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Namesake
Jhumpa Lahiri
0618485228
September 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Jhumpa Lahiri's debut story collection, Interpreter of Maladies, took the literary world by storm when it won the Pulitzer Prize in 2000. Fans who flocked to her stories will be captivated by her best-selling first novel, now in paperback for the first time. The Namesake is a finely wrought, deeply moving family drama that illuminates this acclaimed author's signature themes: the immigrant experience, the clash of cultures, the tangled ties between generations. The Namesake takes the Ganguli family from their tradition-bound life in Calcutta through their fraught transformation into Americans. On the heels of an arranged wedding, Ashoke and Ashima Ganguli settle in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where Ashoke does his best to adapt while his wife pines for home. When their son, Gogol, is born, the task of naming him...


The Collected Tales of Nikolai Gogol
Nikolai Gogol
0375706151
July 1999
Paperback
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The New Yorker, James Wood
...a superb ... translation... --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

The Los Angeles Times Sunday Book Review, Leonard Michaels
This is the Gogolian surreal. Unlike most of what we call surrealism, it doesn't feel gratuitous, meretricious or trivial. It has the mysterious cogency of a dream, and the quality of realness that we hesitate to say is merely a dream. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Editorial Reviews


Diary of a Madman and Other Stories
Nikolai Vasil'evich Gogol
0140442731
Feb 1973
Paperback
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From AudioFile
The title loony, an obsessive petty bureaucrat, first saw the literary light of day in 1835, when his creator, Russia's first great fiction writer, was gaining his initial renown. Backed up by percussion instruments, Stephen Ouimette impersonates him here in a Stratford Festival staged reading, which was recorded by the CBC in Toronto. By and large, the story satirizes the officialdom of the time and place, but Ouimette, while doing his best with humor that has gotten a bit stale, chillingly plays his character's descent into madness. A fine performance. Y.R. © AudioFile 2002, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Book Description
Gogol's characters are common people and his...


Dead Souls (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Nikolai Gogol
1593080921
June 2005
Paperback
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Dead Souls
Nikolai Vasil'evich Gogol
0140448071
Jan 2005
Paperback
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Vladimir Nabokov
Gogol was a strange creature, but then genius is always strange.

Book Description
Dead Souls is one of the most unusual works of nineteenth-century fiction and a devastating satire on social hypocrisy. Chichikov, a mysterious stranger, arrives in a provincial town and visits a succession of landowners to make each a strange offer. He proposes to buy the names of dead serfs still registered on the census, saving their owners from paying tax on them, and to use these "souls" as collateral to reinvent himself as a gentleman. In this ebullient masterpiece, Gogol created a grotesque gallery of human types, from the bear-like Sobakevich to the insubstantial fool Manilov, and, above all, the devilish con man Chichikov.

See all Editorial...


The Namesake
Jhumpa Lahiri
0395927218
September 2003
Hardcover
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Book Review
Any talk of The Namesake--Jhumpa Lahiri's follow-up to her Pulitzer Prize-winning debut, Interpreter of Maladies--must begin with a name: Gogol Ganguli. Born to an Indian academic and his wife, Gogol is afflicted from birth with a name that is neither Indian nor American nor even really a first name at all. He is given the name by his father who, before he came to America to study at MIT, was almost killed in a train wreck in India. Rescuers caught sight of the volume of Nikolai Gogol's short stories that he held, and hauled him from the train. Ashoke gives his American-born son the name as a kind of placeholder, and the awkward thing sticks.

Awkwardness is Gogol's birthright. He grows up a bright American boy, goes to Yale, has pretty girlfriends, becomes a successful architect, but like many second-generation...



Dead Souls
Nikolai Vasil'evich Gogol
0192818376
Nov 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
A socially adept newcomer fluidly inserts himself into an unnamed Russian town, conquering first the drinkers, then the dignitaries. All find him amiable, estimable, agreeable. But what exactly is Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov up to?--something that will soon throw the town "into utter perplexity."

After more than a week of entertainment and "passing the time, as they say, very pleasantly," he gets down to business--heading off to call on some landowners. More pleasantries ensue before Chichikov reveals his bizarre plan. He'd like to buy the souls of peasants who have died since the last census. The first landowner looks carefully to see if he's mad, but spots no outward signs. In fact, the scheme is innovative but by no means bonkers. Even though Chichikov will be taxed on the supposed serfs, he will be...



