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Mules and Men by Zora Neale Hurston
Zora Neale Hurston
0878912282
June 1999
Paperback
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From AudioFile
One could almost accuse Ruby Dee of being a witch doctor. Her narration of this seminal collection of black American folklore is nothing short of extraordinary. Using varying accents and dialects of the Deep South (Eatonville, Florida), she tells stories, she interrupts, she cuts up, she teases, she banters--she inhabits, not mere characters, but groups of characters--friends and neighbors gathered on the porch, in the dance hall, in a card game, hanging around the country store. Her off-the-beat vocal rhythms and prodigious energy create a narrative drive that propels the listener. And the stories are a treasure--traditional tales, explanatory tales, jokes and one-upmanship contests--here are ordinary people finding joy and comedy in everyday experience. As later African-American literature became increasingly militant,...


Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston
0060931418
Dec 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
At the height of the Harlem Renaissance during the 1930s, Zora Neale Hurston was the preeminent black woman writer in the United States. She was a sometime-collaborator with Langston Hughes and a fierce rival of Richard Wright. Her stories appeared in major magazines, she consulted on Hollywood screenplays, and she penned four novels, an autobiography, countless essays, and two books on black mythology. Yet by the late 1950s, Hurston was living in obscurity, working as a maid in a Florida hotel. She died in 1960 in a Welfare home, was buried in an unmarked grave, and quickly faded from literary consciousness until 1975 when Alice Walker almost single-handedly revived interest in her work.

Of Hurston's fiction, Their Eyes Were Watching God is arguably the best-known and perhaps the most controversial. The novel follows...



Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston
0060838671
January 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
At the height of the Harlem Renaissance during the 1930s, Zora Neale Hurston was the preeminent black woman writer in the United States. She was a sometime-collaborator with Langston Hughes and a fierce rival of Richard Wright. Her stories appeared in major magazines, she consulted on Hollywood screenplays, and she penned four novels, an autobiography, countless essays, and two books on black mythology. Yet by the late 1950s, Hurston was living in obscurity, working as a maid in a Florida hotel. She died in 1960 in a Welfare home, was buried in an unmarked grave, and quickly faded from literary consciousness until 1975 when Alice Walker almost single-handedly revived interest in her work.

Of Hurston's fiction, Their Eyes Were Watching God is arguably the best-known and perhaps the most controversial. The novel follows...



Their Eyes Were Watching God
Megan Ashe
0764586610
Dec 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
The original CliffsNotes study guides offer expert commentary on major themes, plots, characters, literary devices, and historical background. The latest generation of titles in this series also feature glossaries and visual elements that complement the classic, familiar format.

In CliffsNotes on Their Eyes Were Watching God, you discover the work of one of the 20th century's first African-American female authors – Zora Neale Hurston. In the novel, Janie Crawford returns to her hometown in Florida and relates to her friend Pheoby the tragic story of her 40-year search for love and respect.

Chapter summaries and commentaries take you through Janie's journey, and critical essays give you insight into the novel's themes and structure, as well as Hurston's use of figurative...



Their Eyes Were Watching God (SparkNotes)
SparkNotes Editors
1586634143
January 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
At the height of the Harlem Renaissance during the 1930s, Zora Neale Hurston was the preeminent black woman writer in the United States. She was a sometime-collaborator with Langston Hughes and a fierce rival of Richard Wright. Her stories appeared in major magazines, she consulted on Hollywood screenplays, and she penned four novels, an autobiography, countless essays, and two books on black mythology. Yet by the late 1950s, Hurston was living in obscurity, working as a maid in a Florida hotel. She died in 1960 in a Welfare home, was buried in an unmarked grave, and quickly faded from literary consciousness until 1975 when Alice Walker almost single-handedly revived interest in her work.

Of Hurston's fiction, Their Eyes Were Watching God is arguably the best-known and perhaps the most controversial. The novel follows...



Their Eyes Were Watching God CD
Zora Neale Hurston
0060776536
Dec 2004
Audio Compact Disc - Unabridged
·
 
Book Description

Their Eyes Were Watching God, an American classic, is the luminous and haunting novel about Janie Crawford, a Southern Black woman in the 1930s, whose journey from a free-spirited girl to a woman of independence and substance has inspired writers and readers for close to 70 years.

This poetic, graceful love story, rooted in Black folk traditions and steeped in mythic realism, celebrates boldly and brilliantly African-American culture and heritage. And in a powerful, mesmerizing narrative, it pays quiet tribute to a Black woman who, though constricted by the times, still demanded to be heard.

