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Rose That Grew from Concrete
Tupac Shakur
0671028448
November 1999
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
YA-A collection of poetry written by the rapper between 1989 and 1991, before he became famous. The poems are passionate, sometimes angry, and often compelling. Selections are reproduced from the originals in Shakur's handwriting, personalized by distinctive spelling and the use of ideographs (a drawing of an eye for I, etc.), and complete with scratch outs and corrections. With the exception of "In the Event of My Demise," all of the pieces are accompanied by typed text, which leaves his spelling intact. Some poems are also accompanied by his drawings. A few black-and-white photographs appear throughout. A preface by Shakur's mother, a foreword by Nikki Giovanni, and an introduction by his manager, Leila Steinburg, in whose writing group the poems were written, complete this unique volume.Susan Salpini,...


Rosa
Nikki Giovanni
0805071067
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review

Book Review's Significant Seven
Nikki Giovanni graciously agreed to answer the questions we like to ask every author: the Book Review Significant Seven.
Q: What book has had the most significant impact on your life?
A: No single book. The poetry of Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, and Gwendolyn Brooks was an impact, however.

Q: You are stranded on a desert island with only one book, one CD, and one DVD--what are they?
A: Sula by Toni Morrison, Great American Spirituals, and The Godfather.

Q: What is the worst lie you've ever told?
A: "You're the best."

Q: Describe the perfect writing environment.
A: A cup of coffee, my rocking chair, the sun just rising through my left window....


Poetry Speaks to Children
Elise Paschen
1402203292
September 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 3-8–A fine, basic collection. Approximately half of the 97 selections are read or performed on the accompanying CD. The book provides a mix of adult writers (Rita Dove, Seamus Heaney, and Billy Collins, among others) and those whose work is specifically for children, such as X. J. Kennedy and Mary Ann Hoberman. Topics include childhood, animals, nonsense poems, and humor (including C. K. Williams's Gas, which dwells on the fact that FARTING IS FORBIDDEN!). The three illustrators have captured the different tones of the selections, from a comic portrait of the Jabberwock slayer wearing a colander and wielding a plunger and the wailing children in William Stafford's First Grade, to the moving paintings of a girl with flowers echoing the natural images of James Berry's Okay, Brown Girl, Okay. The CD...


The Collected Poetry of Nikki Giovanni: 1968-1998
Nikki Giovanni
0060541334
November 2003
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
With the initially self-published Black Feeling Black Talk (1968) and the same year's Black Judgment, the then 25-year-old Giovanni helped take the Black Arts Movement to national prominence, including TV appearances, a top-selling spoken-word LP, and nine books (counting interviews and anthologies) in the next six years. Giovanni's fiery yet personal early voice struck many listeners as the authentic sound of black militancy: "This is a crazy country," one poem explained, "But we can't be Black/ And not be crazy"; "White degrees do not qualify negroes to run/ The Black Revolution." The '70s saw Giovanni move toward more personal or private concerns: "touching was and still is and will always be the true/ revolution," she concluded in 1972, suggesting a few years later "We gulp when we realize/ There are few...


Paint Me Like I Am: Teen Poems from WritersCorps
WritersCorps
0064472647
March 2003
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 7 Up-WritersCorps works with disadvantaged youth, encouraging teens to express themselves through writing and recording voices that might otherwise not be heard. The young people have a lot to say about race, drugs, abuse, and self-image, as seen in these honest and sometimes raw poems. There are some good metaphors here ("Bodies sprawled along the shelter's floor-,/like sloppy cursive writing-" "I'm a sleepy flower,/and the ground waves at me"). "Alone in a darkness that laughs in your face," one poem notes. All the contributors are intensely aware of "self." One girl writes, "When I feel like I'm going to fall apart,/I hold my ribs, all the way around-/I hold brightness and shadows in/the hollow where my ribs meet-/I hold my ribs, until I feel solid." As in any anthology, there are some literary...


Love Poems
Nikki Giovanni
0688149898
February 1997
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
The bold, romantic, and sometimes erotic poems found here include "Seduction," "I Wrote a Good Omelet," and "My House."Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist
In one way or another, love shapes most of Giovanni's smart, to-the-point, and emotionally candid poems, but it's wonderful to have a volume devoted strictly to her love poems, especially since it contains 20 new compositions. Giovanni is one of America's most popular poets, because she speaks her mind clearly and has such a good time doing it. As she writes in "A Poem: For Langston Hughes": "wool is sheared . . . silk is spun / weaving is hard . . . but words are fun," a sentiment she brings to rich fruition in her more playful poems, rhyming wonders reminiscent of old blues lyrics where every...


Honey, Hush!: An Anthology of African American Women's Humor
Daryl Cumber Cumber Dance (Editor)
0393318184
December 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
This massive (nearly 700 pages) anthology offers a fascinating survey of black women's humor, compiled from folk sources, the blues, and poetry, fiction, anecdotal recollections, and routines by such comedians as the late Jackie "Moms" Mabley. The title, editor Daryl Cumber Dance informs, is a "playful entreaty" that black women use to encourage each other or to express disbelief in private conversations when swapping jokes and tall tales. Some of the material in Honey, Hush is a bit bawdy and off-color, and Dance, a professor of English at the University of Richmond in Virginia, warns that "humor is often unkind, unfair, and unjust." Enter with an open mind and a willingness to laugh, however, and you'll be sure to have fun. --This text refers to the Hardcover ...


