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Never Let Me Go
Kazuo Ishiguro
1400078776
March 2006
Paperback
·
 
Review
"A page turner and a heartbreaker, a tour de force of knotted tension and buried anguish.”—Time

“A Gothic tour de force. . . . A tight, deftly controlled story . . . . Just as accomplished [as The Remains of the Day] and, in a very different way, just as melancholy and alarming.”—The New York Times

"Elegaic, deceptively lovely. . . . As always, Ishiguro pulls you under." —Newsweek

“Superbly unsettling, impeccably controlled . . . . The book’s irresistible power comes from Ishiguro’s matchless ability to expose its dark heart in careful increments.” —Entertainment Weekly

Book Description
From the Booker Prize-winning author of The Remains of the Day...


Never Let Me Go
Kazuo Ishiguro
1400043395
April 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
All children should believe they are special. But the students of Hailsham, an elite school in the English countryside, are so special that visitors shun them, and only by rumor and the occasional fleeting remark by a teacher do they discover their unconventional origins and strange destiny. Kazuo Ishiguro's sixth novel, Never Let Me Go, is a masterpiece of indirection. Like the students of Hailsham, readers are "told but not told" what is going on and should be allowed to discover the secrets of Hailsham and the truth about these children on their own.

Offsetting the bizarreness of these revelations is the placid, measured voice of the narrator, Kathy H., a 31-year-old Hailsham alumna who, at the close of the 1990s, is consciously ending one phase of her life and beginning another. She is in a reflective mood, and...



Never Let Me Go
Kazuo Ishiguro
0739317970
Apr 2005
Audio Cassette - Unabridged
·
 
Book Review
All children should believe they are special. But the students of Hailsham, an elite school in the English countryside, are so special that visitors shun them, and only by rumor and the occasional fleeting remark by a teacher do they discover their unconventional origins and strange destiny. Kazuo Ishiguro's sixth novel, Never Let Me Go, is a masterpiece of indirection. Like the students of Hailsham, readers are "told but not told" what is going on and should be allowed to discover the secrets of Hailsham and the truth about these children on their own.

Offsetting the bizarreness of these revelations is the placid, measured voice of the narrator, Kathy H., a 31-year-old Hailsham alumna who, at the close of the 1990s, is consciously ending one phase of her life and beginning another. She is in a reflective mood, and...



Remains of the Day
Kazuo Ishiguro
0679731725
October 1993
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The novel's narrator, Stevens, is a perfect English butler who tries to give his narrow existence form and meaning through the self-effacing, almost mystical practice of his profession. In a career that spans the second World War, Stevens is oblivious of the real life that goes on around him -- oblivious, for instance, of the fact that his aristocrat employer is a Nazi sympathizer. Still, there are even larger matters at stake in this heartbreaking, pitch-perfect novel -- namely, Stevens' own ability to allow some bit of life-affirming love into his tightly repressed existence.

From Publishers Weekly
Greeted with high praise in England, where it seems certain to be shortlisted for the Booker Prize, Ishiguro's third novel (after An Artist of the Floating World ) is a tour de force--...


When We Were Orphans
Kazuo Ishiguro
0375724400
October 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
When 9-year-old Christopher Banks's father--a British businessman involved in the opium trade--disappears from the family home in Shanghai, the boy and his friend Akira play at being detectives: "Until in the end, after the chases, fist-fights and gun-battles around the warren-like alleys of the Chinese districts, whatever our variations and elaborations, our narratives would always conclude with a magnificent ceremony held in Jessfield Park, a ceremony that would see us, one after another, step out onto a specially erected stage ... to greet the vast cheering crowds."

But Christopher's mother also disappears, and he is sent to live in England, where he grows up in the years between the world wars to become, he claims, a famous detective. His family's fate continues to haunt him, however, and he sifts through his...



When We Were Orphans
Kazuo Ishiguro
0060824891
Mar 2005
Audio Compact Disc - Unabridged
·
 
Book Review
When 9-year-old Christopher Banks's father--a British businessman involved in the opium trade--disappears from the family home in Shanghai, the boy and his friend Akira play at being detectives: "Until in the end, after the chases, fist-fights and gun-battles around the warren-like alleys of the Chinese districts, whatever our variations and elaborations, our narratives would always conclude with a magnificent ceremony held in Jessfield Park, a ceremony that would see us, one after another, step out onto a specially erected stage ... to greet the vast cheering crowds."

But Christopher's mother also disappears, and he is sent to live in England, where he grows up in the years between the world wars to become, he claims, a famous detective. His family's fate continues to haunt him, however, and he sifts through his...



Never Let Me Go
Kazuo Ishiguro
0739317989
April 2005
Compact Disc
·
 
Book Review
All children should believe they are special. But the students of Hailsham, an elite school in the English countryside, are so special that visitors shun them, and only by rumor and the occasional fleeting remark by a teacher do they discover their unconventional origins and strange destiny. Kazuo Ishiguro's sixth novel, Never Let Me Go, is a masterpiece of indirection. Like the students of Hailsham, readers are "told but not told" what is going on and should be allowed to discover the secrets of Hailsham and the truth about these children on their own.

