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The Poem That Changed America: "Howl" Fifty Years Later
Jason Shinder (Editor)
0374173435
March 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
If the opening lines of Allen Ginsberg's "Howl" aren't seared into your brain, they will be by the end of this collection of 26 essays compiled by Shinder, a poet (Among Women) who learned much of his craft as Ginsberg's pupil. It's a shame the poem isn't included, though it feels as if it's quoted in its entirety at various points (the hardcover edition does come with a Ginsberg reading on CD). This collection juxtaposes reflections by writers such as Rick Moody and Andrei Codrescu about the impact of "Howl' on their lives; Billy Collins writes, "...it wasn't a waste of time for a Catholic high school boy from the suburbs to try to sound in his poems like a downtown homosexual Jewish beatnik." Robert Pinsky writes that he was initially elated by the poem's linguistic freedom even more than by its raw emotion....


American Scream
Jonah Raskin
0520240154
Apr 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
When shy, soft-spoken 29-year-old Allen Ginsberg appeared before an audience at San Francisco’s Six Gallery on the evening of October 7, 1955, he was virtually unknown, but the unpublished poem he (with mounting fervor) read would propel him to fame with the suddenness and inevitability of Byron. By the time of Ginsberg’s death in 1997, "Howl" had sold 800,00 copies, and the incendiary, visionary poem is now the subject of Sonoma State professor Raskin’s thorough, accessible history. The strength of Raskin’s book is the balance it strikes between the personal drama of the poem’s composition and reception and the unfolding background of its historical circumstance. For instance, Raskin sketches the larger generational tensions "Howl" records against the young Ginsberg’s personal...


Howl and Other Poems
Allen Ginsberg
0872860175
July 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
The epigraph for Howl is from Walt Whitman: "Unscrew the locks from the doors!/Unscrew the doors themselves from their jambs!" Announcing his intentions with this ringing motto, Allen Ginsberg published a volume of poetry which broke so many social taboos that copies were impounded as obscene, and the publisher, poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, was arrested. The court case that followed found for Ginsberg and his publisher, and the publicity made both the poet and the book famous. Ginsberg went on from this beginning to become a cultural icon of sixties radicalism. This works seminal place in the culture is indicated in Czeslaw Milosz's poetic tribute to Ginsberg: "Your blasphemous howl still resounds in a neon desert where the human tribe wanders, sentenced to unreality". --This text refers to the...


Allen Ginsberg CD Poetry Collection
Allen Ginsberg
0060734159
Dec 2004
Audio Compact Disc - Unabridged
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From AudioFile
It's important to have a record of an author reading his own work, such as this 1995 performance of Ginsberg's selected works. The material is personal, political, hortatory, sexual, satirical, and for the most part, thoughtful, funny, or touching. But this performance is primarily for students or devotees of Ginsberg, who was not a great reader. His voice is more nasal than sonorous. At times, he declaims the poetry like a prophet, but at others he tends toward an amateurish-sounding singsong delivery. His singing is painful, even with musical and vocal backup. The program includes a badly proofread booklet of reprinted poems, songs, and "random thoughts." W.M. © AudioFile 2005, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine

Book Description

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The Poem That Changed America: "Howl" Fifty Years Later
Jason Shinder (Editor)
0374173443
March 2006
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
If the opening lines of Allen Ginsberg's "Howl" aren't seared into your brain, they will be by the end of this collection of 26 essays compiled by Shinder, a poet (Among Women) who learned much of his craft as Ginsberg's pupil. It's a shame the poem isn't included, though it feels as if it's quoted in its entirety at various points (the hardcover edition does come with a Ginsberg reading on CD). This collection juxtaposes reflections by writers such as Rick Moody and Andrei Codrescu about the impact of "Howl' on their lives; Billy Collins writes, "...it wasn't a waste of time for a Catholic high school boy from the suburbs to try to sound in his poems like a downtown homosexual Jewish beatnik." Robert Pinsky writes that he was initially elated by the poem's linguistic freedom even more than by its raw emotion....


