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White Bone
Barbara Gowdy
0312264127
June 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
Barbara Gowdy has an utter affinity for the unconventional. In the title story of We So Seldom Look on Love, necrophilia is exquisite rather than execrable, and her wildly funny--and wildly affecting--novel Mister Sandman invites us into the hearts and minds of Toronto's least normal and most loving family. With The White Bone Gowdy continues her exploration of extraordinary lives, but this time human beings ("hindleggers") are on the periphery. And we're grateful when they're not around, since this gives her four-legged characters--elephants--a chance to survive.

The White Bone opens with five family trees. Gowdy's pachyderms include an orphaned visionary, She-Spurns (more familiarly known as Mud), and the "fine-scenter" She-Deflates, not to mention nurse cow She-Soothes and the bull Tall Time. (Though Gowdy's...



Romantic
Barbara Gowdy
0312423241
May 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In her previous novels (The White Bone; Mr. Sandman; etc), Gowdy's imagination blazed new trails, melding bizarre characters into memorable situations. This novel is as beautifully written as its predecessors, but more traditional than the Canadian writer's usual fiction. She examines the mysteries of love and its absence in two damaged children whose adult lives remain shadowed by their early experiences. In the early 1960s in Toronto, when she is 10, narrator Louise Kirk falls in love with a new neighbor boy named Abelard, the adopted son of the Richter family. Louise's mother, a former beauty queen who said things like, "Nobody would believe you're my daughter," abandoned Louise and her passive father a year ago, and Louise prays that the Richters will adopt her, too. Louise has oceans of love to lavish and...


Mister Sandman
Barbara Gowdy
0156005778
December 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
This riotous account of "the family unit" was a smash hit in Europe, Canada, and England. In the Times Literary Supplement, author Margaret Atwood (The Handmaid's Tale) praised Barbara Gowdy's novel as surprising and delightful, containing moments "at the same time preposterous and strangely moving." The Canary family guards many secrets, including the mystery of tiny daughter, Joan, who was dropped on her head at birth and has never spoken. Joan plays the piano like Mozart, yet has never had a lesson. The outrageous hilarity rises into a climax that creates a stunning new definition of family togetherness. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
The Canarys are not your typical family. Gordon and Doris are the parents of...


Romantic
Barbara Gowdy
0805071903
April 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In her previous novels (The White Bone; Mr. Sandman; etc), Gowdy's imagination blazed new trails, melding bizarre characters into memorable situations. This novel is as beautifully written as its predecessors, but more traditional than the Canadian writer's usual fiction. She examines the mysteries of love and its absence in two damaged children whose adult lives remain shadowed by their early experiences. In the early 1960s in Toronto, when she is 10, narrator Louise Kirk falls in love with a new neighbor boy named Abelard, the adopted son of the Richter family. Louise's mother, a former beauty queen who said things like, "Nobody would believe you're my daughter," abandoned Louise and her passive father a year ago, and Louise prays that the Richters will adopt her, too. Louise has oceans of love to lavish and...


We so Seldom Look on Love
Barbara Gowdy
1883642000
May 1997
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
From the author of the blockbuster Mister Sandman comes a gathering of unusual characters captured in the outrageous and humorous situations for which Barbara Gowdy has become famous. Teasing the taboos, Gowdy creates a marriage dialogue between a woman and her transsexual fiancé, who she thought was a man, and litigation between Samuel and Simon who share the same two-headed body. She peoples her stories with Siamese twins, a necrophile, and a pathetically lonely exhibitionist. And she brilliantly illustrates how uncomfortably close a connection comedy has to human suffering. The title story has been adapted into a movie called "Kissed.

From Publishers Weekly
These eight short stories employ both satire and morbid humor to explore the lives of emotionally and physically...


Der Weibe Knochen
Barbara Gowdy
3888972191

Hardcover
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Falling Angels
Barbara Gowdy
1569471169
April 1998
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Canadian writer Gowdy's ( Through the Green Valley ) second novel offers many satisfactions. Scrupulously and evocatively wrought, with fully formed characters, it poses but does not quite resolve an intriguing mystery rooted in character and fate. The book opens in 1969, at a funeral of a woman who either jumped or fell from the roof of her track house. The time frame then shifts to a decade earlier, when the woman's daughters discover that years before she had thrown or dropped an infant son over Niagara Falls. The girls--Norma, Lou and Sandy--are fascinated by this unknown sibling and by a parent who spends her life drunk, facing a TV, while the girls' father, a used-car salesman, maintains household order, such as it is. One Christmas, he promises a trip to Disneyland but instead builds, with Norma's help, a...


The Heart Is It's Own Reason
Natalee Caple
1895837251
September 2006
Paperback
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The New York Times Book Review, William Ferguson
She has an unsettling ability to combine the atrocious and the comic.

Book Description
The stories...deal with some of the darkest areas of the human psyche; she has an unsettling ability to combine the atrocious and the comic...moving...arresting. New Your Times Book Review

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One on One: The Imprint Interviews
Leanna Crouch
189589719X
January 1995
Paperback
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The Ottawa Citizen
"One on One is a valuable document."

Book Description
Selected and edited by the producer of Imprint, Leanna Crouch, here are nineteen of the best interviews (with top international and Canadian writers) from Canada's most lively literary TV show. Daring, highly original, and often controversial, these are critical investigations into the essence of great literature.

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When Words Deny the World
Stephen Henighan
088984240X
July 2002
Paperback
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Books in Canada
`Henighan is a writer who respects his material, and offers us close and convincing observation.'

Globe and Mail
`... beautiful, fresh writing, which insightfully explores its territory.'

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