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The Pickup
Nadine Gordimer
0142001422
October 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
While Nobel Prize-winner Gordimer's trenchant fiction has always achieved universal relevance in capturing apartheid and its lingering effects in South Africa, this new work attains still broader impact as she explores the condition of the world's desperate dispossessed. To Julie Summer, rebellious daughter of a rich white investment banker, the black mechanic she meets at a garage is initially merely an interesting person to add to her circle of bohemian friends. But as their relationship swiftly escalates, Julie comes to understand her lover's perilous tightrope attempts to find a country that will shelter him. Abdu, as he calls himself (it's not his real name), is an illegal immigrant from an abysmally poor Arab country. Now on the verge of deportation from South Africa, he's forced to return to his ancestral...


Get a Life
Nadine Gordimer
0374161704
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. The phrase "late work" is usually reserved for masters, and it is appropriate to this 14th novel from Gordimer, whose cruel meditations on mortality and commitment are enacted within two marriages a generation apart. Paul Bannerman, a 35-year-old activist ecologist who works to prevent development of the South African bush, is diagnosed with thyroid cancer. Following radiation treatment, he stays with his parents, Adrian and Lyndsay; his ad exec wife, Berenice (Benni), and toddler son, Nicholas, visit him, but must avoid contact with Paul while he's radioactive. During Paul's stay, Gordimer sounds the depths of Paul and Benni's connection (shallow but sometimes tender) and replays Adrian and Lyndsay's turbulent (but on the surface, placid) past together. Paul and Benni's professional lives...


The Conservationist
Nadine Gordimer
0140047166
Feb 1983
Paperback
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From AudioFile
Nadine Gordimer observes South Africa's decay largely through the internal monologues of a wealthy businessman disconnected from life. He cultivates empty affairs and the land he owns with an eye toward profit and loss. Perhaps Nadia May's straightforward narration reflects the flat, detached quality of this existence too well; her voice scarcely changes pace or emotional intensity. While this reading style suits the story's mood, it drags. Fortunately, May provides relief by skillfully adapting her mild British accent to the dialects of the various social classes. While not exciting, this presentation certainly seems true to Gordimer's vision. D.J. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.


Nadine Gordimer
Dominic Head
052147549X
January 1995
Paperback
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Book Description
In this study, which may be used as an introduction as well as by those already familiar with Gordimer's work, Dominic Head discusses each of Nadine Gordimer's novels in detail, examining the texts both as a reflection of events and situations in the real world, and as evidence of her constant rethinking of her craft. Head shows how Gordimer's typical concerns are developed through increasing stress on the politics of textuality; and he considers how her work as a whole contributes to the creation of a literature to challenge apartheid.


Burger's Daughter
Nadine Gordimer
0140055932
Nov 1980
Paperback
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From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Holly Smith
Rosa Burger grew up in a home under constant surveillance by the South African government. Her parents were detained for their political beliefs; her father died in prison, and her mother, whose health suffered from her time in jail, eventually dies. Rosa, a white South African in her early twenties, is left the only surviving member of her family. Yet even after her parents' deaths, the history of their anti-apartheid beliefs and practices have a daily impact on her life: it seems everyone has expectations of her and the government is still watching. A quiet, private person, Rosa constantly searches her memories to find herself, to grasp this heritage that weighs her down. Over a period of several years Rosa comes to understand the impact of the South African political climate on...


Skinner's Drift
Lisa Fugard
0743272994
January 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. A vivid sense of place and an effective dramatic arc distinguish this debut novel from the daughter of South African playwright Athol Fugard. After a 10-year absence—which saw the upheaval of her native country—28-year-old Eva van Rensburg returns to Johannesburg from the U.S. to tend to her estranged, dying Afrikaner father, Martin. Springboarding off Eva's discovery of her deceased mother Lorraine's diaries, Fugard seamlessly flashes back to explore Eva's childhood on Skinner's Drift, the farm where she grew up. The characters and landscape come sharply to life: Lorraine's dissatisfaction, Martin's struggles to keep the farm afloat, the increased tensions as soldiers arrive and barricades are erected along the border with Botswana. At the heart of the story is young Eva and her...


My Son's Story
Nadine Gordimer
0140159754
Dec 1991
Large Print Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Nobel Prize-winning author Gordimer's story of segregated South Africa focuses on Sonny, a black teacher whose revolutionary activities, imprisonment and extramarital affair with a white human rights activist profoundly affect his family. According to PW , "The novel is eloquent in its understated prose and anguished understanding of moral complexities." Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Gordimer's new novel, about a colored South African family ravaged by the father's affair with a white human rights advocate, probes with breathtaking power and precision the complexities of "love, love/hate," and the interplay of public and private reality. First-person narration shows son Will's struggle to deal with confusion and bitterness after...


July's People
Nadine Gordimer
0140061401
July 1982
Paperback
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Book Review
Not all whites in South Africa are outright racists. Some, like Bam and Maureen Smales in Nadine Gordimer's thrilling and powerful novel July's People, are sensitive to the plights of blacks during the apartheid state. So imagine their quandary when the blacks stage a full-scale revolution that sends the Smaleses scampering into isolation. The premise of the book is expertly crafted; it speaks much about the confusing state of affairs of South Africa and serves as the backbone for a terrific adventure. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

The New York Times Book Review, Anne Tyler
July's People demonstrates with breathtaking clarity the tensions and complex interdependencies between whites and blacks in South Africa. It is so flawlessly written...


