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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
James Joyce
159308031X
August 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Two of Joyce's seminal books, now gathered in one volume. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a largely autobiographical story in which Stephen Dedalus grow into self-awareness and away from old ideas of family, national identity, and religion. Dubliners, Joyce's memorable short stories, is a group portrait of figures drawn from real-life inhabitants of his mother city.


James Joyce, Vol. 1
Richard Ellmann
0195033817
October 1983
Paperback
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Book Review
Although several biographers have thrown themselves into the breach since this magisterial book first appeared in 1959, none have come close to matching the late Richard Ellmann's achievement. To be fair, Ellmann does have some distinct advantages. For starters, there's his deep mastery of the Irish milieu--demonstrated not only in this volume but in his books on Yeats and Wilde. He's also an admirable stylist himself--graceful, witty, and happily unintimidated by his brilliant subjects. But in addition, Ellmann seems to have an uncanny grasp on Joyce's personality: his reverence for the Irishman's literary accomplishment is always balanced by a kind of bemused affection for his faults. Whether Joyce is putting the finishing touches on Ulysses, falling down drunk in the streets of Trieste, or talking dirty...


Dubliners
James Joyce
0140186476
June 1993
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Joyce's classic has been recorded before, of course, but in this new version, each of the 15 stories will be read by a different person, including writers Frank McCourt, Malachy McCourt, and Patrick McCabe, and actors Ciaran Hinds and Colm Meaney. Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From AudioFile
Jim Norton continues his interpretation of James Joyce's classic volume of short stories, originally published in 1914. Norton give us lively characterizations between narration delivered with a solemn detachment. I'm not sure this approach dovetails the author's narrative voice. Whether it does or not, it isn't particularly interesting. Y.R. © AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine-- Copyright ©...


Ulysses
James Joyce
0679722769
June 1990
Paperback
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Book Review
Ulysses has been labeled dirty, blasphemous, and unreadable. In a famous 1933 court decision, Judge John M. Woolsey declared it an emetic book--although he found it sufficiently unobscene to allow its importation into the United States--and Virginia Woolf was moved to decry James Joyce's "cloacal obsession." None of these adjectives, however, do the slightest justice to the novel. To this day it remains the modernist masterpiece, in which the author takes both Celtic lyricism and vulgarity to splendid extremes. It is funny, sorrowful, and even (in a close-focus sort of way) suspenseful. And despite the exegetical industry that has sprung up in the last 75 years, Ulysses is also a compulsively readable book. Even the verbal vaudeville of the final chapters can be navigated with relative ease, as long as you're...


Portable James Joyce
James Joyce
0140150307
November 1976
Paperback
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A Skeleton Key to Finnegans Wake: James Joyce's Masterwork
Joseph Campbell
1577314050
June 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Since its publication in 1939, countless would-be readers of Finnegans Wake - James Joyce's masterwork, which consumed a third of his life - have given up after a few pages, dismissing it as a "perverse triumph of the unintelligible." In 1944, a young professor of mythology and literature named Joseph Campbell, working with Henry Morton Robinson, wrote the first "key" or guide to entering the fascinating, disturbing, marvelously rich world of Finnegans Wake. The authors break down Joyce's "unintelligible" book page by page, stripping the text of much of its obscurity and serving up thoughtful interpretations via footnotes and bracketed commentary. They outline the book's basic action, and then simplify — and clarify — its complex web of images and allusions. A Skeleton Key to Finnegans...


Finnegans Wake
James Joyce
0141181265
September 1999
Paperback
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The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature
Experimental novel by James Joyce. Extracts of the work appeared as Work in Progress from 1928 to 1937, and it was published in its entirety as Finnegans Wake in 1939. The book is, in one sense, the story of a publican in Chapelizod (near Dublin), his wife, and their three children; but Mr. Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker, Mrs. Anna Livia Plurabelle, and Kevin, Jerry, and Isabel are every family of mankind. The motive idea of the novel, inspired by the 18th-century Italian philosopher Giambattista Vico, is that history is cyclic; to demonstrate this the book begins with the end of a sentence left unfinished on the last page. Languages merge: Anna Livia has "vlossyhair"--wlosy being Polish for "hair"; "a bad of wind" blows--bad being Persian for "wind." Characters from literature and history...


Recovering Your Story: Finding Yourself in the Work of Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner and Morrison
Arnold L. Weinstein
140006094X
March 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Weinstein, a professor of comparative literature at Brown, sets out to open up some of the great works of 20th-century fiction to the general reader. His decades in academia show: this is a teacherly account of the authors covered, and although the prose is mostly accessible and shies away from academic jargon, a reader must come to the book with some knowledge of concepts not usually discussed in general conversation: epistemology, jouissance and the Southern Code, to name a few. At first blush, the thesis of the book seems both restricting and reductive: that these novels help us discover "our story, our consciousness of things," as if the only reason to read were a narcissistic project of self-betterment. In fact, though, Weinstein's vision is far more generous. His claim, with other lovers of literature, is...


Dubliners
James Joyce
0553213806
March 1990
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Joyce's classic has been recorded before, of course, but in this new version, each of the 15 stories will be read by a different person, including writers Frank McCourt, Malachy McCourt, and Patrick McCabe, and actors Ciaran Hinds and Colm Meaney. Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From AudioFile
Jim Norton continues his interpretation of James Joyce's classic volume of short stories, originally published in 1914. Norton give us lively characterizations between narration delivered with a solemn detachment. I'm not sure this approach dovetails the author's narrative voice. Whether it does or not, it isn't particularly interesting. Y.R. © AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine-- Copyright ©...


Ulysses Annotated
Don Gifford
0520067452
October 1989
Textbook Paperback
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Jay Fox, Modern Fiction Studies
"A truly useful book in its explanation of puns, jokes, foreign phrases, and a myriad of other items including many helpful glosses on terms belonging to the vernacular of Dublin. For this last item alone the book is valuable because it documents much of the popular but fading idiom of the Dublin of 1904." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Robert N. Ross, Western Humanities Review
"[Ulysses Annotated] teaches more than how to read a particular novel; it teaches us more profoundly how to read anything. This, I think, is the book's main virtue. It teaches us readers how to transform the brute fact of our world." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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