Offsetting the bizarreness of these revelations is the placid, measured voice of the narrator, Kathy H., a 31-year-old Hailsham alumna who, at the close of the 1990s, is consciously ending one phase of her life and beginning another. She is in a reflective mood, and...



Cosmopolitan Fictions
Katherine Stanton
0415975425
Oct 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Noting the risk that the globalizing of literary studies "may simply reinforce the developments it is attempting to examine and assess," Giles Gunn insists that critics analyze not only how the cultural material we study has been produced by globalizing trends, but also how it has subjected those trends to scrutiny. It is this work that Worldwise undertakes. The fictions studied represent and revise the global histories of the past and present--including the "indigenous or native" narratives that are, in Homi Bhabha's words, "internal to" national identity itself. These works, taking as their subjects European unification, the human rights movement, the AIDS epidemic, and the new South Africa, test the infinite demands for justice against the shifting borders of the nation, rethinking habits of feeling, modes of...


Pale View of Hills
Kazuo Ishiguro
067972267X
September 1990
Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
In his best-known book, THE REMAINS OF THE DAY, Kazuo Ishiguro advances the butler's story, not by giving, but by withholding both information and emotion. This novel is about a woman who lived in Nagasaki after the bomb was dropped. We don't hear the explosion. We don't even hear the names of the dead. And yet it's very clear that something perfectly wretched has gone on. Is still going on. Roe Kendall dramatizes so well that, after a while, I forgot to wonder why an English woman of breeding would be telling the story. Still, this throws one more curtain between the listener and the tragedy. Couldn't they have found somebody Japanese? B.H.C. © AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

...


The Remains of the Day
Kazuo Ishiguro
0613057708
Sept 1990
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
The novel's narrator, Stevens, is a perfect English butler who tries to give his narrow existence form and meaning through the self-effacing, almost mystical practice of his profession. In a career that spans the second World War, Stevens is oblivious of the real life that goes on around him -- oblivious, for instance, of the fact that his aristocrat employer is a Nazi sympathizer. Still, there are even larger matters at stake in this heartbreaking, pitch-perfect novel -- namely, Stevens' own ability to allow some bit of life-affirming love into his tightly repressed existence. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Greeted with high praise in England, where it seems certain to be shortlisted for the Booker Prize, Ishiguro's third novel...


What Was She Thinking : Notes on a Scandal
Zoe Heller
0641688792

Hardcover
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What Was She Thinking Notes on a Scandal
Zoe Heller
0312421990
June 2004
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Subtitled Notes on a Scandal, Heller's engrossing second novel (after Everything You Know) is actually the story of two inappropriate obsessions-one a consummated affair between a high school teacher and her student, the other a secret passion harbored by a dowdy spinster. Sheba Hart, a new 40ish art teacher at a London school for working-class kids, has been arrested for having a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old student, Steven Connolly. The papers are having a blast. Sheba is herself the object of fascination for her older colleague and defender, Barbara Covett, whose interest in Sheba is not overtly romantic but has an erotic-and at times malevolent-intensity. Barbara narrates the story of Sheba's affair while inadvertently revealing her own obsession and her pivotal role in the scandal. The novel is...


Artist of the Floating World
Kazuo Ishiguro
0679722661
October 1989
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In An Artist of the Floating World, Kazuo Ishiguro offers readers of the English language an authentic look at postwar Japan, "a floating world" of changing cultural behaviors, shifting societal patterns and troubling questions. Ishiguro, who was born in Nagasaki in 1954 but moved to England in 1960, writes the story of Masuji Ono, a bohemian artist and purveyor of the night life who became a propagandist for Japanese imperialism during the war. But the war is over. Japan lost, Ono's wife and son have been killed, and many young people blame the imperialists for leading the country to disaster. What's left for Ono? Ishiguro's treatment of this story earned a 1986 Whitbread Prize.

From Publishers Weekly
Like figures on a Japanese screen, the painter Masuji Ono and his...


Unconsoled
Kazuo Ishiguro
0679735879
September 1996
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A renowned pianist finds himself in a mysterious and dreamlike urban maze. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
As stylistically distinctive as his acclaimed The Remains of the Day (LJ 10/1/89), Ishiguro's newest work offers a different kind of protagonist. While Remains's butler was at odds with himself (without knowing it), prominent concert pianist Ryder is at odds with his surroundings. Ryder arrives in an unidentified European city at a bit of a loss. Everyone he meets seems to assume that he knows more than he knows, that he is well acquainted with the city and its obscure cultural crisis. A young woman he kindly consents to advise seems to have been an old lover and her son quite possibly his own; he vaguely recalls past...

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