Plays and Petersburg Tales
Nikolai Vasil'evich Gogol
0192835521
June 1999
Paperback
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Book Description
This volume brings together Gogol's Petersburg Tales with his two most famous plays, all of which guide us through the streets of St. Petersburg, the city erected by force and ingenuity on the marshes of the Neva estuary. Something of the deception and violence of the city's creation seems to
lurk beneath its harmonious facade, however, and it confounds its inhabitants with false dreams and absurd visions. This new translation by Christopher English brings out the unique vitality and humor of Russia's finest comic writer.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Russian --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Dead Souls
Nikolai Gogol
0486426823
July 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
A stranger arrives in a Russian backwater community with a bizarre proposition for the local landowners: cash for their "dead souls," the serfs who have died in their service and for whom they must continue to pay taxes until the next census. The landowner receives a payment and a relief of his tax burden, and the stranger receives--what? Gogol's comic masterpiece offers a vast and satirical painting of the Russian panorama as it traces the path and encounters of its mysterious protagonist in pursuit of his dubious scheme. Dead Souls, regarded as both a realistic portrait of nineteenth-century Russia and a work of great symbolism, continues to inspire twenty-first century authors and readers.


The Complete Tales of Nikolai Gogol, Volume 1
Nikolai Vasil'evich Gogol
0226300684
Apr 1985
Paperback
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Book Description
"This new two-volume edition should do something for increasing Gogol's fame as the most original, imaginative, and exuberant of all Russian writers, as the greatest comedian and humorist among a rather solemn lot."--Rene Wellek, Yale University




Absurdistan
Gary Shteyngart
1400061962
May 2, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Misha Vainberg, the rich, arrogant and very funny hero of Shteyngart's follow-up to The Russian Debutante's Handbook, compares himself early on to Prince Myshkin from Dostoyevski's The Idiot: "Like the prince, I am something of a holy fool... an innocent surrounded by schemers." Readers will more likely note his striking resemblance to John Kennedy Toole's Ignatius Reilly. A "sophisticate and a melancholic," Misha is an obese 30-year-old Russian heir to a post-Soviet fortune. After living in the Midwest and New York City for 12 years, he considers himself "an American impounded in a Russian body." But his father in St. Petersburg has killed an Oklahoma businessman and then turned up dead himself, and Misha, trying to leave Petersburg after the funeral, is denied a visa to the United States....


The Overcoat and Other Short Stories
Nikolai Gogol
0486270572
February 1992
Paperback
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Book Description
Four works by great 19th-century Russian author: "The Nose," a savage satire of Russia’s incompetent bureaucrats and its snobbish and complacent upper classes; "Old-Fashioned Farmers," a pleasant depiction of an elderly couple living in rustic seclusion; "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Quarrelled with Ivan Nikiforovich," one of Gogol’s most famous comic stories; and "The Overcoat," widely considered a masterpiece of form.


Namesake
Jhumpa Lahiri
0739315811
August 2004
Audio
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The Sexual Labyrinth of Nikolai Gogol
Simon Karlinsky
0226425274
Feb 1992
Paperback
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Book Description
Through careful textual readings of Gogol's most famous works, Karlinsky argues that Gogol's homosexual orientation--which Gogol himself could not accept or forgive in himself--may provide the missing key to the riddle of Gogol's personality.

"A brilliant new biography that will long be prized for its illuminating psychological insights into Gogol's actions, its informative readings of his fiction and drama, and its own stylistic grace and vivacity."--Edmund White, Washington Post Book World




The Complete Tales of Nikolai Gogol, Volume II
Nikolai Gogol
0226300692
January 1983
Paperback
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Book Description
Volume 2 of The Complete Tales includes Gogol's Mirgorod stories—among them that masterpiece of grotesque comedy, "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Quarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich," the wonderfully satiric "Old World Landowners," and the Cossak epic "Taras Bulba." Here also is "The Nose," Gogol's final effort in the realm of the fantastic, as well as "The Coach," "The Portrait" (in its final version), and the most influential of his Petersburg stories, "The Overcoat."



Dead Souls
Nikolai Vasil'evich Gogol
0300060998
Feb 1996
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
A socially adept newcomer fluidly inserts himself into an unnamed Russian town, conquering first the drinkers, then the dignitaries. All find him amiable, estimable, agreeable. But what exactly is Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov up to?--something that will soon throw the town "into utter perplexity."

After more than a week of entertainment and "passing the time, as they say, very pleasantly," he gets down to business--heading off to call on some landowners. More pleasantries ensue before Chichikov reveals his bizarre plan. He'd like to buy the souls of peasants who have died since the last census. The first landowner looks carefully to see if he's mad, but spots no outward signs. In fact, the scheme is innovative but by no means bonkers. Even though Chichikov will be taxed on the supposed serfs, he will be...



Nikolai Gogol
Vladimir Nabokov
0811201201
November 1990
Paperback
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