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You Have to Be Careful in the Land of the Free
James Kelman
0151010420
May 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Booker Prize-winning Kelman (How Late It Was, How Late) returns with another exuberant novel steeped in Scottish dialect. Jeremiah Brown, the 32-year-old Scottish narrator, has lived in the United States for more than 12 years, acquiring an ex-girlfriend, a daughter ("the wean" he calls her) and a string of dead-end jobs. The novel is a chatty record of his last night in the country, before he returns to Glasgow (in the country of "Skallin," as he calls it) to see his ailing mother. As Jeremiah bar-hops in an unnamed Midwestern town, drinking beer after beer, he reflects on his life as an immigrant ("I read someplace the emigrants werenay the best people, the best people steyed at hame"), his relationship with Yasmin and their daughter, and just about anything else that pops into his head: "I had naybody to talk...


You Have to Be Careful in the Land of the Free
James Kelman
0156031728
May 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Booker Prize-winning Kelman (How Late It Was, How Late) returns with another exuberant novel steeped in Scottish dialect. Jeremiah Brown, the 32-year-old Scottish narrator, has lived in the United States for more than 12 years, acquiring an ex-girlfriend, a daughter ("the wean" he calls her) and a string of dead-end jobs. The novel is a chatty record of his last night in the country, before he returns to Glasgow (in the country of "Skallin," as he calls it) to see his ailing mother. As Jeremiah bar-hops in an unnamed Midwestern town, drinking beer after beer, he reflects on his life as an immigrant ("I read someplace the emigrants werenay the best people, the best people steyed at hame"), his relationship with Yasmin and their daughter, and just about anything else that pops into his head: "I had naybody to talk...


Translated Accounts
James Kelman
0385495811
October 2001
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Scottish writer Kelman, author of the Booker Prize-winning How Late It Was, How Late, here offers up a novel that is like a test case of Adorno's famous phrase, "to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric." Adorno meant that, in the service of mass murder, language had cut itself off from its emotional base, the affection that precedes communication. In Kelman's novel, language is deprived of both its beauty and its grammar, and studded with ugly political jargon and neologisms. A note at the beginning explains that the "accounts" that make up the book are narrations of incidents "transcribed and/or translated into English, not always by persons native to the tongue." The accounts are testimonies from some unspecified killing field, with elements reminiscent of Rwanda, Yugoslavia and even the Cultural Revolution...


The Good Times
James Kelman
0385495803
June 1999
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Year for The Good Times. Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
This is Scottish writer Kelman's first new work since his Booker Prize-winning novel How Late It Was, How Late. The collection features 20 stories, all narrated by male voices and all exploring what it means to be relied upon as a boy or a manAhow societal expectations of male roles shape behavior. Kelman writes with a coarse authenticity, exposing with raw honesty the bleak domestic lives and rough edges of so many of his working-class men. As with any writing that captures a regional vernacular so completely, it takes some pages for the reader's eyes and ears to adjust to the voices in this collection, and Kelman's extensive use of profanity may not appeal to all readers....


Translated Accounts
James Kelman
038549582X
Dec 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Scottish writer Kelman, author of the Booker Prize-winning How Late It Was, How Late, here offers up a novel that is like a test case of Adorno's famous phrase, "to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric." Adorno meant that, in the service of mass murder, language had cut itself off from its emotional base, the affection that precedes communication. In Kelman's novel, language is deprived of both its beauty and its grammar, and studded with ugly political jargon and neologisms. A note at the beginning explains that the "accounts" that make up the book are narrations of incidents "transcribed and/or translated into English, not always by persons native to the tongue." The accounts are testimonies from some unspecified killing field, with elements reminiscent of Rwanda, Yugoslavia and even the Cultural Revolution...


Busted Scotch
James Kelman
0393317773
June 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
The stories in James Kelman's collection, Busted Scotch are as bleak as a Scottish winter. Kelman's characters are working class people--mostly men, mostly inarticulate--whose dead-end existences are relentlessly dark. Fortunately, the reader, if not the characters, is rescued from this lunarscape vision by bracing doses of Kelman's black humor and impressive prose. Sometimes, as in "Nice to be Nice," the prose is rendered in a thick Scots dialect that might confound readers outside of the U.K. Most stories, however, are more accessible linguistically, though liberally laced with obscenities. Kelman does not concentrate his energies on character development or even on action; nothing much happens in many of these stories, yet everything changes. In "Pictures," a man notices a woman in a movie...


How Late It Was, How Late
James Kelman
039332799X
Oct 2005
Paperback
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Book Review
"Ye wake in a corner and stay there hoping yer body will disappear, the thoughts smothering ye; these thoughts; but ye want to remember and face up to things, just something keeps ye from doing it, why can ye no do it; the words filling yer head: then the other words; there's something wrong; there's something far far wrong; ye're no a good man, ye're just no a good man." From the moment Sammy wakes slumped in a park corner, stiff and sore after a two-day drunk and wearing another man's shoes, James Kelman's Booker Prize-winning novel How Late it Was, How Late loosens a torrent of furious stream-of-consciousness prose that never lets up. Beaten savagely by Glasgow police, the shoplifting ex-con Sammy is hauled off to jail, where he wakes to a world gone black. For the rest of the novel he stumbles around the rainy...


Here Lies
Gilbert, David and Roesler, Karl, Eds.
0963919253
April 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
Here Lies is an anthology of short stories about lying. The premise is that every story either features the telling of a lie or the presence of a liar.

About the Author
David Gilbert lives and works in the San Francisco Bay Area. In addition to being the co-editor of this anthology, he is the author of a collection of short stories, I Shot The Hairdresser, and an experimental novel, Five Happiness. Karl Roeseler also lives in San Francisco and is the author of the novel, The Adventures of Gesso Martin, and a collection of poems, Last Decade. Gilbert and Roeseler previously edited another short story collection, 2000andWhat? Stories About The Millennium.


The Close Season
James Kelman
1899235043
Sept 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
As the buoyancy of Liverpool's industrial river-trade slips away into history, there are few guarantees for lives that are improvised and uncertain. Away from the defining nature of the workplace, Grant dwells on togetherness and the intimate encounters of family life. With eloquence and beauty, The Close Season bears witness to the tender urgencies of kinship and survival. A powerful and humorous story by James Kelman complements the photographs. He is one of the U.K.'s leading novelists and was the winner of the 1994 Booker Prize with his novel How Late It Was, How Late. "No hidden agendas, no exploitation, just a short cut to knowing what it was like to be there."-Martin Parr

About the Author


Seven Stories
James Kelman
1873176341

Paperback
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Contemporary British Novel since 1980
James Acheson
1403974306
March 2006
Paperback
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