Blues
Nikki Giovanni
0688156983
May 1999
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
Social and/or political poetry often fails because it loses touch with humanity; it gets distracted by issues and forgets about the impact of things on people. Giovanni never loses sight of the people in her work. In poems built with broken lines and paragraphs of prose, she spars with the ills that confront us, but every struggle has a human face. Ask Roger Woody, of the Woody Pipe and Excavating Company, who is destroying the wonderful woodland adjacent to Giovanni's home and readying it for a new housing development. When a young basketball star is harassed for his youth and style ("Iverson"), she assumes the role of compassionate but stern sister. She is no less forthcoming with her opinions of the President and his woes. At times you wonder what makes these soapbox oratories poems. You will not find many...


Paint Me Like I Am
WritersCorps
0060292881
Mar 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 7 Up-WritersCorps works with disadvantaged youth, encouraging teens to express themselves through writing and recording voices that might otherwise not be heard. The young people have a lot to say about race, drugs, abuse, and self-image, as seen in these honest and sometimes raw poems. There are some good metaphors here ("Bodies sprawled along the shelter's floor-,/like sloppy cursive writing-" "I'm a sleepy flower,/and the ground waves at me"). "Alone in a darkness that laughs in your face," one poem notes. All the contributors are intensely aware of "self." One girl writes, "When I feel like I'm going to fall apart,/I hold my ribs, all the way around-/I hold brightness and shadows in/the hollow where my ribs meet-/I hold my ribs, until I feel solid." As in any anthology, there are some literary...


Ego-Tripping and Other Poems for Young People
Nikki Giovanni
1556521898
November 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Booklist
Gr. 5 and up, younger for reading aloud. Giovanni has added 10 new poems to her acclaimed 1973 collection of 23 poems for young people. Ford's illustrations in sepia shades are bold and full of character and dreaming. As Virginia Hamilton says in her foreword, Giovanni's voice is personal and warm, she "celebrates ordinary folks" and writes of struggle and liberation. She's upbeat and celebratory without minimizing hard times. The publisher doesn't indicate which are the new poems, but, certainly, any library that doesn't have the original title will want to buy this one. These are poems that sing. Giovanni says, "if i were a poet / i'd kidnap you," and that's what she does. Hazel Rochman

Card catalog description
Thirty-two poems that reflect aspects of the African...


The Nikki Giovanni Poetry Collection
Nikki Giovanni
0060514280
Dec 2002
Audio Cassette - Abridged
·
 
From AudioFile
Nikki Giovanni blends the personal with the political in this engaging collection of poems written over 40 years, from the 1960s through 2002. They are poems that make one laugh and make one think. "Train Rides" celebrates the care received as a child from Pullman porters when she rode the train alone and sorrows over the generation of proud black men now in jail instead of on the job. "Hands: For Mother's Day" applauds the comfort and care offered by women's hands while prodding conventional wisdom --man didn't learn to walk upright to chase prey; woman learned to walk upright to carry the baby and the toddler and all the other provisions. Of course! Throughout, Giovanni shares thought-provoking stories about what led to the poems. She talks and reads fast, at first, almost too fast. Halfway through the first cassette,...


The Prosaic Soul of Nikki Giovanni (Perennial Classics)
Nikki Giovanni
0060541342
December 2003
Paperback
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Book Description

For the first time, the collected prose of national treasure Nikki Giovanni

Gemini: An Extended Autobiographical Statement on My First Twenty-Five Years of Being a Black Poet
Nominated for the National Book Award, this is a journey -- both private and public -- through the trials and triumphs of 1960s America.

Sacred Cows ... And Other Edibles
Winner of the Ohioana Library Award, these fresh and wryly humorous essays explore some of America's lofty institutions and the poet's pivotal life experiences.

Racism 101
This collection of essays contributes a vital and critical chapter to the debate on American national values.

About the Author
When Nikki Giovanni's poems first emerged during the Civil Rights, Black Power and Black Arts...



Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea: Poems and Not Quite Poems
Nikki Giovanni
0060099526
October 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
Particularly in light of the recent deaths of June Jordan and Gwendolyn Brooks, readers might well look to Giovanni as spokeswoman for the black experience. And, at times, she captures it, effectively representing "all the women who said Baby, Baby, Baby I know you didn't mean to lose your job...I know you didn't mean to gamble the rentmoney I know you didn't mean to hit me." A recent poem, "Have Dinner with Me," written after the World Trade Center collapsed, is a modern masterpiece. Unfortunately, too many of these poems, though themselves strong, seem intent on rehashing the 1950s political climate. And the "Not Quite Poems" predominate. These proselike pieces include childhood memoirs that draw the reader clearly into her experiences, and there is a delightful spoof on what the movie of Harry...


The Nikki Giovanni Poetry Collection CD
Nikki Giovanni
0060514299
Dec 2002
Audio Compact Disc - Abridged
·
 
From AudioFile
Nikki Giovanni blends the personal with the political in this engaging collection of poems written over 40 years, from the 1960s through 2002. They are poems that make one laugh and make one think. "Train Rides" celebrates the care received as a child from Pullman porters when she rode the train alone and sorrows over the generation of proud black men now in jail instead of on the job. "Hands: For Mother's Day" applauds the comfort and care offered by women's hands while prodding conventional wisdom --man didn't learn to walk upright to chase prey; woman learned to walk upright to carry the baby and the toddler and all the other provisions. Of course! Throughout, Giovanni shares thought-provoking stories about what led to the poems. She talks and reads fast, at first, almost too fast. Halfway through the first cassette,...

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