Originally published in 1937 and long out of print, the book was reissued in 1975 and nearly three decades later Their Eyes Were Watching God is considered a seminal novel in American fiction.

Performed by Ruby Dee ...



Speak, So You Can Speak Again: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston
Lucy Anne Hurston
0385493754
October 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This photo- and facsimile-filled volume offers a marvelous multi-media introduction to one of the most celebrated American writers of the 20th century. Readers can follow Zora Neale Hurston’s life journey, from Eatonville, Fla., (map of the town included) where she was born in 1891, to her years as a student at Howard University (read her first published story, "John Redding Goes to Sea," reproduced from the campus literary magazine), and then to New York City and Barnard College, where she was the only black student at the time. Copies of typescripts of poems (some never before published) are included, and her success as part of the Harlem Renaissance is touched upon, as well (read her notes for various works and see the cover of the Saturday Review featuring Hurston). But perhaps the item that most brings...


Wrapped in Rainbows
Valerie Boyd
0743253299
Feb 2004
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This study of the influential African American novelist/folklorist by the arts editor of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution is billed as the first definitive biography.Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From The New Yorker
The novelist, folklorist, and playwright Zora Neale Hurston lived a life easily equal to the drama of her best novels. Although her ambitions took her far from the all-black town of Eatonville, Florida, where she grew up, her intellectual and emotional roots remained in its watery environs, where telling tall tales was a way of life. She told a few tall tales herself, especially in her autobiography, "Dust Tracks on a Road." But what can lying about one's age or about...


Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography
Zora Neale Hurston
0060854081
January 2006
Paperback
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--The New Yorker
"Warm, witty, imaginative, and down-to-earth by turns, this is a rich and winning book by one of our genuine, Grade A, folk writers." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

First published in 1942 at the height of her popularity, Dust Tracks on a Road is Zora Neale Hurston's candid, funny, bold, and poignant autobiography, an imaginative and exuberant account of her rise from childhood poverty in the rural South to a prominent place among the leading artists and intellectuals of the Harlem Renaissance. As compelling as her acclaimed fiction, Hurston's very personal literary self-portrait offers a revealing, often audacious glimpse into the life -- public and private -- of an extraordinary artist, anthropologist,...



Lies and Other Tall Tales
Zora Neale Hurston
0060006552
Oct 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 3 Up–Myers joins the growing list of writers and illustrators who are mining the southern folklore collected by Hurston in the 1930s. His jocular introduction avers that, Way, way back in the day,/Back when George Washington's hair on the one-dollar bill hadn't yet turned white./Back when computers ran on steam power,/Back when cellular phones had rotary dials,…/There were lies,/Real lies…. The lies are set here in a bantering, conversational scheme as tellers try to top one another in traditional exchanges. (If you haven't heard about it, you better ask your mama!) That reminds me of this one man. He was so mean, he greased another man and swallowed him whole. Myers captures the spoken rhythm, often incorporating the original Black English and placing some words in print of a...


Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston
0072434228
June 2000
Textbook Paperback
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Book Review
At the height of the Harlem Renaissance during the 1930s, Zora Neale Hurston was the preeminent black woman writer in the United States. She was a sometime-collaborator with Langston Hughes and a fierce rival of Richard Wright. Her stories appeared in major magazines, she consulted on Hollywood screenplays, and she penned four novels, an autobiography, countless essays, and two books on black mythology. Yet by the late 1950s, Hurston was living in obscurity, working as a maid in a Florida hotel. She died in 1960 in a Welfare home, was buried in an unmarked grave, and quickly faded from literary consciousness until 1975 when Alice Walker almost single-handedly revived interest in her work.

Of Hurston's fiction, Their Eyes Were Watching God is arguably the best-known and perhaps the most controversial. The novel follows...



Jonah's Gourd Vine
Zora Neale Hurston
0060916516
Feb 1990
Paperback
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Book Description
The first novel by the noted black novelist, folklorist, and anthropologist. Originally published in 1934, it was praised by Carl Sandburg as "a bold and beautiful book, many a page priceless and unforgettable."

About the Author
In her award-winning autobiography, Dust Trackson a Road (1942), Zora Neale Hurston claimed to have been born inEatonville, Florida, in 1901. She was, in fact, born in Notasulga, Alabama, onJanuary 7, 1891, the fifth child of John Hurston (farmer, carpenter, and Baptistpreacher) and Lucy Ann Potts (school teacher). The author of numerous books,including Their Eyes Were Watching God, Jonah's Gourd Vine, Mulesand Men, and Moses, Man of the Mountain, Hurston had achieved fameand sparked controversy as a novelist, anthropologist, outspoken...


Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life
Tiffany Ruby Patterson
1592132901
June 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
A historian hoping to reconstruct the social world of all-black towns or the segregated black sections of other towns in the South finds only scant traces of their existence. In Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life, Tiffany Ruby Patterson uses the ethnographic and literary work of Zora Neale Hurston to augment the few official documents, newspaper accounts, and family records that pertain to these places hidden from history. Hurston's ethnographies, plays, and fiction focused on the day-to-day life in all-black social spaces as well as "the Negro farthest down" in labor camps. Patterson shows how Hurston's work complements the fragmented historical record, using the folklore and stories to provide a full description of these people of these towns as active human subjects, shaped by history and shaping...


Native Son
Richard Wright
006083756X
August 2005
Paperback
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Book Review
Bigger Thomas is doomed, trapped in a downward spiral that will lead to arrest, prison, or death, driven by despair, frustration, poverty, and incomprehension. As a young black man in the Chicago of the '30s, he has no way out of the walls of poverty and racism that surround him, and after he murders a young white woman in a moment of panic, these walls begin to close in. There is no help for him--not from his hapless family; not from liberal do-gooders or from his well-meaning yet naive friend Jan; certainly not from the police, prosecutors, or judges. Bigger is debased, aggressive, dangerous, and a violent criminal. As such, he has no claim upon our compassion or sympathy. And yet...

A more compelling story than Native Son has not been written in the 20th century by an American writer. That is not to say that Richard...



Every Tongue Got to Confess
Zora Neale Hurston
0060934549
Oct 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Although Hurston is better known for her novels, particularly Their Eyes Were Watching God, she might have been prouder of her anthropological field work. In 1927, with the support of Franz Boas, the dean of American anthropologists, Hurston traveled the Deep South collecting stories from black laborers, farmers, craftsmen and idlers. These tales featured a cast of characters made famous in Joel Chandler Harris's bowdlerized Uncle Remus versions, including John (related, no doubt, to High John the Conqueror), Brer Fox and various slaves. But for Hurston these stories were more than entertainments; they represented a utopia created to offset the sometimes unbearable pressures of disenfranchisement: "Brer Fox, Brer Deer, Brer 'Gator, Brer Dawg, Brer Rabbit, Ole Massa and his wife were walking the earth like natural...


Zora Neale Hurston: Folklore, Memoirs, and Other Writings (Mules and Men, Tell My Horse, Dust Tracks on a Road, Selected Articles) (Library of America)
Zora Neale Hurston
0940450844
February 1995
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
No Black History Month celebration would be complete without Hurston, and here the venerable Library of America collects a wide range of her work. This two-volume set combines four novels with a selection of short stories; her autobiography presented in unexpurgated form for the first time; and her lesser-known anthropological writings, all of which have been restored by scholar and editor Wall. The Hurston collection is essential for all libraries.Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist
Library of America's companion to Hurston's Novels and Stories presents her nonfiction work, which is perhaps less familiar but no less important than her fiction in the body of black literature. This is the first time the unexpurgated version of her 1942...


The Six Fools
Zora Neale Hurston
0060006463
Jan 2006
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Starred Review. Grade 1-5–A fellow courts a girl, and they agree to marry. Sadly, she and her family are such fools that the young man takes off: …you are the three biggest fools that I ever laid eyes on. I'm going traveling for a year, and if I find three fools as big as you, I'll come back and we'll get married. Does he find them? Of course. This adaptation of the fool story from Hurston's Every Tongue Got to Confess (HarperCollins, 2001) is light and adept. Though Thomas doesn't describe the changes she's made, comparison with the original shows that she's added a small amount of narrative detail and dialogue, hardly altering and not cutting anything from the original. The result is wonderful in voice: rich, hilarious, and satisfying. Tanksley's oil monoprints done in a folk-art style set the...


2006 365 Meditations, Reflections & Restoratives for Women Who Do Too Much Page-A-Day Box Calendar
Anne Wilson Schaef
0761136711
June 2005
Box Calendar
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Book Description
A rock of support that women rely on year after year, this perennially bestselling calendar keeps the spirit positive with a daily empathy, smart advice, and healing humor. Learn to identify and draw from the sources of strength that are all around us. Try to let go of resentment and anger. Take a close look at the technology in your life-is it helping or controlling you? Ways to find positive outlets fro stress, banish defensiveness, and rediscover monotasking, plus quotes from Maya Angelou, Anais Nin, Oprah Winfrey, Dolly Parton, Zora Neale Hurston, and Rosalind Russell.

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