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The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
American Heritage Editors
0395825172
January 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
The latest edition of the American Heritage Dictionary is out, and that's hot news--not just for the resolute followers of lexicographical minutiae, but for the general reading and writing public as well. Why? Because the American Heritage is a long-standing favorite family dictionary (never underestimate the value of pictures) and one of the prime dictionary references for magazines, newspapers, and dot.com content providers. For scads of writers and editors across the U.S., it sets the standard on matters of style and lexicographical authority.

So this new edition is exciting and noteworthy, but how good is it? In its favor, the fourth edition is as current a dictionary as you can get. It's six years fresher than the 1994 version, with 10,000 words and definitions you won't find in the still venerable but now slightly...



Through the Ivory Gate
Rita Dove
0613235185
Oct 1993
Hardcover
·
 
From Kirkus Reviews
A Pulitzer Prize-winning poet (1987) occasionally gives her gift free rein in this somewhat mechanically rendered first novel- -about a young artistic black woman and her search for self. Virginia King returns to Akron, her hometown, as an artist-in- the-schools. Her interest in classical cello has become little more than a hobby since the end of her affair with a fellow cellist; her studies of drama and mime led to a dead end because Nixon-era America had no work for a serious black actress; and the experimental puppetry troupe she worked and lived with has gone under. But now, at Washington Elementary School, everything seems at first to go her way: she all but effortlessly captivates the children, as well as a gorgeous man who wears great-smelling cologne and helps heal past disappointment. For drama, there's the...


The Best Love Poems Ever
David Rohlfing (Editor)
0439573904
December 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The beauty. The pain. Being together. Being separated. Love has long been one of the greatest inspirations for poetry. Now read some of the greatest poets of all time as they take on love in all of its forms. Included are poems by: William Shakespeare, Langston Hughes, Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe, William Butler Yeats, Rita Dove, Walt Whitman, Pablo Neruda, Sappho, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti . . . and many more!


Mother Love
Rita Dove
0393038084
May 1995
Hardcover
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On the Bus with Rosa Parks
Rita Dove
039332026X
April 2000
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Review
If you find memoirs more immediate than contemporary poetry, novels more compelling, history more vivid, then you haven't read Rita Dove. A former poet laureate of the United States, Dove is at the height of her powers in On the Bus with Rosa Parks. Her range is extraordinary. The opening "Cameos" sequence reads like a compressed colloquial epic of one hard-up but lively family--Lucille with her "bright and bitter" eyes, her wandering husband, Joe, their bookish son and seven daughters ("their / names fantastic, myriad / as the points of a chandelier"). There are magnificent occasional pieces--"Incarnation in Phoenix" on breastfeeding a newborn ("I'm not ready for this motherhood stuff"); "Against Self-Pity" ("pure misery a luxury /one never learns to enjoy"); "The First Book" ("Dig in: / You'll never reach bottom")....


American Smooth
Rita Dove
0393059871
Sept 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This substantial eighth collection from the former U.S. poet laureate recaps almost all of Dove's various projects and roles. The Ohio-born, Virginia-based poet made her name (and landed a Pulitzer Prize) with the sparsely wrought storytelling verse of Thomas and Beulah (1986). Dove displays her vivid narrative gifts and the formal versatility that enables them in "Not Welcome Here," a sequence about black American soldiers (and soldier-musicians) in the First World War; the sequence may be her strongest work in 10 years. Dove's public presence as laureate and educator—highlighted in On the Bus with Rosa Parks (1999)—informs the very accessible short poems that begin and end the volume, some of them based on dance steps or musical forms ("Fox Trot," "Lullaby," blues); several may be intended for young...


Conversations with Rita Dove
Earl G. Ingersoll (Editor)
1578065496
June 2003
Hardcover
·
 


Grace Notes, Poems
Rita Dove
0393306968
Mar 1991
Paperback
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The Courage to Write: How Writers Transcend Fear
Ralph Keyes
0805074678
October 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Keyes (Nice Guys Finish Seventh) here suggests that writerly anxiety is an inevitable and necessary part of the writing process. Drawing on his own experience and that of others (often from Paris Review or PW interviews), he explores the varieties of anxieties, for example, "page fright"; the pitfalls of putting family and friends into print; and the tension between fear of self-exposure and thirst for attention. In the book's second half, he explores both harnessing and "finessing" fear, arguing that "inner conviction" is more important than technique. He surveys authors' tics and tricks to get started and the question of circulating works-in-progress. Many writing problems "are really courage problems," Keyes concludes, after suggesting that too many good writers give up too soon. While this book lacks the...


Mother Love
Rita Dove
0393314448
May 1996
Paperback
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Poetry: A Pocket Anthology, 4th Edition
R. S. Gwynn
0321244966
November 2004
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Key Benefit: This brief, inexpensive, and portable anthology of poetry features more than 250 poems and presents a diverse body of work ranging from William Shakespeare and John Milton to Rita Dove and Adrienne Rich. Key Topics: Selection of poems along with guidance on how to write about poetry. Index of critical terms included. Market: This interested in a concise introduction to poetry.

From the Back Cover
This brief, affordable poetry collection features over 250 poems, and presents a diverse body of work ranging from William Shakespeare and John Milton to Rita Dove and Adrienne Rich. Wide range of selections (arranged chronologically) from the popular ballads to poets born in the 60's. "Writing About Poetry" section offers readers the most basic tips on organization,...


