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Understood Betsy
Dorothy Canfield Fisher
0805060731
Oct 1999
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Anyone who fondly remembers how the fresh air of the moors puts a blush in the cheeks of sallow young Mary in The Secret Garden will love Dorothy Canfield Fisher's Understood Betsy just as much. First published in 1916, this engaging classic tells the tale of a thin, pale 9-year-old orphan named Elizabeth Ann who is whisked away from her city home and relocated to a Vermont farm where her cousins, the "dreaded Putneys," live. The Putneys are not as bad as her doting, high-strung Aunt Frances warns, however, and Elizabeth, who had been nurtured by her aunt like an overwatered sapling--positively blooms under their breezy, earthy care.

Elizabeth Ann's first victories are small ones--taking the reins from Uncle Harry, doing her own hair, making her own breakfast--but children will revel in the awakening independence and...



Private Solutions for Infrastructure in Honduras
Dorothy Canfield Fisher
0821353667
July 2003
Paperback
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Excerpted from Private Solutions for Infrastructure in Honduras by Dorothy Canfield Fisher. Copyright © 2003. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.
From the Introduction: This book was written in an attempt to promote the development of infrastructure services in Honduras, with the aim of improving the country's competitiveness and contributing to poverty reduction. Its central argument is that Honduras needs a significant increase in private investment in infrastructure services, which should take place in a more competitive environment and be subject to an adequate legal and regulatory framework. The study details the progress to date in Honduran infrastructure sectors, identifying the principal problems that exist and outlining a strategy for their solution. It proposes a general set of principles that should...


A Steady Flameless Light (Stockholm Studies in English Series): The Phenomenology of Realness in Doroth Canfield Fisher's the Brimming Cup, Her Son's Wife and Rough Hewn
Annika Ljung-Baruth
912201960X
December 2002
Paperback
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Bent Twig
Dorothy Canfield
0821411853
May 1997
Paperback
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Book Description
1915. The Bent Twig is the first of Dorothy Canfield's novels to give fictional form to the Montessori method and to reflect in a novel the insights into education and human development that she received in Rome while visiting Maria Montessori. The home in which the twig of this novel, Sylvia Marshall, grew up is a Montessori home, where everyone takes part in home tasks, and the children learn by being included in adult activities. How very new these ideas were in middle America is shown by the contrast between the Marshall home and the rest of the community. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Download Description
Her life was, however, brimming with active interests which occupied her,...


Keeping Fires Night and Day
Dorothy Canfield Fisher
0826208843
Apr 1993
Hardcover
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The Bedquilt and Other Stories
Dorothy Canfield Fisher
0826211402
June 1997
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
War, greed, love, women's rights, marital discord and race relations are prominent themes in the unaffectedly realist stories of Fisher (1879-1958), once a bestselling novelist (The Brimming Cup, etc.). The 11 stories and two essays reprinted here (all but one from a long out-of-print 1956 anthology) resonate with contemporary relevance. In the title story, an elderly New England spinster, invisible in her brother's home, finally receives recognition for her housework by exhibiting at a county fair the magnificent quilt she spent five years making. In "Through Pity and Terror...," Fisher, who founded a hospital for refugee children in France during WWI, draws on firsthand experience to describe a young mother's struggle to survive as German soldiers ransack her home and her husband's pharmacy. Abhorrence of war...


Writers of Conviction
Julia C. Ehrhardt
0826215068
Feb 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
In Writers of Conviction, Julia C. Ehrhardt examines the literary careers of four American writers who have not received the critical attention they deserve: Zona Gale, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Rose Wilder Lane, and Josephine Herbst. By reintroducing these authors, Ehrhardt reveals a fascinating and unexplored aspect of white, middle-class, and female authorship: the provocative links between each writer's personal politics and her literary aspirations. She uses this innovative critical perspective to show that each woman became a writer in order to express her political beliefs to the largest possible audience. Combining feminist literary theory, women's history, and biographical criticism, this work presents a compelling study of a woman's individual journey to political consciousness and the writings that resulted...


