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Pharmacology: Reviews & Rationales (Prentice Hall Nursing Reviews & Rationales Series)
Mary Ann Hogan
013030462X
May 2004
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
Essential for course review and NCLEX review, this resource is a complete, concentrated outline of pharmacology. Each chapter contains objectives, pre- and post-tests with rationales, vocabulary review, practice to pass exercises, critical thinking case studies, as well as NCLEX alerts. Unique to Prentice Hall's Nursing Reviews & Rationales Series, a comprehensive CD-ROM and Companion Website, available free of charge, provide additional review. Content includes all of the "need-to-know" facts covering medications including safety, anti-infection, blood-modifying, gastrointestinal, neurological, psychiatric, and much more. For nursing students in need of a resource that focuses on course review or NCLEX review as well as nursing professionals looking to familiarize themselves with a new specialty. Buy 5 Get 1...


Face to Face
Linda Hogan
0865477256
Sept 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
From Judith Roche's poem about angels to Mohja Kahf's reflections on growing up Muslim in Indiana and New Jersey, this collection on feminine spirituality is eloquent, elegant and satisfyingly multicultural. Established literary luminaries, like Mary Gordon, are found alongside more obscure but equally skilled writers like Suzanne Edison. As in the editors' previous anthology, The Sweet Breathing of Plants, many of the pieces gathered here connect the natural and spiritual worlds. (This is perhaps best exemplified by the excerpt from Terry Tempest Williams's Refuge, which draws together reflections on Mormonism and the Great Salt Lake, and by the short, astounding "Epiphany," in which the late poet Pem Kremer writes, "she saw You once as prairie grass.... She says when she can't pray/She calls up prairie grass.")...


The Art of Civilized Conversation: A Guide to Expressing Yourself with Style and Grace
Margaret Shepherd
0767921690
December 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
There is so much information in this manual that the easily intimidated may decide that silence is sometimes better than bearing in mind all the rules of conversation. Shepherd, a calligrapher and writer (The Art of the Handwritten Note), covers almost every type of social or intimate situation, including how to make introductions, requests, apologies, and a variety of tips for speaking with children, elderly people and in-laws. Shepherd also addresses those difficult moments when we all have trouble knowing what to say: she advocates first checking when a bedridden friend will welcome visitors and allowing a seriously ill person the freedom to express anger at his or her condition. Not all will agree with her argument that it's appropriate to speak in a louder voice to someone whose first language is not...


Power
Linda Hogan
0393046362
May 1998
Hardcover
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Book Review
In this coming-of-age story, a 16-year-old Native American girl named Omishito (a Tiaga name meaning One Who Watches) inadvertently witnesses the hunting and killing of her clan's sacred animal, the Florida panther. What makes this especially troubling and complicated for Omishito is that her beloved spiritual mentor, Ama, is the panther's murderer. At first, Omishito cannot fathom why Ama, a tribal elder who still practices the old powers, would commit this sacrilege and risk the wrath of her tribe and country. (Unlike the Tiaga tribe, the Florida panther is considered endangered and therefore federally protected.) Through seamless storytelling and expert scene building, Linda Hogan reveals the many-layered mysteries inherent in this novel (based on a true story) as well as the powerful forces that endanger Native Americans...


From the Center of Tradition: Critical Perspectives on Linda Hogan
Barbara J. Cook
0870817388
October 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
Linda Hogan, a Chickasaw poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, and activist, is widely considered to be one of the most influential and provocative Native American figures on the contemporary literary landscape. Although her work has been the focus of numerous essays and conference presentations, until now there has not been a collection of critical essays based solely on her work. This collection’s ten unpublished essays and one interview with Hogan reflect the most current and productive critical commentary on Linda Hogan’s texts. Hogan writes about community and the traditional indigenous relationships to the land and its plants and animals. The critical essays in From the Center of Tradition place Hogan’s work at the heart of current discussions in American literature. Rather than focus on a single...


Solar Storms
Linda Hogan
0684825392
February 1997
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In her luminous, quietly compelling second novel, Hogan, a Chickasaw poet and writer (whose first novel, Mean Spirit, was a finalist for the Pulitzer), ties a young woman's coming-of-age to the fate of the natural world she comes to inhabit. Angela Jensen, a troubled 17-year-old, narrates the tale of her return to Adam's Rib, an island town in the boundary waters between Minnesota and Canada. Tucked into a pristine landscape of countless islands, wild animals and desperately harsh winters, it's her Native American family's homeland. As a child, Angela was abandoned by her mother, Hannah Wing, but not before Hannah had permanently scarred half of Angela's face; earlier, Hannah herself had been separated from her family and unspeakably abused. In Adam's Rib, Angela is reunited with her great-grandmother, Agnes...


Native Universe: Voices of Indian America
Gerald McMaster (Editor)
0641698232

Hardcover
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Intimate Nature
Barbara Peterson
0449003000
Apr 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
As any lover of animals will tell you, creatures of the natural world bring inspiration and spiritual insight to their human admirers. In this collection of essays, ponderings, poems, and interviews, which includes contributions from Jane Goodall, Barbara Kingsolver, Ursula Le Guin, and Tess Gallagher, readers are able to glimpse the personal yet profoundly universal impact of animals on women's lives. Even more, they can experience the relational and spiritual feminine model for animal study. In their introduction, editors Linda Hogan, Deena Metzger, and Brenda Peterson explain, "This strong sense of compassion that many women bring to the study, celebration, and love of animals has been world changing and visionary. We can now say that the old guard of detached science is being replaced with the new...


