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The Boy Who Didn't Believe in Spring
Lucille Clifton
0140547398
Aug 1992
Paperback
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Card catalog description
Two skeptical city boys set out to find spring which they've heard is "just around the corner." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Palm of My Heart: Poetry by African American Children
Davida Adedjouma (Editor)
1880000768
May 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
When children give voice to their own feelings, the result can be magical. This touching and inspiring collection of poems by African-American children helps prove that point. Edited by Davida Adedjouma and lovingly illustrated by Gregory Christie, these 20 poems came out of a series of writing workshops with children who were encouraged to celebrate their lives, joys, influences and hopes. The results are pure poetry, honest, wise and encouraging: "Black is the color of some people/but people are different/differences are good because/no one else says the/same things as you." Not only will children find the poems interesting, they may just be inspired to explore their own feelings. All ages. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From School Library Journal
...


Lucille Clifton
Mary Jane Lupton
0275984699
June 2006
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Writing and composing with honesty and humanism, Lucille Clifton is known for her themes of the body, family, community, politics, womanhood, and the spirit. While much of her work deals with the African American experience, she does not limit herself to that perspective, addressing topics common to all women, to all people. This timely and important biography will give readers a glimpse into the life and work of this important and revered African American poet, writer, and educator, exploring themes that run throughout her writing, as well as the personal obstacles she faced and overcame.

About the Author
MARY JANE LUPTON is Professor Emeritus at Morgan State University. She is the author of numerous essays in the areas of feminism, Indian Studies, and Black Studies. She is...


Poetry 180: A Turning Back to Poetry: An Anthology of Contemporary Poems
Billy Collins
0812968875
March 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
A dazzling new anthology of 180 contemporary poems, selected and introduced by America’s Poet Laureate, Billy Collins.

Inspired by Billy Collins’s poem-a-day program with the Library of Congress, Poetry 180 is the perfect anthology for readers who appreciate engaging, thoughtful poems that are an immediate pleasure.

A 180-degree turn implies a turning back—in this case, to poetry. A collection of 180 poems by the most exciting poets at work today, Poetry 180 represents the richness and diversity of the form, and is designed to beckon readers with a selection of poems that are impossible not to love at first glance. Open the anthology to any page and discover a new poem to cherish, or savor all the poems, one at a time, to feel the full measure of contemporary poetry’s vibrance and...


The Times They Used to Be
Lucille Clifton
0440418674
Aug 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
This is the story "of what happened to Tassie Scott / the time sin broke all out in her body / because she wasn't saved. / And also about me, / and how it was / the summer my uncle Sunny / followed the nun / back and forth / across the Grider Street bridge." It is 1948 and 12-year-old Sooky and her best friend Tassie entertain themselves by taking walks over to the white folks' section of town to look in their windows, sitting on the curb by the bus stop to wait for the first lights to come on at dusk, and listening to Amos and Andy on the radio. Sooky's Uncle Sunny, "most probably / just shell-shocked / from the war / with the 92d Division," catches sight of a nun-ghost one evening, and fixates on the apparition for the remainder of his short life. Meanwhile Sooky and Tassie have the specter of adolescence to...


The Lucky Stone
Lucille Clifton
0440451108
May 1986
Paperback
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Book Description
There is nothing Tee enjoys more than sitting out on the porch with her great-greatmother, listening to the fascinating stories about the lucky stone.



Shiny and black as night, it brought good fortune to each of its owners for over one hundred years. First it helped Mandy, a runaway slave, win her freedom. Then it saved Vashti from death by lightning at a prayer meeting. And it even saved Tee's great-grandmother from the ferocious dancing dog and helped her meet her husband.



Now Tee can't help wondering what the old stone has in store for her. She certainly could use some luck on Valentine's Day. But the lucky stone doesn't belong to Tee. How can her wish come true?

Card catalog description
A lucky stone provides good fortune for its various...


Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems, 1988-2000
Lucille Clifton
1880238888
April 2000
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Clifton's poems owe a great deal to oral tradition. Her work is wonderfully musical and benefits greatly from being read aloud: "It is hard to remain human on a day/ when birds perch weeping/ in the trees and the squirrel eyes/ do not look away but the dog ones do/ in pity." Her keen sense of rhythm, of the sound, tone, and texture of words, is delightful, a rare find in this day and age. The language is crystal clear and deceptively accessible. The poems are personal, but the distant thunder of history rumbles behind every line. As she says on seeing a photograph: "is it the cut glass/ of their eyes/ looking up toward/ the new gnarled branch/ of the black man/ hanging from a tree?" Clifton's work hearkens back to the days of the Black Arts Movement and sheds light on the new black aesthetic. These are economical...


