips
"These are poems of formal grace and slant homage, map-and-dazzle, a vision as lush as...refreshingly exacting."

Review
"The Day Underneath the Day is very much a book of inquiry: how do we negotiate safe passage over the mare incognita that is variously art and the making of it, the body and the mystery of it, identity both inherited and imposed? These are poems of formal grace and slant homage, map-and-dazzle, a vision as lush as it is-refreshingly-exacting." -Carl Phillips


After Ovid: New Metamorphoses
Michael Hofmann
0374524785
April 1996
Paperback
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From Library Journal
The editors commissioned 42 poets from America, Australia, Great Britain, Ireland, and New Zealand to "translate, reinterpret, reflect on, or completely reimagine" Ovid's famous Metamorphoses. What results are updated versions of the classic history of transformations of humans and inanimate objects. In these versions, which are not literal translations but adaptations utilizing characters and themes from the original, the sophisticated hexameters and great length (over 12,000 lines) of Ovid's masterpiece give way to fable-narratives in widely varying free verse and rhymed modernist rhythms. There are brief, insightful commentaries and long, stylistic imitations. Ovid's worldliness, use of shock, unorthodox emphasis on extremes of psychological behavior, and, as the editors observe, "distinct cinematic qualities"...


American Writers: Supplement IX
Manufactured by Gale Group
0684806487
November 2001
Hardcover
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From Booklist
Eighteen more writers are added to the literary canon as defined by this important series, including Nelson Algren, Tony Kushner, and Dorothy Parker. RBB
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review
Online : "These two volumes are the beginnings of new series in the well-known Scribner Writers Series. Rather than concentrate on authors, these two sets will concentrate on famous works -- many of which are required reading in high schools. The table of contents for each volume will help the selector decide if the set is worthy of purchase. For each work, the volume contains a biographical essay of the author, a long critical essay weaving analysis and summary -- heavy on the former -- and a select bibliography. The reading level...


Cross-Pollinations (The Credo Series): The Marriage of Science and Poetry
Gary Paul Nabhan
1571312706
February 2004
Paperback
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From Booklist
Literary ethnobotanist Nabhan, a captivating storyteller in command of complex ecological thought, appeals to both our intellect and our imagination in his groundbreaking books, which include Coming Home to Eat (2002). In his latest thoughtful rumination, a contribution to the worthy Credo series that also includes Rick Bass, Alison Hawthorne Deming, and William Kittredge, Nabhan offers a fresh and stimulating analysis of the crucial role cross-pollination plays both in nature and in human endeavors. Drawing on such personal experiences as his own color-blindness to reveal how an unexpected "perceptual shift" can lead to new understanding, he recounts how an attentive reading of an O'odham song-poem about the profound relationship between the sacred datura and the hawkmoth yielded invaluable scientific knowledge,...


Desperate Measures
William Logan
0813025621
November 2002
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Despite his five collections of poetry, William Logan remains best-known as a strong-willed reviewer; his determined attacks-and his carefully crafted praise-turn up regularly in Parnassus, the New Criterion and the Washington Post. Logan's third collection of reviews and essays, Desperate Measures, finds his well-turned, sharpened sentences in fine form. Logan (a professor at the University of Florida) proffers careful appreciations of Frost, Geoffrey Hill, Robert Lowell and several minor masters of inherited forms (Edgar Bowers, J. V. Cunningham), but also blasts away at Ashbery, Bly, Merwin, Les Murray, Jorie Graham and other contemporary targets.Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Kirkus Reviews
"The preeminent poet-critic of his generation."


The Golden Ecco Anthology
Mark Strand
0880014334
April 2000
Paperback
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About the Author

Mark Strand is the author of nine books of poems. His most recent works include Dark Harbor, a collection of poems, and Hopper, a book on the American Artist Edward Hopper, part of Ecco's Writers on Art Series. In 1990 he was chosen by the Librarian of Congress to be Poet Laureate of the United States. He lives in Baltimore with his wife and son.


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