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The Sound and the Fury: A Norton Critical Edition
William Faulkner
0393964817
December 1993
Textbook Paperback
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As I Lay Dying
William Faulkner
067973225X
Jan 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
Faulkner's distinctive narrative structures--the uses of multiple points of view and the inner psychological voices of the characters--in one of its most successful incarnations here in As I Lay Dying. In the story, the members of the Bundren family must take the body of Addie, matriarch of the family, to the town where Addie wanted to be buried. Along the way, we listen to each of the members on the macabre pilgrimage, while Faulkner heaps upon them various flavors of disaster. Contains the famous chapter completing the equation about mothers and fish--you'll see.

Review
"For range of effect, philosophical weight, originality of style, variety of characterization, humor, and tragic intensity, [Faulkner's works] are without equal in our time and...


A Summer of Faulkner
William Faulkner
0307275329
June 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
The 2005 Summer Selection is available in an exclusive three volume boxed edition that includes a special reader’s guide with an introduction by Oprah Winfrey.

Titles include:
As I Lay Dying

This novel is the harrowing account of the Bundren family’s odyssey across the Mississippi countryside to bury Addie, their wife and mother. Told in turns by each of the family members–including Addie herself–the novel ranges in mood from dark comedy to the deepest pathos. Originally published in 1930.

The Sound and the Fury
First published in 1929, Faulkner created his “heart’s darling,” the beautiful and tragic Caddy Compson, whose story Faulkner told through separate monologues by her three brothers–the idiot Benjy, the neurotic suicidal...


Light in August
William Faulkner
0679732268
Jan 1991
Paperback
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Review
“For all his concern with the South, Faulkner was actually seeking out the nature of man. Thus we must turn to him for that continuity of moral purpose which made for the greatness of our classics.” —Ralph Ellison


From the Hardcover edition.

Review
?For all his concern with the South, Faulkner was actually seeking out the nature of man. Thus we must turn to him for that continuity of moral purpose which made for the greatness of our classics.? ?Ralph Ellison


From the Hardcover edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Unvanquished
William Faulkner
0679736522
Oct 1991
Paperback
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Book Description
Set in Mississippi during the Civil War and Reconstruction, THE UNVANQUISHED focuses on the Sartoris family, who, with their code of personal responsibility and courage, stand for the best of the Old South's traditions.

Inside Flap Copy
Set in Mississippi during the Civil War and Reconstruction, THE UNVANQUISHED focuses on the Sartoris family, who, with their code of personal responsibility and courage, stand for the best of the Old South's traditions.


The Sound and the Fury (SparkNotes)
SparkNotes Editors
1586634364
July 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
Get your "A" in gear!

They're today's most popular study guides-with everything you need to succeed in school. Written by Harvard students for students, since its inception SparkNotes™ has developed a loyal community of dedicated users and become a major education brand. Consumer demand has been so strong that the guides have expanded to over 150 titles. SparkNotes'™ motto is Smarter, Better, Faster because:

· They feature the most current ideas and themes, written by experts.
· They're easier to understand, because the same people who use them have also written them.
· The clear writing style and edited content enables students to read through the material quickly, saving valuable time.

And with everything covered--context;...


The Sound and the Fury
William Faulkner
0679732241
Jan 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
The ostensible subject of The Sound and the Fury is the dissolution of the Compsons, one of those august old Mississippi families that fell on hard times and wild eccentricity after the Civil War. But in fact what William Faulkner is really after in his legendary novel is the kaleidoscope of consciousness--the overwrought mind caught in the act of thought. His rich, dark, scandal-ridden story of squandered fortune, incest (in thought if not in deed), madness, congenital brain damage, theft, illegitimacy, and stoic endurance is told in the interior voices of three Compson brothers: first Benjy, the "idiot" man-child who blurs together three decades of inchoate sensations as he stalks the fringes of the family's former pasture; next Quentin, torturing himself brilliantly, obsessively over Caddy's lost virginity and his...


Go Down, Moses
William Faulkner
0679732179
Jan 1991
Paperback
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Book Description
Faulkner examines the changing relationship of black to white and of man to the land, and weaves a complex work that is rich in understanding of the human condition.

Inside Flap Copy
Faulkner examines the changing relationship of black to white and of man to the land, and weaves a complex work that is rich in understanding of the human condition.


