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She Says
Venus Khoury-Ghata
1555973833
April 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
"Living in Lebanon, I wouldn't have written books; I would have had children cooked" writes Parisian ex-pat Venus Khoury-Ghata as a partial answer to why she writes in French. She Says, translated and introduced by Marilyn Hacker, comprises two poem sequences, "She Says/ Elle Dit" and "Words/ Les Mots," presented with French en face, while "Their voices alone pass through all obstacles." Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

—Pleiades
"Khoury-Ghata effectively and convincingly leaves the language she ‘lives in’ for the one that now lives in her."

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Squares and Courtyards
Marilyn Hacker
0393048306
Jan 2000
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Dailiness and disease fuel the award-winning Hacker's ninth collection of poetry: a grim, painstaking survey of the effects of cancer and HIV on the author's wide circle of loved ones. Hacker conveys a strength of will with an evenness of tone, one that can handle difficult material while offsetting some of the more telegraphed formalism. She is at her strongest when most stark and direct, as in "Twelfth Floor West": "The new bruise on/ her thigh was baffling. They left an armchair/ facing the window: an unspoken goal." The book is separated into two sections, the longer of which, "Scars on Paper," contains 19 shorter poems that harbor some heavy-handed imagery ("She herself/ was now a box of ashes on a shelf/ whose sixteen-year-old-shadow mugged at you/ next to a Beatles poster in your blue/ disheveled...


Here There Was Once a Country
Venus Khoury-Ghata
0932440894
July 2001
Paperback
·
 
Ploughshares, spring 2001
A searing translation .... Hacker luminously brings to life Khoury-Ghata's intimate, mysterious, and unique voice.

Book Description
Lebanese writer Venus Khoury-Ghata, who lives in France and has won many of France's major literary prizes, blends French surrealism with Arabic poetry's communal narrative mode in three stunning poetic sequences, presented here in distinguished translations by Marilyn Hacker.

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Desesperanto: Poems, 1999-2002
Marilyn Hacker
0393054187
April 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Combining lucid, almost chatty autobiography, outspoken progressive politics and a casual mastery of elaborate forms, Hacker's work has won admiration for poems about city life, and (more recently) for translations of Francophone poets. All those skills receive a renewed airing in this confident 10th collection, which opens with an elegy to June Jordan and closes with elegiac sonnets, blank verse, a ghazal and even a canzone. Hacker's title fuses "despair" and Esperanto, and her book in some sense tries for both. Included are a chain of informative sonnets depicting Parisian streets and scenes: "Rue Beaurepaire" considers the "retired mail clerks, philoprogenitive/ Chinese textiles workers, Tunisian grocers" who keep a drug users' clinic from opening, while "Troiseme Sans Ascenceur" starts from "A square of...


Birds and Bison
Claire Malroux
1931357250
October 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Claire Malroux breaks words up the way she'd split flint, grinds them like marble into dust. In another poem she is the awkward alchemist, brewing her own love. In still another, "the book unwrites itself, whiter than night." Marilyn Hacker's marvelous translations keep pace with Malroux's doings and undoings, makings and unmakings: Hacker catches the flash, the violence, the tenderness, the fleshliness and the airiness of Malroux's paradoxical art.--Rosanna Warren The personal and universal cataclysms in Claire Malroux's poetry--a maelstrom of love, torment and sweetness--are viewed as through the calm lens of a dream. All is surging, hushed, violently human. Marilyn Hacker's gifted translation captures the tone flawlessly. --John Ashbery Claire Malroux writes a poetry fresh as bird-cries at dawn and yet venerable...


Love, Death, and the Changing of the Seasons
Marilyn Hacker
0393312259
Mar 1995
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Inspired by passion for one of her poetry studentsRachel of the "leonine hair"Hacker poured out this extraordinary, long sonnet sequence, with an occasional villanelle thrown in, over the course of their yearlong, mostly long-distance love affair. Since the lovers are often apart, the book is as much a personal diary cum colorful travelogue (during this time Hacker commutes with her young daughter between Manhattan's Upper West Side, Paris and Venice) as it is an account of lust, ecstasy, yearning, jealousy and betrayal. These sonnets are graphic, colloquial and immediate; Hacker's command of the straitening, fixed form, which often seems archaic and empty when used by other poets, is a stunning achievement. Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable...


Desesperanto: Poems 1999-2002
Marilyn Hacker
0393326306
January 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Combining lucid, almost chatty autobiography, outspoken progressive politics and a casual mastery of elaborate forms, Hacker's work has won admiration for poems about city life, and (more recently) for translations of Francophone poets. All those skills receive a renewed airing in this confident 10th collection, which opens with an elegy to June Jordan and closes with elegiac sonnets, blank verse, a ghazal and even a canzone. Hacker's title fuses "despair" and Esperanto, and her book in some sense tries for both. Included are a chain of informative sonnets depicting Parisian streets and scenes: "Rue Beaurepaire" considers the "retired mail clerks, philoprogenitive/ Chinese textiles workers, Tunisian grocers" who keep a drug users' clinic from opening, while "Troiseme Sans Ascenceur" starts from "A square of...


Winter Numbers
Marilyn Hacker
0393313735
Jan 1996
Paperback
·
 
Amazon.com
Marilyn Hacker's Winter Numbers is a meditation on death, a collection of painful poems in the wake of losing loved ones to AIDS and cancer. The numbers referred to here are the metronomic beats of passing time, the mile markers on life's journey, the months remaining in a doctor's grim prognosis. The only solace is in connection, as Hacker writes in Year's End: "Underneath the numbers, how lives are braided." Highly recommended for the mortal.