Loot: And Other Stories
Nadine Gordimer
0641572735

Hardcover
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Jump and Other Short Stories
Nadine Gordimer
0140165347
Oct 1992
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Nobel Prize winner Gordimer's latest collection of short fiction brilliantly illuminates the consequences of political repression. Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Innocents who end up in bed with terrorists; children and adults entangled in the barbed wire of political events they can't control or understand. In her latest collection of stories, Gordimer revisits old but rich territory--South Africa--and other locations where the balance of order has gone awry. Gordimer's ability to transcend racial and gender barriers comes forth both in the collection as a whole and within individual stories that are told from multiple perspectives, such as "What Were You Dreaming?" This volume of fiction burns with the brilliance readers might expect...


Telling Tales
Nadine Gordimer (Editor)
0312424043
December 2004
Paperback
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From Booklist
The 21 stellar writers in this international short-story collection include five Nobel winners. All the stories were chosen by the writers themselves and contributed without any fee, and all profits go to fight HIV-AIDS in southern Africa. The stories are not about AIDS, but several are about war and about dying. In Njabulo Ndbele's "Death of a Son," parents fight to get their child's body from the apartheid police. "The Ultimate Safari," by Gordimer, who edited the anthology, is a searing, unforgettable account of a desperate refugee child hiding from the fancy tourists in a famous game park. In contrast, Woody Allen has contributed his hilarious New Yorker piece lampooning the financier whose kid was turned down by a prestigious Manhattan preschool. There are also fine stories by Margaret Atwood, Hanef Kureishi,...


None to Accompany Me
Nadine Gordimer
0140250395
Oct 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Nobel Prize winner Gordimer's novel follows two couples, one black, one white, and their evolving interaction with each other and with society during the unraveling of South African apartheid. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
In the final days of the old regime in South Africa, antiapartheid activists are released from prison or return home after years of exile. Vera Stark, a white legal aid attorney representing the black community, recognizes many familiar faces from her youth, but she is shocked to see that they appear to have aged overnight. This unnerving experience causes her to reexamine her life. Known around her law firm as someone impervious to con games, Vera is ruthless in exposing her own lies and deceptions. She faces...


Nadine Gordimer Revisited (Twayne's World Authors Series No.881)
Barbara Temple-Thurston
0805746080
April 1999
Hardcover
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Book Description
Nobel Prize-winning South African novelist and short-story writer whose major themes are exile and alienation.


The House Gun
Nadine Gordimer
0140278206
Feb 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
"There is no privacy more inviolable than that of the prisoner. To visualize that cell in which he is thinking, to reach what he alone knows; that is a blank in the dark."

Privileged whites in post-apartheid South Africa, Harald and Claudia Lindgard have managed to live the better part of 50 years without ever confronting the deepest shadows in their culture or in their own souls. Though they conceive of themselves as liberal-minded, neither has ever taken any active political stand; neither has ever been in any black person's home. Harald sits on the board of an insurance company; Claudia is a compassionate doctor. Neither of them has ever been inside a courtroom before; neither has ever been inside a prison. When their architect-son, Duncan, is arrested for murder, both know that the charge is ...



Nadine Gordimer's Burger's Daughter: A Casebook
Judie Newman (Editor)
0195147162
November 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
South African writer Nadine Gordimer won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1991. Her seventh novel, Burger's Daughter, focuses upon the daughter of a white, communist Afrikaner hero. Based partly on fact, successively banned and unbanned by the South African authorities, the novel has also
become something of a test case for feminist critics of Gordimer's writing. This casebook includes an interview with and an essay by Nadine Gordimer on the novel, classic and recent critical essays, an introduction discussing biographical and historical contexts and the literary reception, and a
bibliography.


Loot and Other Stories
Nadine Gordimer
0142004685
Sept 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
As was the case with many South African writers, Gordimer's fiction benefited, ironically enough, from the stark moral contrasts created by apartheid. The nine stories in this collection show Gordimer trying to gain a fictional perspective on the new era, and there are some missteps among them as she employs heavy-handed symbolism and less-than-revelatory social observations ("They had met at a party, the customary first stage in the white middle-class ritual of mating choices"). The title story describes an earthquake that "tipped a continental shelf" and drew back the ocean over a vast expanse, so that the detritus of the past, littered over the ocean floor, has been revealed. In response, people rush down into the former ocean bed and try to pry up treasure, unaware that the ocean, in a great wave, is coming...


Nadine Gordimer's Burger's Daughter: A Casebook
Judie Newman (Editor)
0195147170
December 2002
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Description
South African writer Nadine Gordimer won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1991. Her seventh novel, Burger's Daughter, focuses upon the daughter of a white, communist Afrikaner hero. Based partly on fact, successively banned and unbanned by the South African authorities, the novel has also
become something of a test case for feminist critics of Gordimer's writing. This casebook includes an interview with and an essay by Nadine Gordimer on the novel, classic and recent critical essays, an introduction discussing biographical and historical contexts and the literary reception, and a
bibliography.

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