El Ni~no Que No Creia En La Primavera
Lucille Clifton
0613055993
July 1996
(Hardcover) - Spanish
·
 


Book of Light
Lucille Clifton
1556590520
February 1993
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Clifton's ( Quilting ) latest collection clearly demonstrates why she was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. These poems contain all the simplicity and grace readers have come to expect from her work. The first few pages set the title in a larger perspective at the same time that they announce the book's premise: "woman, i am / lucille, which stands for light." This is a feminist version of Roots , charged with outrage at the sins done to women of previous generations. There are the typical heroes and anti-heroes: Atlas, Sisyphus, Leda, biblical women--but even these tired figures are given a new, often comic, twist: Naomi, for example, doesn't want Ruth's devotion, just to be left alone to "grieve in peace"; several poems are addressed to Clark Kent as the speaker comes to terms with the realization that he...


The Palm of My Heart
Davida Adedjouma
0613110285
Oct 1998
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
When children give voice to their own feelings, the result can be magical. This touching and inspiring collection of poems by African-American children helps prove that point. Edited by Davida Adedjouma and lovingly illustrated by Gregory Christie, these 20 poems came out of a series of writing workshops with children who were encouraged to celebrate their lives, joys, influences and hopes. The results are pure poetry, honest, wise and encouraging: "Black is the color of some people/but people are different/differences are good because/no one else says the/same things as you." Not only will children find the poems interesting, they may just be inspired to explore their own feelings. All ages. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From School Library Journal
...


Wild Blessings (Southern Literary Studies): The Poetry of Lucille Clifton
Hilary Holladay
0807129879
November 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Widely acclaimed for her powerful explorations of race, womanhood, spirituality, and mortality, poet Lucille Clifton has published ten volumes of poems since 1969 and has received numerous accolades for her work, including the 2000 National Book Award for Blessing the Boats. Her verse is featured in almost every anthology of contemporary poetry, and her readings draw large and enthusiastic audiences. Although Clifton’s poetry is a pleasure to read, it is neither as simple nor as blithely celebratory as readers sometimes assume. The bursts of joy found in her polished, elegant lines are frequently set against a backdrop of regret and sorrow. Alternately consoling, stimulating, and emotionally devastating, Clifton’s poems are unforgettable. In Wild Blessings, Hilary Holladay offers the first full-length...


Everett Anderson's Christmas Coming
Lucille Clifton
078572091X
Oct 1993
Hardcover
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Review
"New illustrations bring vibrant color to the joyous yet sometimes poignant verses that encapsulate the small boy's mounting anticipation and his ultimate satisfaction on the festive day."--The Horn Book "Clifton's rhythmic verse describes how Christmas comes to Everett Anderson, the boy in 14A. Festively illustrated in full color, the new edition features gouache paintings, softly shaded with pastels in deep hues....A welcome new edition of an old favorite, this fairly glows with the joy of the season."--Booklist --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
Only five more days till Christmas! As each day goes by, Everett is more excited. He loves listening to the carolers, watching snow fall from this fourteenth-floor window, and decorating the Christmas...


Good Woman: Poems and a Memoir, 1969-1980
Lucille Clifton
0918526590
November 1987
Paperback
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Book Review
My favorite book, this is a must-have poetry collection for both poetry lovers and those who like to think but aren't comfortable with the density of some contemporary poetry. Clifton, as always, uses language that is accessible to craft situations real and vital to her readers. The section "Some Jesus" probes the emotions of plain folks faced with miracles; "Good Times" takes its own snapshots of family in days past; "I Agree with the Leaves" explores the curious and troubling realms of spirituality and the quest for "place" in the cosmos. Good Woman is a fine companion to Clifton's most recent book The Terrible Stories.

Book Description
large volume of poems plus a personal memoir

See all Editorial...


