Book Finder
    
 
> Literature & Fiction > Authors A-Z > Doyle Roddy
 

Giggler Treatment
Roddy Doyle
0439163005
November 1901
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
What, you might well ask, is the Giggler Treatment? Better yet, what precisely is a Giggler? You won't find out until chapter 6 of Roddy Doyle's The Giggler Treatment, but for those of you who can't wait, here's the answer: Gigglers are "baby-sized and furry. Their fur changes color as they move." Their main occupation in life is to look after children and to punish adults who are mean or unfair to them. And the Treatment? Four words: "Poo on the shoe." The Gigglers have always been there. Since the first dog did its first poo. Since the first caveman grunted at his first cavechild. He stomped out of the cave, straight onto a huge lump of prehistoric poo. In his first children's book, Roddy Doyle, prize-winning author of such adult fare as Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, The Barrytown Trilogy, and A Star Called...


Rover Saves Christmas
Roddy Doyle
0439305330
October 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Although most grownups know Roddy Doyle better from his Barrytown comic novels (including The Commitments), he's thankfully returned for a children's book follow-up to his ridiculously ridiculous The Giggler Treatment. What's the cast of kids from that nimble-witted book leaving on the mantel for Santa? One of their mother's cans of Guinness. Oh, and 27 cheese sandwiches (minus the crusts).

Doyle's decidedly Irish, self-referential silliness gets a workout on Christmas Eve as Robbie and Jimmy Mack find themselves "very bored and very excited" waiting for Christmas Day. They leave a carrot on the mantel, too, for Rudolph, but soon discover that the red-nosed reindeer's on strike. ("Look, man, next year, maybe," Rudolph tells Santa. "It's a mid-life thing. I need a rest.") So it's soon up to Rover, the smartest dog...



Oh, Play That Thing
Roddy Doyle
014303605X
October 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Doyle stumbles somewhat in this sequel to his excellent 1999 bestseller, A Star Called Henry. Beginning with Irish revolutionary Henry Smart's arrival in New York City in 1924, the story follows Henry's subsequent adventures in advertising, bootlegging, pornography, unlicensed dentistry and keeping ahead of the former associates who'd like to see him eat a lead sandwich. After encroaching too much on a mobster's turf—and getting lucky with another powerful fellow's kept lady—Henry hightails it to Chicago, where he becomes the unofficial manager of a young Louis Armstrong. Though serendipitously reunited with his beloved wife and the daughter he's never met while trying to rob her employer's house, Henry soon heads back to New York to help Louis make it big. While just as brash and lively as Doyle's...


Star Called Henry
Roddy Doyle
0143034618
October 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
"Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood." The quote is from Frank McCourt's memoir of growing up impoverished in Limerick, circa World War II. But the sentiment might just as easily have come from the fictional lips of Henry Smart, the hero of Roddy Doyle's remarkable novel of Dublin in the teens, A Star Called Henry. The son of a one-legged hit man, young Henry is the third child born but the first to live through infancy. He is also the second Henry--the first having died, and become a star in the mind of his mother. She held me but she looked up at her twinkling boy. Poor me beside her, pale and red-eyed, held together by rashes and sores. A stomach crying to be filled, bare feet aching like an old, old man's. Me, a shocking substitute for the little Henry who'd been too good for...


The Meanwhile Adventures
Roddy Doyle
0439662109
Oct 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-An award-winning adult author misses the mark with this frenetic children's fantasy. Fired from his job as a biscuit (cookie) taster, Mister Mack decides to become a mad inventor and is mistakenly arrested as a bank robber. Meanwhile, his sons Robbie and Jimmy try to break him out of jail. Meanwhile, their mother is trying to break the women's record for running around the world. Meanwhile, four-year old sister, Kayla, and her friend Victoria set out after Mom, accompanied by canine entrepreneur Rover. The book switches dizzyingly among the four stories, with occasional startling digressions including an army of militant slugs trying to take over the planet. The puckish creatures from Doyle's The Giggler Treatment (Scholastic, 2000) make a return appearance, still pursuing their mission of depositing...


The Woman Who Walked Into Doors
Roddy Doyle
0140255125
December 1996
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Roddy Doyle follows Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, winner of the Booker Prize, and The Commitments with another remarkable book that readers will find funny, sexy, and sad. He takes an unflinching look at the life of Paula Spencer as she struggles to regain her dignity after marriage to an abusive husband and a worsening drinking problem. Capturing both her vulnerability and her strength, Doyle gives Paula a voice that is real and unforgettable. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Doyle's novel about a battered, working-class woman, PW wrote in a starred review, displays "a perception that is rare [and] a compassion that is scorching..- a compassion that is scorching." Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.


Finbar's Hotel
Dermot Bolger
0156006332
Apr 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
It calls itself a novel, but Finbar's Hotel is really more a collection of related short stories by novelists. Irish writer Dermot Bolger came up with the idea to invite six of his literary colleagues to collaborate on a tale about a decrepit Dublin Hotel on the eve of its demolition. In its prime, Finbar's was a glorious place; now, however, it's the haunt of prostitutes and thieves. A new owner plans to pull it down, but before he does, the seven authors (Bolger, Anne Enright, Joseph O'Connor, Roddy Doyle, Jennifer Johnston, Hugo Hamilton, and Colm Tóibín) imagine for it one last night. In "Benny Does Dublin" we meet Ben Winters, a fortysomething husband and father on the lam from his loving family for a single night. "He'd never been in a hotel room before. He wanted to see what staying in one was like. He...