White Shroud
Allen Ginsberg
0060914297
Nov 1987
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Lately, Ginsberg hasn't always been in top form, but "Howl" remains a masterpiece. White Shroud is the best of his later works.Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
Poems by a modern master. "[Ginsberg's] powerful mixture of Blake, Whitman, Pound, and Williams, to which he added his own volatile, grotesque, and tender humor, has assured him a memorable place in modern poetry."-- Helen Vendler

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Junky
William S. Burroughs
0142003166
April 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
Before his 1959 breakthrough, Naked Lunch, an unknown William S. Burroughs wrote Junk, his first book, a candid, eyewitness account of times and places that are now long gone. This book brings them vividly to life again; it is an unvarnished field report from the American postwar underground. For this definitive 50th-anniversary edition, eminent Burroughs scholar Oliver Harris has painstakingly re-created the author's original text, word by word, from archival typescripts. Here for the first time are Burroughs's own unpublished Introduction and an entire omitted chapter, along with many "lost" passages and auxiliary texts by Allen Ginsberg and others. Harris's comprehensive Introduction reveals the composition history of Junk's text and places its contents against a lively historical background. ...


Collected Poems 1947-1980
Allen Ginsberg
0060914947
May 1988
Paperback
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Book Review
Tortured by the paranoia and mental illness of his immigrant mother, and by his own homosexuality in a society that was homophobic, Allen Ginsberg's early work was as much a measure of his self-loathing as his detestation of social hypocrisy and injustice. His poems reached depths of humiliation and shame that presaged a mental breakdown, followed by recovery with the help of Buddhist philosophy. Ginsberg's political commitment was fired by his involvement with Jack Kerouac, Gary Snyder and others in the Beat movement, a poetry of social protest that refused perceived elitist boundaries. Despite a tendency toward propaganda, Ginsberg's best poetry is infused with satiric comedy and cheerful self-parody, and is most readily appreciated when read aloud.

The New Yorker, Helen Vendler
...


Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems
Edgar Allan Poe
0785814531
April 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
This collection of 73 short stories and 48 poems includes such masterpieces as The Fall of the House of Usher, The Purloined Letter, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Raven, and Murders in the Rue Morgue. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Howl
Allen Ginsberg
0060926112
April 1995
Paperback
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-- Helen Vendler
"[His] powerful mixture of Blake, Whitman, Pound, and Williams, to which he added his own volatile, grotesque, and tender humor, has assured him a memorable place in modern poetry."

Bob Dylan
"Ginsberg is both tragic and dynamic, a lyrical genius...probably the single greatest influence on American poetical voice since Whitman."

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Cosmopolitan Greetin
Allen Ginsberg
0060926236
Apr 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Reading a new collection of poems by Ginsberg ( White Shroud ) is rather like receiving a letter from a beloved and somewhat eccentric friend--you either luxuriate in the details of his latest global adventures and musings, or just feel amazed that he's kept up the frenetic, peripatetic pace for so long. Regardless, Greetings is suffused with a range of emotional colors that gives Ginsberg's work an added depth, a restless energy and ultimately an elegiac tone. Writing from China, Warsaw, Nicaragua and New York City, the poet makes strong statements on two of his favorite subjects, politics ("CIA Dope Calypso" offers a three-part historical analysis that you can dance to) and sexuality ("To Jacob Rabinowitz" remembers a lover who "hardly out of puberty gave me / your ass bright eyes and virgin body a whole...


Forever Young: Photographs of Bob Dylan
Douglas R. Gilbert
0306814811
October 2005
Hardcover
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The Boston Globe 10/6/2005
"Gilbert captures Dylan at a pivotal point in his career."

Relix 11/2005
"The photographs of Douglas Gilbert show a Dylan that no other pictures from the period capture."

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Journals Mid-Fifties
Allen Ginsberg
0060926813
Apr 1996
Paperback
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Washington Post Book World
"An engaging read full of atmospheric ramblings, gossip, serious talk about literature and some energetic poems."