Mercy
Lucille Clifton
1929918550
September 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
With numerous awards and publication credits under her belt, Lucille Clifton has more than proven her worth over a long poetic career. In her twelfth collection, Clifton again showcases her gifts of a musical ear attuned to everyday language, a Zen-like minimalism of form and sentence structure, and keen perception that sees beyond obvious realities to a deeply spiritual realm. From the wreckage of what is lost in life to such forces as cancer and terrorism, to the redemption of what remains, like birth and otherworldly assistance, Clifton's voice speaks truth and sings hope. One can see a bit of Dickinson here, as well as Gwendolyn Brooks. And in the last section of Mercy, "The Message from the Ones" (a kind of angelic channeling), there is poignancy akin to Rilke's Duino Elegies. Clifton is a poet who...


Everett Anderson's Goodbye
Lucille Clifton
0805002359
Aug 1983
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The death of Everett Anderson's father brings to a close this empathetic series of verse stories that express universal heartaches and small moments of hope. A Reading Rainbow selection. Ages 5-8. Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review
"A simple, poetic telling of Everett Anderson's feelings as he copes with and accepts the fact of his father's death."--Childhood Education

"The poetry expresses simply but powerfully Everett's emotions, as well as his mother's quiet, understanding support...Grifalconi's superb drawings convey as much meaning as Clifton's empathetic lines in a book that is aesthetically satisfying and an effective way of helping children come to terms with...


Everett Anderson's Goodbye
Lucille Clifton
0805008004
July 1988
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The death of Everett Anderson's father brings to a close this empathetic series of verse stories that express universal heartaches and small moments of hope. A Reading Rainbow selection. Ages 5-8. Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review
"A simple, poetic telling of Everett Anderson's feelings as he copes with and accepts the fact of his father's death."--Childhood Education

"The poetry expresses simply but powerfully Everett's emotions, as well as his mother's quiet, understanding support....Grifalconi's superb drawings convey as much meaning as Clifton's empathetic lines in a book that is aesthetically satisfying and an effective way of helping children come to terms with loss."--Publishers Weekly

"Simple in concept yet universal...


Mercy ( American Poets Continum Series, No. 86)
Lucille Clifton
1929918542
September 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
With numerous awards and publication credits under her belt, Lucille Clifton has more than proven her worth over a long poetic career. In her twelfth collection, Clifton again showcases her gifts of a musical ear attuned to everyday language, a Zen-like minimalism of form and sentence structure, and keen perception that sees beyond obvious realities to a deeply spiritual realm. From the wreckage of what is lost in life to such forces as cancer and terrorism, to the redemption of what remains, like birth and otherworldly assistance, Clifton's voice speaks truth and sings hope. One can see a bit of Dickinson here, as well as Gwendolyn Brooks. And in the last section of Mercy, "The Message from the Ones" (a kind of angelic channeling), there is poignancy akin to Rilke's Duino Elegies. Clifton is a poet who...


Terrible Stories
Lucille Clifton
1880238373
September 1996
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In a long career, Clifton has earned that rare combination of critical acclaim (including two Pulitzer Prize nominations) and a wide popular audience. Heir to Langston Hughes's deceptively ordinary voice, Clifton crafts brief lines and accessible metaphors into a profound and often humorous commentary on the rich survival skills of women, family love and contemporary American?particularly African American?life. Her cogent 10th collection charts a treacherous terrain of personal and historic tragedy. She confronts breast cancer with an impressive delicacy, as in "scar": "I will call you/ ribbon of hunger/ and desire/ empty pocket flap/ edge of before and after.// and you/ what will you call me?" A poetic sequence called "A Term in Memphis" penetrates Southern history, allowing the revelations of honest anger to...


One of the Problems of Everett Anderson
Lucille Clifton
0805052011
Sept 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
One of the Problems of Everett Anderson, the eighth by Lucille Clifton, illus. by Ann Grifalconi, gently and sensitively addresses the issue of child abuse. After Everett notices bruises and scars on his new friend, Greg, he doesn't know what to do. "I could tell the teacher," he says. "[But] I don't want to make it bad for Greg or for his mom and dad." Finally, Everett tells his mother, who helps Everett "to understand that one of the things he can do right now is listen to Greg and hug and hold his friend." Grifalconi's muted illustrations poignantly evoke the fear and uncertainty of the situation. An excellent choice for opening up a challenging conversation. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Everett's new friend Greg...

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