For the Love of Ireland: A Literary Companion for Readers and Travelers
Susan Cahill (Editor)
0345434196
February 2001
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In For the Love of Ireland: A Literary Companion for Readers and Travelers, Susan Cahill (editor of the anthology Desiring Italy) pairs more than 60 writings (by over 40 authors) with geographic, sociological, literary, cultural and practical information. Pieces by Joyce, Roddy Doyle, Yeats, Edna O'Brien, Seamus Heaney and others are followed by Cahill's explications of the works' diverse settings, references, characters and events. Cahill includes travel guide details, such as the current schedule for the ferry that Sean O'Faolain described 50 years ago in An Irish Journey. Driven by literary enthusiasm rather than travel needs, the book suggests jaunts in 16 counties. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
This combination anthology and...


Roddy Doyle
Margaret Reynolds
0099452197
Aug 2004
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 9 Up - This book focuses on the Irish author perhaps best known for his novel The Commitments;its main purpose is to serve as an interactive reading guide. Each chapter highlights one novel, guiding readers with questions about themes, characters, and style. Although scant biographical information is included, the short interview with Doyle sheds much light on his style and themes. This title may be too detailed for average students looking for quick information, but those in AP classes might find it quite useful. - Elizabeth M. Reardon, McCallie School, Chattanooga, TN Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Library Journal
“This title's low list price may appeal to high school students,...


Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha
Roddy Doyle
0140233903
January 1995
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In Roddy Doyle's Booker Prize-winning novel Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, an Irish lad named Paddy rampages through the streets of Barrytown with a pack of like-minded hooligans, playing cowboys and Indians, etching their names in wet concrete, and setting fires. Roddy Doyle has captured the sensations and speech patterns of preadolescents with consummate skill, and managed to do so without resorting to sentimentality. Paddy Clarke and his friends are not bad boys; they're just a little bit restless. They're always taking sides, bullying each other, and secretly wishing they didn't have to. All they want is for something--anything--to happen.

Throughout the novel, Paddy teeters on the nervous verge of adolescence. In one scene, Paddy tries to make his little brother's hot water bottle explode, but gives up after...



The Snapper
Roddy Doyle
0140171673
Aug 1992
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This sketchy novel by Doyle ( The Van forthcoming from Viking; starred PW review, May 25), the second in his trilogy about a working-class Irish family, is almost all dialogue, which would be a clever device if the dialogue were not written in transliterated Irish accent ("yeh" for "you," "Jaysis" for "Jesus"). Fortunately, some endearing characters and a number of hysterically funny lines make this an enjoyable read. The narrative focuses on the Rabbitte family's eldest daughter, who has become pregnant after being raped by a friend's father, although she never recognizes the incident as rape. Sharon is determined to bear the child, referred to in Irish slang as a "snapper," and raise it alone. Although her conversations in pubs with her friends and at home with her family illustrate her position in society and...


The Barrytown Trilogy: The Commitments, the Snapper, the Van
Roddy Doyle
0140252622
August 1995
Paperback
·
 


The Van
Roddy Doyle
0140171916
Aug 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This final novel of Doyle's trilogy about the working-class Rabbitte family of Dublin (following The Commitments and The Snapper ) demonstrates a brash originality and humor that are both uniquely Irish and shrewdly universal. Shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews
A beaten-up van dispensing fish and chips, not some clearing in the deep woods, is the setting for Doyle's warm, humorous, and cleareyed look at male friendship--in this his third book featuring the irrepressible Rabbitte family of Dublin (The Commitments, 1989; The Snapper, see above). When Jimmy Rabbitte, Sr., loses his job, he tries to make the best of it, but what he misses most are his evenings in the local pub with his friends (``it wasn't the...


Brownbread and War
Roddy Doyle
0140231153
Apr 1994
Paperback
·
 


Chisellers
Brendan O'Carroll
0452281229
March 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In his introduction to this second episode in the rollicking trilogy that began with The Mammy (1994), Brendan O'Carroll explains that his greatest surprise and pleasure, in the wake of his newfound literary success, was meeting people who told him it was the first book they had ever read. And it's easy to imagine how new readers would be drawn in by engaging, larger-than-life characters, colorful dialogue, and high-spirited plot. The Chisellers opens in 1970, with the widow Agnes Browne still struggling to raise her brood (the chisellers of the title) alone, although the broad-shouldered Mark is now an apprentice carpenter and Rory, his gay brother, is an apprentice hair stylist. Agnes may be too caught up in her exciting bingo win of 310 pounds to notice that little Dermot is developing a dangerous taste for shoplifting,...


Roddy Doyle: Raining on the Parade
Mary Fitzgerald-Hoyt
1904148255
August 2003
Paperback
·
 

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.