Thomas and Beulah
Rita Dove
0887480217
July 1987
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The poems in this unusual book tell a story, forming a narrative almost like a realistic novel. Read in sequence as intended, they tell of the lives of a married black couple (not unlike Dove's own grandparents) from the early part of the century until their deaths in the 1960s, a period that spans the great migration of blacks from rural south to urban north. But this is merely the social backdrop to the story of a marriage. Two separate sequences offer two views of the couple's lives: the first, "Mandolin," consists of 23 poems giving Thomas's side, and "Canary in Bloom" gives Beulah's in 21 poems. Together they paint a detailed, poetically dense portrait of two lives in all their frailty, dignity and complexity. The collection was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1987.

...


American Smooth
Rita Dove
0393327442
Feb 2006
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This substantial eighth collection from the former U.S. poet laureate recaps almost all of Dove's various projects and roles. The Ohio-born, Virginia-based poet made her name (and landed a Pulitzer Prize) with the sparsely wrought storytelling verse of Thomas and Beulah (1986). Dove displays her vivid narrative gifts and the formal versatility that enables them in "Not Welcome Here," a sequence about black American soldiers (and soldier-musicians) in the First World War; the sequence may be her strongest work in 10 years. Dove's public presence as laureate and educator—highlighted in On the Bus with Rosa Parks (1999)—informs the very accessible short poems that begin and end the volume, some of them based on dance steps or musical forms ("Fox Trot," "Lullaby," blues); several may be intended for young...


Through the Ivory Gate
Rita Dove
0679742409
Oct 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Kirkus Reviews
A Pulitzer Prize-winning poet (1987) occasionally gives her gift free rein in this somewhat mechanically rendered first novel- -about a young artistic black woman and her search for self. Virginia King returns to Akron, her hometown, as an artist-in- the-schools. Her interest in classical cello has become little more than a hobby since the end of her affair with a fellow cellist; her studies of drama and mime led to a dead end because Nixon-era America had no work for a serious black actress; and the experimental puppetry troupe she worked and lived with has gone under. But now, at Washington Elementary School, everything seems at first to go her way: she all but effortlessly captivates the children, as well as a gorgeous man who wears great-smelling cologne and helps heal past disappointment. For drama, there's the...


The Oxford Anthology of African American Poetry
Arnold Rampersad (Editor)
0195125630
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
If daring and argument forge identity, Stanford professor Rampersad (Life of Langston Hughes) has succeeded in "allowing black poets to create with their own words a portrait of the African-American people." Neither consonant nor cautious, the diversity of the anthology's subject matter is trumped only by its poetic range: Amiri Baraka's and Sonia Sanchez's experimentation vibrate against the classic lyrics of Langston Hughes and Gwendolyn Brooks, mixing visions and trading trials. The anthology, arranged by theme rather than author or time period, simultaneously grounds and sets the reader adrift in a terrain stretching from the American South to Africa, from the contemporary back to slavery. And yet, as Eugene B. Redmond counsels in "Highflown: Love," these poems speak of "A power that cannot be seen / Heard /...


Crossing Color: Transcultural Space and Place in Rita Dove's Poetry, Fiction, and Drama
Therese Steffen
0195134400
July 2001
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Rita Dove (b. 1952) was elected Poet Laureate--the first ever African-American to hold the position--in 1993, in recognition of work that combines racially sensitive observation with searing and immediate personal experience. She is best known for her substantial body of poetry, although she
has also been recognized for her many accomplishments in drama and fiction, written in both German and English. Crossing Color, written by a well-known Americanist in the European community, is the first full-length critical study offering a comprehensive biographic and literary portrait of Rita
Dove and her work.


Selected Poems
Rita Dove
0679750800
Sept 1993
Paperback
·
 
Review
"Remarkable . . . a poet of dramatic force." --The New York Review of Books

"Consistently accomplished . . . Dove's is a brilliant mind that seeks for itself the widest possible play, an ever-expanding range of reference, the most acute distinctions, and the most subtle shadings of meaning. . . . Her is a major career." --Arnold Rampersad, Callaloo

"Dove's poems, rich with elegant phrasing and Southern spice, blast tradition by pulling readers into other lives and then dazzle them with an often startling mastery of language." --Boston Globe

"Rita Dove . . . is a devoted and subtle storyteller [whose] gifts are evoking, and sometimes exalting, the everyday moments we live by but may neglect or forget, the music of her words issuing a message of uncanny...


The Best American Poetry 2000
Rita Dove
0743200330
Sept 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In her introduction to The Best American Poetry 2000, Rita Dove offers the key to honest appreciation: read the work for itself, not for its creator's name and rank on the great chain of poetic being. With luck it will take the top of your head off, though some poems may only elicit a tingle the first time around. Put those away and come back another time, in another mood. "A poem must sing," she writes, "even if the song elicits horror." And the 75 she ultimately chose--by such poetic senior citizens as Lucille Clifton, Thom Gunn, W.S. Merwin, and the as yet unacknowledged--both sing and explode. Her harvest is as varied and abundant as the garden (and gardener!) Stanley Plumley celebrates in "Kunitz Tending Roses": Still, there he is, on any given day,
talking to ramblers, floribundas, Victorian
...


Rita Dove's Cosmopolitanism
Malin Pereira
0252028376
June 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Pulitzer Prize-winner and former poet laureate of the United States Rita Dove has written prolifically since the early 1970s. In this, the first full-length critical study of her entire body of work by an American scholar, Malin Pereira traces the development of Dove's literary voice, looking at the ways she combines racial specificity with the perspective of the unraced universal. Pereira examines Dove's poetry, fiction, drama, and literary criticism closely and chronologically, charting her path through the racially charged culture wars of the 1970s and 1980s. She demonstrates how Dove eventually transcended racial protocols that threaten to define her work and moves into a nomadic poetic articulation of her cosmopolitan identity. As Pereira addresses Rita Dove's cosmopolitanism, she also examines the thematic...

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