Recovering Your Story: Finding Yourself in the Work of Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner and Morrison
Arnold L. Weinstein
140006094X
March 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Weinstein, a professor of comparative literature at Brown, sets out to open up some of the great works of 20th-century fiction to the general reader. His decades in academia show: this is a teacherly account of the authors covered, and although the prose is mostly accessible and shies away from academic jargon, a reader must come to the book with some knowledge of concepts not usually discussed in general conversation: epistemology, jouissance and the Southern Code, to name a few. At first blush, the thesis of the book seems both restricting and reductive: that these novels help us discover "our story, our consciousness of things," as if the only reason to read were a narcissistic project of self-betterment. In fact, though, Weinstein's vision is far more generous. His claim, with other lovers of literature, is...


Intruder in the Dust
William Faulkner
0679736514
Oct 1991
Paperback
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Book Description
A classic Faulkner novel which explores the lives of a family of characters in the South. An aging black who has long refused to adopt the black's traditionally servile attitude is wrongfully accused of murdering a white man.

The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature
Novel by William Faulkner, published in 1948. Set in Faulkner's fictional Yoknapatawpha County, the novel combines the solution of a murder mystery with an exploration of race relations in the South. Charles ("Chick") Mallison, a 16-year-old white boy, feels that he must repay a debt of honor to Lucas Beauchamp, an elderly black man who has helped him but spurns his offers of payment. When Beauchamp is arrested for the murder of a white man, Chick searches for the real killer to save Beauchamp from being...


The Reivers
William Faulkner
0679741925
Sept 1992
Paperback
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From AudioFile
The charm and comedy of this novel, conveyed in Faulkner's complex language, are easily understood through Hill's excellent narration. He does justice to both black and white characters in this story of the joyriding adventures of young Lucius Priest; his cousin, Boon Hogganbeck; and their relation, Ned McCaslin. The novel is hilarious; the narration is excellent. It's unfortunate that the production values are not all they could be. It doesn't ruin one's listening, but it would be much improved if the sound levels didn't vary so much and the tapes were properly cued from side to side. Still, this is a classic item with an excellent reader. E.F. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher
This...


Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston
0060838671
January 2006
Paperback
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Book Review
At the height of the Harlem Renaissance during the 1930s, Zora Neale Hurston was the preeminent black woman writer in the United States. She was a sometime-collaborator with Langston Hughes and a fierce rival of Richard Wright. Her stories appeared in major magazines, she consulted on Hollywood screenplays, and she penned four novels, an autobiography, countless essays, and two books on black mythology. Yet by the late 1950s, Hurston was living in obscurity, working as a maid in a Florida hotel. She died in 1960 in a Welfare home, was buried in an unmarked grave, and quickly faded from literary consciousness until 1975 when Alice Walker almost single-handedly revived interest in her work.

Of Hurston's fiction, Their Eyes Were Watching God is arguably the best-known and perhaps the most controversial. The novel follows...



Collected Stories
William Faulkner
0679764038
Oct 1995
Paperback
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Book Description
This magisterial collection of short works by Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner reminds readers of his ability to compress his epic vision into narratives as hard and wounding as bullets. Among the 42 selections in this book are such classics as "A Bear Hunt, " "A Rose for Emily, " Two Soldiers, " and "The Brooch."

From the Inside Flap
This magisterial collection of short works by Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner reminds readers of his ability to compress his epic vision into narratives as hard and wounding as bullets. Among the 42 selections in this book are such classics as "A Bear Hunt, " "A Rose for Emily, " Two Soldiers, " and "The Brooch."


Selected Short Stories of William Faulkner
William Faulkner
0679424784
May 1993
Hardcover
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From the Back Cover
"Faulkner is the greatest artist the South has produced."

--Ralph Ellison


Includes
Honor
There Was a Queen
Mountain Victory
There Was a Queen
Mountain Victory
Mountain Victory
Beyond
Race at Morning
Beyond
Race at Morning
Barn Burning
Two Soldiers
A Rose for Emily
Dry September
That Evening Sun
Red Leaves
Lo!


Absalom, Absalom!
William Faulkner
0679732187
February 1991
Paperback
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Book Description
The story of Thomas Sutpen, an enigmatic stranger who came to Jefferson in the early 1830s to wrest his mansion out of the muddy bottoms of the north Mississippi wilderness. He was a man, Faulkner said, "who wanted sons and the sons destroyed him."

Inside Flap Copy
The story of Thomas Sutpen, an enigmatic stranger who came to Jefferson in the early 1830s to wrest his mansion out of the muddy bottoms of the north Mississippi wilderness. He was a man, Faulkner said, "who wanted sons and the sons destroyed him."

See all Editorial Reviews

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