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A Bio-Bibliography of Countee P. Cullen, 1903-1946., Vol. 8
Margaret Perry
0837133254
August 1970
Hardcover
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Book Description
A long essay on "The Man and His Poetry" plus extensive bibliography of Cullen's major writings, writings about Cullen, including newspaper references, and poetry anthologies in which Cullen's work appeared.


The Oxford Anthology of African American Poetry
Arnold Rampersad (Editor)
0195125630
October 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
If daring and argument forge identity, Stanford professor Rampersad (Life of Langston Hughes) has succeeded in "allowing black poets to create with their own words a portrait of the African-American people." Neither consonant nor cautious, the diversity of the anthology's subject matter is trumped only by its poetic range: Amiri Baraka's and Sonia Sanchez's experimentation vibrate against the classic lyrics of Langston Hughes and Gwendolyn Brooks, mixing visions and trading trials. The anthology, arranged by theme rather than author or time period, simultaneously grounds and sets the reader adrift in a terrain stretching from the American South to Africa, from the contemporary back to slavery. And yet, as Eugene B. Redmond counsels in "Highflown: Love," these poems speak of "A power that cannot be seen / Heard /...


Caroling Dusk: An Anthology of Verse by Black Poets of the Twenties
Countee Cullen (Editor)
0806513497
January 1993
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Long out of print, this anthology--featuring work by figures such as W.E.B. DuBois and Langston Hughes--includes poignant biographical notes written for the most part by the poets themselves. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
This selection from the work of thirty-eight poets was made by Countee Cullen in 1927. His stated purpose at the time was to bring together a miscellany of deeply appreciated but scattered verse. Beginning with the work of Paul Laurence Dunbar, who, though there were black poets before him, is generally credited as the first black poet to make a deep impression on the literary world, the book includes the writings of James Weldon Johnson, W. E. B. Du Bois, Jessie Faucet, Sterling A. Brown, Arna Bontemps, Langston Hughes,...


Color
Countee Cullen
0881431559
June 1993
Paperback
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African-American Poets: Phillis Wheatley through Countee Cullen
Harold Bloom (Editor)
0791063321
December 2001
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 9 Up-This tome is not for the faint of heart, because any reading of literary criticism of this type requires a special maturity, a particular knowledge base, and high interest, making it especially unsuited for average high school students. It can, however, be a wonderful text for honors or AP English literature classes. This narrow audience is in no way a reflection on the quality of the essays and the issues and questions they raise. Still, a book like this, to be completely useful, needs an audience with enough background to be able to agree or disagree with the theoretical perspective presented.Carol Jones Collins, Columbia High School, Maplewood, NJCopyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
This volume focuses on the principal...


The Entrance Place of Wonders
Daphne Muse
0810959976
November 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 2-6–Twenty poems written during the Harlem Renaissance are perfectly paired with exuberant oil paintings. Familiar poets such as Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, and Claude McKay are joined by less immediately recognized names such as Effie Lee Newsome, Dorothy Vena Johnson, and Gladys May Caseley-Hayford. Their collective work, firmly grounded in this exciting explosion of African-American culture, affirms the joy of life and of personal growth and discovery. Madeline G. Allisons Children of the Sun reminds youngsters that God in his Wisdom gave you hue/Of which Hes proud–yes, proud of you! Some selections brim with hope, such as Langston Hughess To You. To dream of vast horizons of the soul/Through dreams made whole,/Unfettered free–help me! and Georgia Douglas...


Pride and Promise: The Harlem Renaissance
Kathryn T. Cryan-Hicks
1878668307
March 1997
Paperback
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Afro-American Poetics: Revisions of Harlem and the Black Aesthetic
Houston A. Baker
0299115046
February 1996
Paperback
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Black like Us: A Century of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual African American Fiction
Devon W. Carbado (Editor)
1573441082
May 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
One result of the combined American prejudice against both blacks and sexual minorities is that as these voices finally come to light, they seem astonishingly new. The words of Alice Dunbar Nelson or Angelina Welde Grimke, both of whom wrote at the turn of the twentieth century, are as fresh to us as the novels of E. Lynn Harris. This groundbreaking and beautifully crafted anthology--a graduate seminar in a single volume--reveals a hidden tradition, no less powerful for being filtered quietly from writer to writer, sometimes between the lines of published stories or novels. All the writers you would expect are gathered here--Langston Hughes (represented by his incomparable story, "Blessed Assurance," posthumously published in 1963), Countee Cullen, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde--beside scores of lesser-known figures. Many of...


Chapters into Verse: A Selection of Poetry in English Inspired by the Bible from Genesis through Revelation
Robert Atwan (Editor)
0195136764
September 2000
Paperback
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Book Description
Drawing a unique map of the history of English poetry, Chapters Into Verse surveys and defines the literary legacy of the Scriptures from the fourteenth century to the present. Arranged in scriptural order from Genesis to Revelation, the book presents each poem alongside the biblical passage
that inspired it. Thus readers can conveniently witness the various ways sacred text has sparked the imagination of poets throughout the ages. The editors have included poems by virtually all the prominent religious poets--among them John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, Edward Taylor, and
Gerard Manley Hopkins. Included, too, are devotional and visionary works from a wide range of vintage poets--Robert Burns, William Blake, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Christina Rossetti, Alfred Tennyson, and Robert Browning....


Crisis Reader: Stories, Poetry, and Essays from the NAACP's Crisis Magazine
Sondra Kathryn Katherine Wilson (Editor)
0375752315
February 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
When the towering African American intellectual W.E.B. Du Bois helped found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1909, he also launched a magazine as a literary extension of the organization. The Crisis: A Record of the Darker Races was first published in 1910, articulating the social, political, and economic concerns of blacks on a national and international scale--and showcasing many Afro-American writers, playwrights, and intellectuals who later became household names. This collection--drawn mostly from material published in the 1920s--contains the race-examining fiction of Charles Chestnutt and Jessie Fauset; an early personal essay on racial relations from sociologist E. Franklin Frazier; Du Bois and philosopher Alain Locke's critique "The Younger Negro Movement"; and "The Work of a Mob," by...

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