Book Description
These revealing, personal journals of America's most influential living poet are "the essential record of the questing, wild-eyed, lustful young poet's sexual, spiritual, and literary odyssey"--Kirkus Reviews (starred)

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Deliberate Prose
Allen Ginsberg
0060930810
Apr 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
"I got so mad I cut my beard and mailed it in an envelope to the district attorney." Sometimes lovely, sometimes slapdash, and sure to appeal to his broad contingent of fans, this sprawling compilation of 154 "essays" (many run only a page or so) memorializes Ginsberg's stances, opinions, reactions, experiences and proclamations. Gathering reams of fugitive prose from magazines and anthologies, and excluding prose found in Ginsberg's books of poems, this is more an omnium-gatherum than a best-of, inviting readers to sort through and make their own lists. Ginsberg (1926-1997) had begun to organize what would become this book when he died; editor Morgan, who took over the process, divides the work by theme into eight sections. "Politics and Prophecies" fittingly opens the collection, giving full vent to Ginsberg's...


Visions of Cody
Jack Kerouac
0140179070
August 1993
Paperback
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Big Sur
Jack Kerouac
0140168125
April 1992
Paperback
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From AudioFile
This autobiographical novel continues the adventures of the (older but certainly not mellower) wandering beatnik from ON THE ROAD. For a narrator it contains extraordinary difficulties, for the writing flies off into inebriated, overly long sentences that reflect, describe or just babble forward in a kind of free association. To keep such passages flowing while making sense out of them is no mean feat. Tom Parker pulls it off, erring only infrequently in his interpretation. He even manages to sound as if he were enjoying himself. The production is clean but tinny, possibly dampening the pleasure of home listeners, but hardly bothering drivers listening over traffic noise. Y.R. (c) AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.


Spontaneous Mind
Allen Ginsberg
0060930829
Apr 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Ginsberg apparently approached each interviewer "as a future Buddha"; open to any opportunity for conversation, he answered every question, no matter how rude or peculiar. An unpublished 1983 interview here with Steve Foehr consists of one query about the relationship between art and commerce and Ginsberg's seven-page answer ("I simply hung on and tried to get it all written down," says Foehr); others fill only half of a page. The Beat master reiterates that all of his thoughts and expressions emerge from his 1948 auditory hallucination of the voice of William Blake, whose poetic rhythms, childlike innocence, social vision and volatile emotionalism infused Ginsberg's every utterance thereafter. Taken together, these interviews read like an immense jazz oratorio, with rising and falling riffs on prosody, politics,...


Death & Fame
Allen Ginsberg
0060930837
Mar 2000
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
There has never been an American poet as public as Ginsberg. He bared?and dared?all: as Beat, as bohemian, as gay man, as Buddhist, left-winger, East Village stroller?greeting all with messages of peace, dissent and sex. Despite his unorthodoxies, he belonged very much to a culture he helped build. Above all he was a survivor (unlike many of his compatriots), a seemingly eternal and yet contemporary voice always fresh with headlines. This volume, to be published on the second anniversary of his death, is no throwaway compendium of scattered verses. Rather, it is a perfect capstone to a noble life; the authentic, unmistakably Ginsbergian nature of its themes ("God"; "Excrement"; "Butterfly Mind") mixes effortlessly with remarkably intimate renderings of his approaching death. Though diabetes and heart problems...


Poetry Speaks: Hear Great Poets Read Their Work from Tennyson to Plath
Elise Paschen (Editor)
1570717206
October 2001
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This is the definitive anthology to date of canonical poets reading short selections of their own work. Though some of the audio here has been widely available for decades, it is certainly exciting to hear Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Eliot and Co. reading their work and to read easily along in the provided text indeed, a huge first printing of 100,000 is riding on that excitement. Former Poetry Society of America executive director Paschen and National Public Radio reporter Mosby have assembled a very high-wattage team of living poets to write short essays on the historic ones whose voices we hear. The real standouts are about the less familiar of the latter: Rita Dove on the superb modernist Melvin B. Tolson; Forrest Gander on the magisterial Laura (Riding) Jackson; Michael Palmer on San Francisco Renaissance man...

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