Seasoned Timber
Dorothy Canfield Fisher
0874517532
Jan 1996
Paperback
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From Library Journal
In addition to being a respected author, Fisher was also an educational reformer, a social activist, and for 25 years a member of the Book-of-the-Month Club selection committee. First published in 1939, this was the last novel Fisher wrote about her native Vermont. It follows the difficulties faced by Clifford Academy headmaster T.C. Hulme after the academy is willed $1 million with the stipulation that Jews, girls, and locals must be squeezed out.Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
A small Vermont town faces a referendum on the place of human decency in a changing, troubled world.

See all Editorial Reviews


Understood Betsy
Dorothy Canfield Fisher
0874519209
Jan 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Anyone who fondly remembers how the fresh air of the moors puts a blush in the cheeks of sallow young Mary in The Secret Garden will love Dorothy Canfield Fisher's Understood Betsy just as much. First published in 1916, this engaging classic tells the tale of a thin, pale 9-year-old orphan named Elizabeth Ann who is whisked away from her city home and relocated to a Vermont farm where her cousins, the "dreaded Putneys," live. The Putneys are not as bad as her doting, high-strung Aunt Frances warns, however, and Elizabeth, who had been nurtured by her aunt like an overwatered sapling--positively blooms under their breezy, earthy care.

Elizabeth Ann's first victories are small ones--taking the reins from Uncle Harry, doing her own hair, making her own breakfast--but children will revel in the awakening independence and...



The Home-Maker
Dorothy Canfield
0897330692
Feb 1983
Paperback
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Midwest Book Review
Although this novel first appeared in 1924, it deals in an amazingly contemporary manner with the problems of a family in which both husband and wife are oppressed and frustrated by the roles that they are expected to play. Evangeline Knapp is the perfect, compulsive housekeeper, while her husband, Lester, is a poet and a dreamer. Suddenly, through a nearly fatal accident, their roles re reversed: Lester is confined to home in a wheelchair and his wife must work to support the family. The changes that take place between husband and wife, parents and children, are both fascinating and poignant. The characters are brought to life in a vivid, compelling way in a powerful novel more relevant now than when it was first published. The Home-Maker is one of those "time lost" novels whose recovery will entertain...


Understood Betsy
Dorothy Canfield
1417909552
Apr 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Anyone who fondly remembers how the fresh air of the moors puts a blush in the cheeks of sallow young Mary in The Secret Garden will love Dorothy Canfield Fisher's Understood Betsy just as much. First published in 1916, this engaging classic tells the tale of a thin, pale 9-year-old orphan named Elizabeth Ann who is whisked away from her city home and relocated to a Vermont farm where her cousins, the "dreaded Putneys," live. The Putneys are not as bad as her doting, high-strung Aunt Frances warns, however, and Elizabeth, who had been nurtured by her aunt like an overwatered sapling--positively blooms under their breezy, earthy care.

Elizabeth Ann's first victories are small ones--taking the reins from Uncle Harry, doing her own hair, making her own breakfast--but children will revel in the awakening independence and...



The Home Maker
Dorothy Canfield
1417917067
May 2004
Paperback
·
 
Midwest Book Review
Although this novel first appeared in 1924, it deals in an amazingly contemporary manner with the problems of a family in which both husband and wife are oppressed and frustrated by the roles that they are expected to play. Evangeline Knapp is the perfect, compulsive housekeeper, while her husband, Lester, is a poet and a dreamer. Suddenly, through a nearly fatal accident, their roles re reversed: Lester is confined to home in a wheelchair and his wife must work to support the family. The changes that take place between husband and wife, parents and children, are both fascinating and poignant. The characters are brought to life in a vivid, compelling way in a powerful novel more relevant now than when it was first published. The Home-Maker is one of those "time lost" novels whose recovery will entertain...

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