From Publishers Weekly
This seventh volume of poems by NBA winner Hacker was nominated for an NBCC. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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First Cities: Collected Early Poems, 1960-1979: Presentation Piece, Separations, Taking Notice
Marilyn Hacker
039332432X
April 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The first three books of one of our best poets, including her National Book Award-winning volume Presentation Piece, plus Separations and Taking Notice. "The wonder of Marilyn Hacker's poems...is that she insists upon the rawness of experience and the metamorphosis of form with equal fervor and makes them both speak with the same voice. The result, again and again, is a poem of intense intimacy, beauty and authority."—W. S. Merwin

About the Author
Marilyn Hacker lives in Paris and New York, where she teaches at City College of New York.


Garden of Exile
Aleida Rodriguez
1889330337
October 1999
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Neither especially ground-breaking nor ambitious, Rodr!guez's debut nevertheless has charms: some inhere in its Spanish-and-English felicities, others emerge from the life story the poems tell. Having fled, at age nine, her native Cuba, Rodr!guez is now an inquisitive bilingual lesbian freelance writer in Los Angeles. Her frequent meditations on words and languages can become both precious and self-righteous: she sighs, "how difficult it is to work with words," and declares, "This pitch/ of mine has dictatorial tones but made/ of nobler stuff, I hope, if it teaches/ that those who can, do, and those who can't, bitch." Rodr!guez offers a smorgasbord of forms, among them sonnets, a sestina, a shaped poem, a recipe-poem ("Risotto Ariosto"), and prose poetry. Her free-verse cadence suggests Elizabeth Bishop's, while...


Squares and Courtyards
Marilyn Hacker
0393320952
Jan 2001
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Dailiness and disease fuel the award-winning Hacker's ninth collection of poetry: a grim, painstaking survey of the effects of cancer and HIV on the author's wide circle of loved ones. Hacker conveys a strength of will with an evenness of tone, one that can handle difficult material while offsetting some of the more telegraphed formalism. She is at her strongest when most stark and direct, as in "Twelfth Floor West": "The new bruise on/ her thigh was baffling. They left an armchair/ facing the window: an unspoken goal." The book is separated into two sections, the longer of which, "Scars on Paper," contains 19 shorter poems that harbor some heavy-handed imagery ("She herself/ was now a box of ashes on a shelf/ whose sixteen-year-old-shadow mugged at you/ next to a Beatles poster in your blue/ disheveled...


Poetry to Heal Your Blues
MQ Publications (Editor)
1840726687
December 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
It can be hard to share your pain with others when the words for such raw emotions seem impossible to express. When you're deep into the blues, and your world feels dark, find a quiet place, open the pages of this beautiful book, and let the healing power of poetry pour into your soul. What you will discover in this wonderful collection are 100 poems that will take your blues away. They have been chosen with care and thought from the abundant resources of American and international writing. Favorite poets of the past such as Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Wallace Stevens stand alongside the newer voices of Robert Bly, Louise Glick, W.S. Merwin, Pablo Neruda, Galway Kinnell, Jane Kenyon, Donald Hall, Marilyn Hacker, Dorianne Laux, James Wright, and others. Though they all speak with different voices, these poets...


Selected Poems, 1965-1990
Marilyn Hacker
0393036758
September 1994
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Marilyn Hacker's dark, complex poetic vision has a strange, often formal, beauty to it. Yet, when she writes in Living in the Moment: "I try to be a woman I could love./ I am probably wrong, asking/ you to stay . . ." one feels a very elemental tension between hope and fear, self-loathing and the need for love. It's a tangled inner life that Hacker is opening up for our inspection, and these are beautiful and brave poems. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Tracing Hacker's (Assumptions) poetic development here will make an intriguing journey for both new and familiar readers of this leader of the feminist/lesbian poetry movement. Hacker's signature style-passionate, technically deft-is spotlighted in early poems such as "Elegy,"...


White Elephants
Reetika Vazirani
0807068330
Aug 2001
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
"Culture shock is not your reflex leaving the dock;/ it is when you have been a law-abiding citizen/for more than ten years: when someone asks your name/ and the name of your religion and your first thought is/ I don't know." With those lines, found in the opening pages of this winner of the 1995 Barnard New Women Poets Prize, Vazirani clearly enunciates her task: to sum up the immigrant's experience in precise and evocative language. In the poems that follow, she shows how much the old world insinuates itself into the new. From Part 1, "Mrs. Biswas," where that noble matriarch "scolds a god, possibly Mahakali, the Great One, for/ tangling/ her boot-black hair in a comb" and reflects that she must buy "eighteen nylon saris/ and Walkmans for my India trip," through Part 2, "The Rajdhani Express," ("I have lived here...


Selected Poems, 1965-1990
Marilyn Hacker
0393313492
October 1995
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Marilyn Hacker's dark, complex poetic vision has a strange, often formal, beauty to it. Yet, when she writes in Living in the Moment: "I try to be a woman I could love./ I am probably wrong, asking/ you to stay . . ." one feels a very elemental tension between hope and fear, self-loathing and the need for love. It's a tangled inner life that Hacker is opening up for our inspection, and these are beautiful and brave poems.

From Publishers Weekly
Tracing Hacker's (Assumptions) poetic development here will make an intriguing journey for both new and familiar readers of this leader of the feminist/lesbian poetry movement. Hacker's signature style-passionate, technically deft-is spotlighted in early poems such as "Elegy," paying tribute to the agonized "sandpaper/ velvet" throat...

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