The Woman Who Watches over the World: A Native Memoir
Linda Hogan
0393323056
May 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In a Cree Indian story, Wolverine convinced the animals of the world to keep their eyes closed, so humans wouldn't see their "inner fire" and try to steal it. People, too, can close their eyes and protect their inner fires even if it means those fires may burn them, observes Hogan (Mean Spirit), an award-winning Chickasaw novelist and poet. She herself was seared by such bottled-up fire throughout her girlhood. Raised by an alcoholic, army sergeant father and a pathologically silent mother, she turned first, at age 12, to a steady older lover, then to alcohol. Her adult life, too, has been a series of struggles adopting two seriously disturbed children, enduring amnesia following a head injury and coping with her fibromyalgia but she has learned from each experience to find beauty and grace even in darkness....


Power
Linda Hogan
0393319687
October 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
In this coming-of-age story, a 16-year-old Native American girl named Omishito (a Tiaga name meaning One Who Watches) inadvertently witnesses the hunting and killing of her clan's sacred animal, the Florida panther. What makes this especially troubling and complicated for Omishito is that her beloved spiritual mentor, Ama, is the panther's murderer. At first, Omishito cannot fathom why Ama, a tribal elder who still practices the old powers, would commit this sacrilege and risk the wrath of her tribe and country. (Unlike the Tiaga tribe, the Florida panther is considered endangered and therefore federally protected.) Through seamless storytelling and expert scene building, Linda Hogan reveals the many-layered mysteries inherent in this novel (based on a true story) as well as the powerful forces that endanger Native Americans...


Dwellings
Linda Hogan
0684830337
Sept 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Novelist (Mean Spirit) and poet (Seeing Through the Sun) Hogan branches into nonfiction with this slender volume of meditations on the natural world. She successfully couples a poet's appreciation of phrasing and rhythm with Native American sensibilities and stories. Throughout, Hogan exquisitely examines both natural and internal landscapes. She writes beautifully about animals without anthropomorphizing them and, in so doing, explores what it means to be human. Herself a Chickasaw, Hogan is able to bring a diverse cultural perspective to her analysis of how people relate to nature. She concludes, "We must wonder what of value can ever be spoken from lives that are lived outside of life, without a love or respect for the land and other lives." Although 11 of the 16 essays have been previously published, they...


Mean Spirit
Linda Hogan
0804108633
November 1991
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Set in Oklahoma during the oil boom of the early 1920s, this brooding and profoundly moving first novel focuses on two doomed Osage Indian families, the Blankets and the Grayclouds. The brutal murder of Grace Blanket, owner of oil-rich land, witnessed in horror by her young daughter Nola and Nola's friend Rena Graycloud, is only the first of a series of violent events designed to coerce the tribes and put their lands into the hands of the oil barons. Justice is slow and ambiguous. When Stace Red Hawk, a policeman with the U.S. Bureau of Investigation, finds his inquiries blocked and his efforts frustrated by evasive and corrupt federal officials, he travels from Washington, D.C., to Oklahoma to investigate firsthand. Soon, like many of the Indian families depicted here, Stace is torn between the glitter of...


Sightings
Brenda Peterson
0792241029
July 2003
Paperback
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From Booklist
The gray whale is probably the most watched of all the whales as their yearly migration along the Pacific coast brings them close to the many watchers on shore and in boats. Peterson, a nature writer, and Hogan, a Native American poet, spent seven years following the whales' migration and talking with people affected by the whales. The two voices of the authors are rendered in different type, with Hogan's more philosophical musing on the relationship between human and whale juxtaposed with Peterson's more reporterly presentation of gray whale natural history and of the people who interact with them. Starting with a visit to the calving grounds in San Ignacio Lagoon, Baja California, the authors socialize with the whales known as "friendlies" because they choose to approach people. Other sections follow the migration,...


Native Universe: Voices of Indian America
Gerald McMaster (Editor)
0792259947
September 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Published for the September 21 opening of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian on Washington Mall, the three main sections of this majestic book ("Our Universes," "Our Peoples" and "Our Lives") feature more than 300 color illustrations of Native artworks, from Inka to Iroquois, with poems by N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, Linda Hogan and others; extensive essays on Native mythology, history and identity; and even an excerpt from the Sherman Alexie script for Smoke Signals. The essays, which range from straightforward histories to deeply felt testimonials, are written by a wide range of Native cultural personages, including Wilma Mankiller (the first woman to be elected by the Cherokee Nation as its principal chief), Gabrielle Tayac (daughter of medicine man Chief Turkey Tayac in the...


Confronting the Truth
Linda Hogan
0809139812
Nov 2000
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Hogan (Univ. of Leeds, UK; not the Native American writer of the same name), who has written previously on feminist theology and ethics, explores the historical development of conscience in Catholic theology. She demonstrates how divergent views and moral distinctions have evolved and led to opposite schools of thought affecting contemporary theology. Hogan emphasizes the complexity of issues throughout the book and proposes that a personalist model of conscience is already rooted in Catholic tradition. She covers the roles of reason, intuition, emotion, and imagination in the processes of conscience dynamics, notes the central role of the faithful and the value of the "loyal opposition" in developing the recommendations of Vatican II, and suggests that existing tradition can provide the basis for a renewed...


Practical Computing
Lynn Hogan
0131441337
January 2004
Textbook Paperback
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